Looking for email retention policies and email archive best practices #email #archiving


Connie Crosby
 


Hello KM gurus:

I am working with a client that is a regulatory body for one of the professions. My task is to help them create an email retention policy framework and determine best practices on email storage/archiving. 

- Does anyone have email retention policy or guidelines that you would be willing to share? and/or
- Would you or someone in your organization be willing to take a call with me to talk briefly about email retention and storage? 

My deadline is of course tight--I am looking to gather as much information by early next week if possible. 

Please email me directly - connie@... 

Thanks kindly, 
C
onnie


Connie Crosby
Crosby Group Consulting
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
416-919-6719
|
conniecrosby@...  
http://www.crosbygroup.ca | http://twitter.com/conniecrosby | http://conniecrosby.blogspot.com 


Murray Jennex
 

I can't give you a policy but I will outline what we did.  My other specialty is cyber security and I'm a former nuclear engineer in the commercial nuclear world.  We used transitioning to a new email a platform as a reason for implementing a new email retention policy where email was only allowed to be on the server for 6 months, after which it was deleted.  This did not prevent users from keeping email they needed, but they had to download it to their machines.  I studied this in a longitudinal KM study and here are some findings:
 
prior to implementing the 6 month retention policy email was considered a knowledge repository and people kept it for years, after the policy it took a while for the culture to change as people had to actually decide what was important and then take steps to preserve it, much more work than just copying to a folder.
 
Why the change?  Email is inherently a false repository we found.  People tend to keep email that makes them look good or that justifies their decision,and discard that which does not, so as a repository it was incomplete.
 
Also, email is a legal liability.  You never know what people will say in email.  The subject organization settled a lawsuit when the plaintiffs subpoenaed their email because the organization just did not know what would be found in the email archives.
 
Out best practice was to use formal email communications built into the applications to capture email on projects and decision making that needed to be captured and to use the regular email system as an informal communication medium and not capture any of these emails.
 
Seems a little extreme but the more I look at it, the more it seems to me that email is a hidden evil that may ultimately do more harm than good.  Capture formal communications, not the informal ones.  These are my thoughts...murray
 
Murray E. Jennex, Ph.D., P.E., CISSP, CSSLP, PMP
Professor, San Diego State University
 

In a message dated 12/12/2013 2:00:52 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, conniecrosby@... writes:



Hello KM gurus:

I am working with a client that is a regulatory body for one of the professions. My task is to help them create an email retention policy framework and determine best practices on email storage/archiving. 

- Does anyone have email retention policy or guidelines that you would be willing to share? and/or
- Would you or someone in your organization be willing to take a call with me to talk briefly about email retention and storage? 

My deadline is of course tight--I am looking to gather as much information by early next week if possible. 

Please email me directly - connie@... 

Thanks kindly, 
C
onnie


Connie Crosby
Crosby Group Consulting
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
416-919-6719
|
conniecrosby@...  
http://www.crosbygroup.ca | http://twitter.com/conniecrosby | http://conniecrosby.blogspot.com