Topics

Yammer - the conversation continues #Yammer


Ranta, Dan <dan.ranta@...>
 

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce.   Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010).  On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint.  Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily. 

 

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively.  Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

 

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this?  What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

 

Thanks, Dan


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

 

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce.   Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010).  On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint.  Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily. 

 

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively.  Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

 

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this?  What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

 

Thanks, Dan


Ranta, Dan <dan.ranta@...>
 

Thanks Matt – yes, we do have Yammer activity happening.  It’s funny, across our industry, there are many, many, many, many companies that would love to have the KM program that we have (across industries as well – we are the NYYs of KM), yet – within our company there are groups who want to be more “social” without really realizing what we have.  That’s what makes it all so interesting!  I like your idea of a proof of concept.  While we are more collaborative than 99 percent + of ALL companies, we can tinker with how we can become more fluid and dynamic.  And since we cannot see the future, we have to be open to new ideas and enablement.

Dan

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 12, 2013 3:42 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL]Re: [sikmleaders] Yammer - the conversation continues

Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore

+61 423 784 504


On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Thanks, Dan


katepugh@...
 

Hi, Dan, Matt and others

I really agree with Matt about the challenges, and I am also a fan of both Sharepoint and Yammer and a number of other social tools. At Columbia's Information and Knowledge Strategy master's program we are teaching the students to use four disciplines as they post -- as if it were a team sport, where the goal is collective insight.  (Sometimes that needs to be sleuthed out of  a long meandering discussion. 

I've shared the four discussion disciplines here last year, but I can tell you more confidently that they are having an impact on discussion quality and outcomes, and they may help us all to bridge between our "documenty" and "yammery" worlds. The four discussion disciplines are:

1. Integrity (using your true voice and asking questions that are crisp and engaging) 
2. Courtesy (being respectful of differences in understanding and even language)
3. Inclusion (being intentional about bringing in other voices, e.g., by calling in [e.g., using the @twitterhandle] to get them to help or to benefit)
4. Translation (creating a decisive view of the series of posts. Summarize "where have we been, and what does it amount to?" I can't overstate the importance of this. We all hate joining discussions where there are no "mile markers" and we feel like outsiders. 

When I assign discussions I have one student take on the role of "lead" (that might be the person trying to solve a problem) and then I have a few others responsible for monitoring the four disciplines.  (I call them "social reporters," but I've learned from Beverly Trayner I should call these "community keepers.") The skill of translation or integration is critical, and many of us don't see it as our responsibility when we engage others in social. 

The students have become pretty adept at being both in the discussion and observing its patterns. I was gratified to see that several of them have been using these disciplines in their business meetings as well!

Kate

 
Katrina Pugh
President, AlignConsulting
Author of Sharing Hidden Know-How (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2011)
katepugh@...
www.alignconsultinginc.com
617 967 3910 (m)


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Moore
To: sikmleaders
Sent: Sun, May 12, 2013 4:42 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Yammer - the conversation continues

 
Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

 
We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce.   Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010).  On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint.  Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily. 
 
Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively.  Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.
 
Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this?  What should we be thinking about and evaluating?
 
Thanks, Dan


Arthur Shelley
 

Dan & Matt,

Melbourne KMLF (Knowledge Management Leadership Forum - like a smaller sister to SIKM Leaders), a voluntary professional development community in operation for 14 years, has recently started using Yammer.

It is working nicely for us, but like all tools (in my experience), should support the interactions - not BE. The interactions. At Matt said, it is great to support both real time and asynchronous conversations which is great for a dispersed group. It also supports members being part of many networks from one account/profile, with the potential to view through one "Home" page. The coordinating team collaboratively develop our documents on Yammer as we at rarely together and this works fine (though our processes do not need to comply with any stringent control processes, though full history is available for review/reversion if needed).

We also use Meetup.com to schedule and market our monthly events as Yammer is not designed for this purpose. 

Arthur
Tweeting as Metaphorage

On 13/05/2013, at 6:42, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:

 

Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

 

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce.   Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010).  On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint.  Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily. 

 

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively.  Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

 

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this?  What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

 

Thanks, Dan


gordonvalawebb <gvalawebb@...>
 

I'm wondering what your purpose is?

Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of learning about enterprise social networking (I had Yammer in pilot for three years, led the Global Design workstream as part of a rollout of Jive to 175,000 worldwide, had a Newsgator proof of concept, tested IBM Connections . .)

But I wonder about the incremental value and the opportunity cost. For example, some alternative "learning" you could pursue could include: how video - especially recorded PowerPoint slides - can enable your business? What is the quality of your people-finding capabilities? What about support for ideation and innovation acceleration (technology, governance, cultural)?

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each - powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks - since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Thanks, Dan


Stan Garfield
 

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value

  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization
Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organization, and get acquainted with new people.

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.


James Robertson
 

That's a great post Stan!

Collaboration is a big umbrella, containing a wide mix of technologies
and approaches. As you so articulately outline, different tools serve
different (and hopefully complementary) needs.

I also agree on the need for cross-linking, but I'd go one step further.

A while back, we wrote an article highlighting the critical importance
of having just one staff profile across all platforms:

http://www.steptwo.com.au/papers/cmb_profile/index.html

For example: when you click on the underlined person's name in Yammer
(or Chatter, Newsgator, etc), where does it go? Unfortunately to
that product's own profile page, not a page that brings together all
collaboration activities into the one place.

Now hopefully this will happen in due course between SharePoint and
Yammer, but that still leaves a lot of other potential platforms to
bring together.

No easy answers unfortunately! But how long can we survive when we
keep fragmenting users across an ever-growing number of technologies?

Cheers,
James

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization"
where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program
and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share
on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to
explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we
were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to
be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal
knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave
report on social networking
2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before,
and if so, how was it solved?
3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement
benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the
quals database
5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent
planning session today
6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia
office today; does anyone wish to meet?
7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the
global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and
deliver value

1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods,
and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will
include Yammer feeds)
4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include
Yammer-based discussion boards)
5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization

Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on
SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important
questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I
compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in
one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions,
consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community.
If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which
can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions,
keep tabs on the pulse of the organization, and get acquainted with new
people.

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social
layer and a more extensive activity stream. And now that Yammer is part
of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other
Microsoft products.

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if
you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link
between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each
system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.


--
-------------------------
James Robertson, Managing Director
Step Two Designs

Email: jamesr@steptwo.com.au
Web: www.steptwo.com.au
Phone: +61 2 9319 7901


Mark Tilbury
 

Stan - you hit the nail on the head with the last sentence. Define 'what goes where'. We are currently deploying Yammer plus new intranet and document management systems. Prior to talk of technology deployment we are setting out a clear strategy, a content strategy, a design programme that looks at how these are integrated. The one issue for me is how well can search tie these elements together. Metadata and taxonomies will help for structured content but the key is how we look to surface Yammer discussions via enterprise search. I know one provider can do this but is expensive and currently I doubt the business is ready to articulate what they need to surface. So its content strategy, deployment and a search working group to define requirements prior to enterprise search coming along.
 
Mark Tilbury

From: StanGarfield
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 12:01 AM
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues
 
>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

Here are some of my current thoughts.
Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues
  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream
Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value
  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization
Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organization, and get acquainted with new people.

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.


Stuart French <sjfrenc@...>
 

Fantastic post Stan.

Can't agree more that interlinking is key for this and some governance to guide correct usage is a priority to avoid inefficiencies or even loss of critical knowledge.

For me Yammer presents an opportunity to connect systems by tapping in to the workflow to collect knowledge.  For example we are looking at having all contract changes in our ERP automatically post on Yammer with a link to the customer in CRM, then our CRM Customer page will include the last 10 Yams about it, keeping the Sales team abreast of changes made in Operations without having to ask all the time and without the Ops team doing any extra work, it will happen automatically.

Stu French.


On 14 May 2013 09:01, StanGarfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
 

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value

  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization
Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organization, and get acquainted with new people.

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.





Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Stan/Mark/James/Stuart,

There's a bunch of issues here that seem to be pretty pertinent and that I'm hearing a lot also.
- There's a proliferation of collaboration platforms at the moment. Generic ones like SharePoint. Conversational ones like Yammer, Jive & Chatter. Activity-specific ones like Basecamp.
- If you have more than one of these you risk creating more silos. And annoying people - "Where do I go for this stuff? I'm confused".
- There's a need for technical integration between platforms so it doesn't really matter where you go - you can still get what you need from everything else. Most organisations are a long way from that.
- There's a governance piece around clarity in terms of which tool you use for what. Why not use Yammer as a document management system? After all, you can post documents in there. Or so users ask.
- There's also a piece as to how collaboration products get embedded in work. Because if they are seen as a time overhead ("you want me to collaborate and do my job?" rather than "I collaborate while doing my job") then they don't get much love.

We haven't solved this yet but lots of people's thinking is going in that direction.

Cheers,

Matt

On May 15, 2013, at 9:45 AM, Stuart French <sjfrenc@...> wrote:

 

Fantastic post Stan.


Can't agree more that interlinking is key for this and some governance to guide correct usage is a priority to avoid inefficiencies or even loss of critical knowledge.

For me Yammer presents an opportunity to connect systems by tapping in to the workflow to collect knowledge.  For example we are looking at having all contract changes in our ERP automatically post on Yammer with a link to the customer in CRM, then our CRM Customer page will include the last 10 Yams about it, keeping the Sales team abreast of changes made in Operations without having to ask all the time and without the Ops team doing any extra work, it will happen automatically.

Stu French.
www.deltaknowledge.net

On 14 May 2013 09:01, StanGarfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
 

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value

  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization
Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organization, and get acquainted with new people.

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.




--
Kind regards,

Stuart French
Blog: http://www.deltaknowledge.net/
www.linkedin.com/in/stuartfrench


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Dan –

 

May  I suggest that, perhaps, you might want to rephrase the question from “I have a tool and want to know how to use it”  to “I have some work to do and want to know what tool to use to help me do that work?”  Specifically, collaboration is a means of accomplishing work.  People used to collaborate long before Web 2.0 and even the Internet!  And Yammer is one of many ways of supporting collaboration among dispersed participants. 

 

I have a little framework of: create, validate, structure, and authorize for moving knowledge from the mind of an individual into a knowledge-based product or service.  Collaboration plays a role in creation and validation.  An essential element of that framework is that various processes must be in place to manage knowledge and knowledge work within each phase of the framework as well as to transfer knowledge across the four stages of the framework.  

 

See the following link for more than you ever wanted to know about thisJ

 

http://cradpdf.drdc-rddc.gc.ca/PDFS/unc118/p536618_A1b.pdf

 

Al Simard

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Ranta, Dan
Sent: May-12-13 5:13 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Yammer - the conversation continues

 

Thanks Matt – yes, we do have Yammer activity happening.  It’s funny, across our industry, there are many, many, many, many companies that would love to have the KM program that we have (across industries as well – we are the NYYs of KM), yet – within our company there are groups who want to be more “social” without really realizing what we have.  That’s what makes it all so interesting!  I like your idea of a proof of concept.  While we are more collaborative than 99 percent + of ALL companies, we can tinker with how we can become more fluid and dynamic.  And since we cannot see the future, we have to be open to new ideas and enablement.

Dan

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Matt Moore
Sent: Sunday, May 12, 2013 3:42 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL]Re: [sikmleaders] Yammer - the conversation continues

Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore

+61 423 784 504


On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" dan.ranta@...> wrote:

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each – powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks – since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.

Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization” where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.

Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Thanks, Dan


Ranta, Dan <dan.ranta@...>
 

Thanks Stan – you are always so helpful and willing to share your experiences.

 

Here we sit in our company with what is a world class KM program – by many accounts.  But despite our strong executive support, business value captured, engagement across the business, etc., we believe we have to continue to try to make things better.  We can’t see the future, but in terms of our enablement (technology and processes) our knowledge workers often ask for a more fluid and dynamic (I guess this is “social”) environment.

 

A follow-up question on this subject is:  what’s better, the social out of the box with SharePoint 2013 or Yammer? 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of StanGarfield
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2013 6:02 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL][sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues

 

 

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

 

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value

  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization

Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

 

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

 

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organizatio! n, and get acquainted with new people.

 

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

 

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.


Simard, Albert <albert.simard@...>
 

Dan –

 

As an agency in the throes of implementing SharePoint 2010, I’d say that unless 2013 is a whole lot better re: social interaction, I’d look elsewhere.  In fact, in our culture, I find that it tends to reinforce rather than break down silo mentalities.

 

Al

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Ranta, Dan
Sent: May-15-13 1:53 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues

 

 

Thanks Stan – you are always so helpful and willing to share your experiences.

 

Here we sit in our company with what is a world class KM program – by many accounts.  But despite our strong executive support, business value captured, engagement across the business, etc., we believe we have to continue to try to make things better.  We can’t see the future, but in terms of our enablement (technology and processes) our knowledge workers often ask for a more fluid and dynamic (I guess this is “social”) environment.

 

A follow-up question on this subject is:  what’s better, the social out of the box with SharePoint 2013 or Yammer? 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of StanGarfield
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2013 6:02 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL][sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues

 

 

>Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based "ad-hoc organization" where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation. Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?

Dan, when Yammer first started to be used in my firm, I was prepared to explain why it shouldn't be used for community discussions, because we were already using SharePoint discussion boards. And there continue to be similar concerns about the differences between Yammer and formal knowledge repositories. My thinking has evolved since then.

 

Here are some of my current thoughts.

Use Yammer to quickly connect and interact with global colleagues

  1. Share a link, e.g., here is a link to the latest Forrester Wave report on social networking
  2. Ask a question, e.g., has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?
  3. Find a resource, e.g., looking for a specialist in retirement benefits to help win a bid in Calgary
  4. Answer a post, e.g., here are links to three relevant quals in the quals database
  5. Recognize a colleague, e.g., thanks to Jane for hosting an excellent planning session today
  6. Inform about your activities, e.g., will be in the Philadelphia office today; does anyone wish to meet?
  7. Suggest an idea, e.g., local office TV screens should display the global Yammer conversation stream

Use KM systems to access knowledge assets and expertise to sell work and deliver value

  1. Finding and reusing knowledge assets (research, insights, methods, and tools) to deliver value to clients throughout the project life cycle
  2. Accessing our collective experience through documents and qualifications
  3. Showcasing expertise and finding experts via profiles (which will include Yammer feeds)
  4. Connecting and collaborating with communities (which will include Yammer-based discussion boards)
  5. Contributing knowledge assets to the global organization

Cross-linking between the two becomes very important. We embed Yammer on SharePoint sites, and link from Yammer to KM systems.

 

It's useful to create lists in SharePoint containing the important questions and answers mined from Yammer discussions. For example, I compiled a SharePoint list with 125 FAQs about using Yammer, which is in one place, searchable, and can be sorted and filtered.

 

If you can't or don't wish to use Yammer for your community discussions, consider using it for general discussions not specific to one community. If you monitor the All Conversations feed, you can look for posts which can be redirected to specific communities. And you can answer questions, keep tabs on the pulse of the organizatio! n, and get acquainted with new people.

 

You can also integrate Yammer with transaction systems to add a social layer and a more extensive activity stream.  And now that Yammer is part of Microsoft, you can expect better integration with Office and other Microsoft products.

 

In summary, look for ways to integrate Yammer with other systems, see if you can make it the social component of existing systems, cross-link between Yammer and other systems, and clearly define when to use each system. I will be glad to discuss this in greater detail if you like.


Stan Garfield
 

>Our knowledge workers often ask for a more fluid and dynamic (I guess this is "social") environment.

Yes, this is one reason to consider meeting this demand with tools that appear to be more "social" or "cool" or whatever differentiates them from the status quo. This might appear to be superficial - after all, the existing tools are capable of doing the job - but it still may increase the appeal to your users.

> A follow-up question on this subject is: what's better, the social out of the box with SharePoint 2013 or Yammer?

I can't answer for SharePoint 2013. For previous versions, the out-of-the-box social experience of SharePoint was inferior to Yammer. I think that is one reason why Microsoft bought Yammer - to give inject a more social user interface, framework, and mindset into their products.


albert.simard <albert.simard@...>
 

A few of us introduced Yammer, but it never caught on in a significant way. Probably because it had no official sponsorship and it was just another thing to keep track of.

A group in our agency is using Jive and I find it far more intuitive and socially aware than SharePoint. However there are reports of two issues: security and liscensing cost. Note: the latter two are hearsay on my part, so check them out yourself.

Al

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:

Dan,

I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.

One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).

Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.

The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).

Cheers,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504
matt@...
Sent from my iPhone

On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" <dan.ranta@...> wrote:

We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each â€" powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks â€" since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.



Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization� where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.



Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?



Thanks, Dan


Maria Brindlmayer
 

We piloted Yammer in a large professional services company. It caught on with some marketing groups and some IT people, but did not catch on more broadly. An evaluation of the pilot showed that it did not add a lot of value at the time. The company ultimately banned access to Yammer (but later decided to implement Jive).
-Maria


On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 2:19 PM, albert.simard <albert.simard@...> wrote:
 

A few of us introduced Yammer, but it never caught on in a significant way. Probably because it had no official sponsorship and it was just another thing to keep track of.

A group in our agency is using Jive and I find it far more intuitive and socially aware than SharePoint. However there are reports of two issues: security and liscensing cost. Note: the latter two are hearsay on my part, so check them out yourself.

Al

--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore wrote:
>
> Dan,
>
> I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.
>
> One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).
>
> Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.
>
> The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt Moore
> +61 423 784 504
> matt@...
>
>
> On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" wrote:
>
> > We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each â€" powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks â€" since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.
> >
> >
> >
> > Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization†where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?
> >
> >
> >
> > Thanks, Dan
> >
> >
>




--
---------------------------------------------------
Maria Brindlmayer
cell: 202-365-2440


Sameer Bhide
 

Great discussion all...

Many clients of mine who have SP are debating on Yammer versus other tools in the market place. I expect Yammer to integrate nicely in SP 2015 (if that is what it is going to be
called) not in SP 2013.

At Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), we took the custom route....we  implemented a custom solution which our Web 2.0 Research Labs have built over the years since there 
 was no tool available in the marketplace. It is now deployed to 260,000 employees worldwide and can be accessed via mobile.
 
Regards

Sameer Bhide




From: Maria Brindlmayer
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 2:27 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues

 
We piloted Yammer in a large professional services company. It caught on with some marketing groups and some IT people, but did not catch on more broadly. An evaluation of the pilot showed that it did not add a lot of value at the time. The company ultimately banned access to Yammer (but later decided to implement Jive).
-Maria


On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 2:19 PM, albert.simard <albert.simard@...> wrote:
 
A few of us introduced Yammer, but it never caught on in a significant way. Probably because it had no official sponsorship and it was just another thing to keep track of.

A group in our agency is using Jive and I find it far more intuitive and socially aware than SharePoint. However there are reports of two issues: security and liscensing cost. Note: the latter two are hearsay on my part, so check them out yourself.

Al

--- In sikmleaders@..., Matt Moore >
> Dan,
>
> I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.
>
> One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).
>
> Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.
>
> The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt Moore
> +61 423 784 504
> matt@...
>
>
> On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" wrote:
>
> > We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each â€" powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks â€" since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.
> >
> >
> >
> > Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization†where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?
> >
> >
> >
> > Thanks, Dan
> >
> >
>




--
---------------------------------------------------
Maria Brindlmayer
cell: 202-365-2440




Mark Tilbury
 

Does anyone know of any case studies I can find where social business tools have not proved a success. The context is we are deploying a tool and what to present to leadership the good and the bad. All to often we just hear about success stories and any 'wise old dog' would know we can learn more from the failures than reading about a company that deployed to 50k plus and their major metric of success is getting more people on their annual fun run (know disrepect if this is a key metric within your company)!
 
cheers

From: Maria Brindlmayer
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues
 
We piloted Yammer in a large professional services company. It caught on with some marketing groups and some IT people, but did not catch on more broadly. An evaluation of the pilot showed that it did not add a lot of value at the time. The company ultimately banned access to Yammer (but later decided to implement Jive).
-Maria
On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 2:19 PM, albert.simard <albert.simard@...> wrote:
 
A few of us introduced Yammer, but it never caught on in a significant way. Probably because it had no official sponsorship and it was just another thing to keep track of.

A group in our agency is using Jive and I find it far more intuitive and socially aware than SharePoint. However there are reports of two issues: security and liscensing cost. Note: the latter two are hearsay on my part, so check them out yourself.

Al

--- In mailto:sikmleaders%40yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore wrote:
>
> Dan,
>
> I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.
>
> One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).
>
> Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.
>
> The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt Moore
> +61 423 784 504
> matt@...
>
>
> On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" wrote:
>
> > We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each â€" powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks â€" since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.
> >
> >
> >
> > Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization†where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?
> >
> >
> >
> > Thanks, Dan
> >
> >
>

--
---------------------------------------------------
Maria Brindlmayer
cell: 202-365-2440


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Mark,

There are a lot of less than successful stories but from what I've heard, they're all pretty similar: "Some people were using the tool but not that many and it all kinda fizzled out..."

If anyone has unsuccessful stories that are different to that then I would also like to hear them.

Cheers,

Matt

On May 17, 2013, at 6:36 AM, mark.tilbury@... wrote:

 

Does anyone know of any case studies I can find where social business tools have not proved a success. The context is we are deploying a tool and what to present to leadership the good and the bad. All to often we just hear about success stories and any 'wise old dog' would know we can learn more from the failures than reading about a company that deployed to 50k plus and their major metric of success is getting more people on their annual fun run (know disrepect if this is a key metric within your company)!
 
cheers

From: Maria Brindlmayer <mbrindlmay001@...>
To: sikmleaders@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Yammer - the conversation continues
 
We piloted Yammer in a large professional services company. It caught on with some marketing groups and some IT people, but did not catch on more broadly. An evaluation of the pilot showed that it did not add a lot of value at the time. The company ultimately banned access to Yammer (but later decided to implement Jive).
-Maria
On Wed, May 15, 2013 at 2:19 PM, albert.simard <albert.simard@...> wrote:
 
A few of us introduced Yammer, but it never caught on in a significant way. Probably because it had no official sponsorship and it was just another thing to keep track of.

A group in our agency is using Jive and I find it far more intuitive and socially aware than SharePoint. However there are reports of two issues: security and liscensing cost. Note: the latter two are hearsay on my part, so check them out yourself.

Al

--- In mailto:sikmleaders%40yahoogroups.com, Matt Moore wrote:
>
> Dan,
>
> I have some experience with Yammer & more with Jive. One of the reasons that these tools have gained in popularity is that collaboration functionality that is conversational (rather than document-centric) has traditionally been poor in SharePoint.
>
> One of the issues with Yammer is that it is very much focused on conversation in the now rather than the management & curation of material going forward - or backwards for that matter. An acquaintance of mine at a telco has been working thru some of these issues in terms of capturing recurring questions from Yammer (in effect, finding a middle pace layer between Yammer chat & SharePoint documents).
>
> Nevertheless, I think these kinds of tools are useful. In your situation, you might want to pilot a tool like Yammer with a group that is focused on topics that benefit from fast, free-flowing interaction (e.g. innovation) rather than a business critical single source of truth.
>
> The other thing about Yammer is that because of their business model, there probably already are ConocoPhillips Yammer groups out there (unless you've blocked the Yammer site).
>
> Cheers,
>
> Matt Moore
> +61 423 784 504
> matt@...
>
>
> On May 13, 2013, at 3:19 AM, "Ranta, Dan" wrote:
>
> > We continue learning (and wondering) about how Yammer may integrate with our existing KM Program and how we have worked to organize our knowledge workers across our about 17,000-person global workforce. Our program features just over 100 global networks (numbering between about 100 and 800 employees each â€" powered by a customized version of SharePoint 2010). On average our each network member is a member of 3 networks â€" since each network has the same look and feel in our customized version of SharePoint. Our overall approach is embraced by our business as reflected in the great amount of business-based, value-adding collaboration we have daily.
> >
> >
> >
> > Additionally, one of our key commitments to our leadership is that all KM activity will be curated, monitored, and moderated by experienced folks to ensure the best, safest knowledge is shared effectively. Yammer offers an opportunity of broad-based “ad-hoc organization†where we could potentially weaken the strength of our overall program and our moderation / curation.
> >
> >
> >
> > Anyone have relevant experiences to share on this? What should we be thinking about and evaluating?
> >
> >
> >
> > Thanks, Dan
> >
> >
>

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Maria Brindlmayer
cell: 202-365-2440