Knowledge mapping #mapping


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hello,
 
I'm doing some work on knowledge mapping at the moment. I am aware of the APQC's publications on this topic. However I'm interested in getting a sense of the techniques that people are using currently.
 
What I would like to do is get some qualitative feedback from people on the lists then I may set up a short survey about usage & attitudes and publish the results back to the groups. If someone has done this already then I will simply copy what they have done and not reinvent the wheel, etc, etc.
 
First of all, how do people out there define a knowledge map? For me, it's any graphical representation of knowledge in an organisation. And because knowledge is complex, mulit-facted thing, this means that knowledge maps can take many forms. Knowledge maps are all about understanding what you have, they are often developed collectively to generate a shared understanding of knowledge, they can be used to communicate issues to other stakeholders.
 
HOW DO YOU DEFINE A KNOWLEDGE MAP? WHAT IS IT FOR? WHAT SHOULD BE IN ONE?
 
The most common forms that I have seen are:
- Business process mapping
- Content audits/inventories - that list either individual content items or groups of content items along with notes around purpose, audience, ownership, etc.
- Skills inventories - that break out different skills by individual or even group.
- Social network analysis - that displays the relationships
- Concept maps & topic maps that display relationships between concepts or entities (and here we start moving into ontologies)
They don't have to be these - a memorable example of a knowledge map was produced by a market research company for new starters as a game of snakes & ladders.
 
WHAT OTHER MAPS HAVE YOU COME ACROSS THAT YOU'D CALL A KNOWLEDGE MAP?
 
Any contributions much appreciated.
 
Matt


 


Neil Olonoff
 

Matt: 

Perhaps 6-8 years ago I did some extensive research in knowledge mapping and came up with the conclusions you are finding: although the phrase is intriguing, we in the KM community have not yet developed any consensus about what "knowledge mapping" really means. Is it ...
- content mapping
- people / expertise mapping

I do think there have been some interesting efforts along this line and the ones mentioned are among them. I'll see if I can find my original notes on the topic and if so forward along. 
Best regards, 

Neil 



Neil Olonoff 
Mobile: 703.2834157
Office:  703.440.1298
Skype: nolonoff



On Mon, May 27, 2013 at 3:54 PM, Matt Moore <innotecture@...> wrote:
 

Hello,
 
I'm doing some work on knowledge mapping at the moment. I am aware of the APQC's publications on this topic. However I'm interested in getting a sense of the techniques that people are using currently.
 
What I would like to do is get some qualitative feedback from people on the lists then I may set up a short survey about usage & attitudes and publish the results back to the groups. If someone has done this already then I will simply copy what they have done and not reinvent the wheel, etc, etc.
 
First of all, how do people out there define a knowledge map? For me, it's any graphical representation of knowledge in an organisation. And because knowledge is complex, mulit-facted thing, this means that knowledge maps can take many forms. Knowledge maps are all about understanding what you have, they are often developed collectively to generate a shared understanding of knowledge, they can be used to communicate issues to other stakeholders.
 
HOW DO YOU DEFINE A KNOWLEDGE MAP? WHAT IS IT FOR? WHAT SHOULD BE IN ONE?
 
The most common forms that I have seen are:
- Business process mapping
- Content audits/inventories - that list either individual content items or groups of content items along with notes around purpose, audience, ownership, etc.
- Skills inventories - that break out different skills by individual or even group.
- Social network analysis - that displays the relationships
- Concept maps & topic maps that display relationships between concepts or entities (and here we start moving into ontologies)
They don't have to be these - a memorable example of a knowledge map was produced by a market research company for new starters as a game of snakes & ladders.
 
WHAT OTHER MAPS HAVE YOU COME ACROSS THAT YOU'D CALL A KNOWLEDGE MAP?
 
Any contributions much appreciated.
 
Matt



swieneke@...
 

Matt,

We use knowledge "mapping" (we call knowledge modeling) to assist a subject matter responsible person in graphically defining their area of practice. This modeling technique surfaces the relationships between topics and the composition of each topic. The modeling exercise allows the subject matter responsible person to again becomes aware of what they know and improves their ability to comprehensively express and share their knowledge. For examples follow this link http://elkawareness.com/diagrams.htm

Regards,

Steven Wieneke
Wieneke & Wieneke, Inc.
www.elkawareness.com


Quoting Matt Moore <innotecture@yahoo.com>:

Hello,
I'm doing some work on knowledge mapping at the moment. I am aware of the APQC's publications on this topic. However I'm interested in getting a sense of the techniques that people are using currently.
What I would like to do is get some qualitative feedback from people on the lists then I may set up a short survey about usage & attitudes and publish the results back to the groups. If someone has done this already then I will simply copy what they have done and not reinvent the wheel, etc, etc.
First of all, how do people out there define a knowledge map? For me, it's any graphical representation of knowledge in an organisation. And because knowledge is complex, mulit-facted thing, this means that knowledge maps can take many forms. Knowledge maps are all about understanding what you have, they are often developed collectively to generate a shared understanding of knowledge, they can be used to communicate issues to other stakeholders.
HOW DO YOU DEFINE A KNOWLEDGE MAP? WHAT IS IT FOR? WHAT SHOULD BE IN ONE?
The most common forms that I have seen are:
- Business process mapping
- Contentaudits/inventories - that list either individual content items or groups of content items along with notes around purpose, audience, ownership, etc.
- Skills inventories - that break out different skills by individual or even group.
- Social network analysis - that displays the relationships
- Concept maps & topic maps that display relationships between concepts or entities (and here we start moving into ontologies)
They don't have to be these - a memorable example of a knowledge map was produced by a market research company for new starters as a game of snakes & ladders.
WHAT OTHER MAPS HAVE YOU COME ACROSS THAT YOU'D CALL A KNOWLEDGE MAP?
Any contributions much appreciated.
Matt


Jeff Stemke
 

Matt: I find it useful to change the question from "what you know" to "what you do". This more operational focus is easier to answer and often makes more sense to the managers funding the activity. 

Steven adds another interesting perspective that describes a deeper dive into how an individual "thinks about what they do": the important concepts, information and relationships someone has learned over time. I've been calling this a "mental model". 

The "what you do" and "what's important in what I do" maps have some interesting hyperlinks. For example, I may need certain information that I am not able to generate myself. The "what you do" map points me to experts who can provide it. Both maps are incredibly useful for knowledge transfer.

--Jeff

Stemke Consulting Group


Laurence Lock Lee
 

Good point Jeff ... its easy to get enamoured by the artefact being the knowledge map and forget about why we want it in the first place. I find using the action/decision point as the focus for the supporting knowledge (be it explicit information or tacit). Many years ago we adapted one of Dave Snowden's models 'ASHEN' (Artefact, Skills, Heuristics, Experience and Natural Talent) to map resources against key decision points in a clients business as part of an 'knowledge audit'. We had trouble articulating the E and the N parts and we wanted to include a Connectivity element, so our adaptation was to turn ASHEN into CASH :) ...not sure that Dave appreciated the adaptation but was pleased that we used it in the first place.

Laurie

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Stemke <jstemke@...> wrote:

Matt: I find it useful to change the question from "what you know" to "what
you do". This more operational focus is easier to answer and often makes
more sense to the managers funding the activity.

Steven adds another interesting perspective that describes a deeper dive
into how an individual "thinks about what they do": the important concepts,
information and relationships someone has learned over time. I've been
calling this a "mental model".

The "what you do" and "what's important in what I do" maps have some
interesting hyperlinks. For example, I may need certain information that I
am not able to generate myself. The "what you do" map points me to experts
who can provide it. Both maps are incredibly useful for knowledge transfer.

--Jeff

Stemke Consulting Group
www.transferknowhow.com


Andre Galitsky <andregalitsky@...>
 

I have a related question... How do you keep knowledge maps up to date? They're out of date almost as soon as you finish them. Is this included in the "knowledge borking" job description as well? ;)

---
Andre Galitsky
Enterprise Architect
ITKM Systems, LLC
(m) 502-370-6488
(o) 804-368-0730
(e) andre.galitsky@itkmsystems.com

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, "llocklee" <llocklee@...> wrote:

Good point Jeff ... its easy to get enamoured by the artefact being the knowledge map and forget about why we want it in the first place. I find using the action/decision point as the focus for the supporting knowledge (be it explicit information or tacit). Many years ago we adapted one of Dave Snowden's models 'ASHEN' (Artefact, Skills, Heuristics, Experience and Natural Talent) to map resources against key decision points in a clients business as part of an 'knowledge audit'. We had trouble articulating the E and the N parts and we wanted to include a Connectivity element, so our adaptation was to turn ASHEN into CASH :) ...not sure that Dave appreciated the adaptation but was pleased that we used it in the first place.

Laurie

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Stemke <jstemke@> wrote:

Matt: I find it useful to change the question from "what you know" to "what
you do". This more operational focus is easier to answer and often makes
more sense to the managers funding the activity.

Steven adds another interesting perspective that describes a deeper dive
into how an individual "thinks about what they do": the important concepts,
information and relationships someone has learned over time. I've been
calling this a "mental model".

The "what you do" and "what's important in what I do" maps have some
interesting hyperlinks. For example, I may need certain information that I
am not able to generate myself. The "what you do" map points me to experts
who can provide it. Both maps are incredibly useful for knowledge transfer.

--Jeff

Stemke Consulting Group
www.transferknowhow.com


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Just a short interjection here Andre

"How do you keep knowledge maps up to date? They're out of date almost as soon as you finish them. Is this included in the "knowledge borking" job description as well? ;)"

One point about a map is that it should change at the same speed as the territory to which it refers. Some things move very quickly. Some things move slower (c.f. pace layering and shearing layers). Not everything is out of date as soon as you annotate it.

Sometimes I think that pace layering is THE insight in information (or knowledge) management of the last 15 years.


Douglas Weidner
 

Andre,

 

Your comment triggered a principle, though possibly not directly applicable.

 

If K Maps were based on job descriptions vs. role profiles, they probably lack accuracy and specificity.

 

Douglas Weidner, Chief CKM Instructor

Chairman, International Knowledge Management Institute

Best in Blended KM Training & Certification

Home of the KM Body of Knowledge (KMBOK)™

Knowledge Maturity Model (KMM)™, and

KM Transformation Solution

O: 703-757-1395

douglas.weidner@...
www.kminstitute.org
 



      

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Andre Galitsky
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:29 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Knowledge mapping

 

 

I have a related question... How do you keep knowledge maps up to date? They're out of date almost as soon as you finish them. Is this included in the "knowledge borking" job description as well? ;)

---
Andre Galitsky
Enterprise Architect
ITKM Systems, LLC
(m) 502-370-6488
(o) 804-368-0730
(e) andre.galitsky@...

--- In sikmleaders@..., "llocklee" <llocklee@...> wrote:
>
> Good point Jeff ... its easy to get enamoured by the artefact being the knowledge map and forget about why we want it in the first place. I find using the action/decision point as the focus for the supporting knowledge (be it explicit information or tacit). Many years ago we adapted one of Dave Snowden's models 'ASHEN' (Artefact, Skills, Heuristics, Experience and Natural Talent) to map resources against key decision points in a clients business as part of an 'knowledge audit'. We had trouble articulating the E and the N parts and we wanted to include a Connectivity element, so our adaptation was to turn ASHEN into CASH :) ...not sure that Dave appreciated the adaptation but was pleased that we used it in the first place.
>
> Laurie
>
> --- In sikmleaders@..., Jeff Stemke wrote:
> >
> > Matt: I find it useful to change the question from "what you know" to "what
> > you do". This more operational focus is easier to answer and often makes
> > more sense to the managers funding the activity.
> >
> > Steven adds another interesting perspective that describes a deeper dive
> > into how an individual "thinks about what they do": the important concepts,
> > information and relationships someone has learned over time. I've been
> > calling this a "mental model".
> >
> > The "what you do" and "what's important in what I do" maps have some
> > interesting hyperlinks. For example, I may need certain information that I
> > am not able to generate myself. The "what you do" map points me to experts
> > who can provide it. Both maps are incredibly useful for knowledge transfer.
> >
> > --Jeff
> >
> > Stemke Consulting Group
> > www.transferknowhow.com
> >
>


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