Topics

7 Habits of Highly Successful Knowledge Managers


Patti Anklam <patti@...>
 

Hi,

 

My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:

 

·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved

·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative

·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved

·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know

·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information

 

 

Some possible additions:

 

·         Connecting people

·         Working out loud

·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat

 

Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

Patti Anklam

Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

Harvard, MA 01451

+1(978)456-4175

 

 


Howie Cohen
 

Patti, 

        In one of my more recent client engagements the CKO decided to spend more money on travel than technology.  She said that her experience / habit that continues to pay off is communicate by engaging often.  In fact over 50% of her current budget is dedicated to global travel. Her KM program is now considered "top tier" and people are talking about knowledge concepts in ways never before seen or heard in the organization.  

Hope this helps! 
Howie 

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 1:16 PM, 'Patti Anklam' patti@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

 

My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:

 

·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved

·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative

·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved

·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know

·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information

 

 

Some possible additions:

 

·         Connecting people

·         Working out loud

·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat

 

Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

Patti Anklam

Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

Harvard, MA 01451

+1(978)456-4175

 

 



Stan Garfield
 

Patti, thanks for your post.  In addition to the SIRCL activities you listed, here are some additional thoughts.


Knowledge management is everyone's responsibility, not just the work of knowledge managers.  But knowledge managers are needed to raise awareness, align knowledge actions with business priorities, promote a knowledge sharing culture, engage senior leadership, manage the infrastructure, and support all knowledge workers.

 

Good knowledge managers are part connector, part maven, and part salesman, to use Malcolm Gladwell's terms from The Tipping Point. Not everyone is a connector, maven, or salesman.  So those who play these roles, and especially, those who combine more than one of these roles, can function as power knowledge workers, facilitating knowledge flow throughout the organization.


Knowledge managers know how to use KM tools, how to ask others for help, who should be connected to whom, who would benefit from a piece of information, and how to persuade others to use information effectively.  One role of a knowledge manager is subscribing to many information sources, belonging to many communities, and reading many publications, always looking out for what may be useful to others in the organization.

 

Good knowledge managers regularly inform their management colleagues about an article, book, presentation, or con call which was relevant to their areas of responsibility.  These colleagues can subscribe to the same sources and join the same communities, but if not, they will appreciate being selectively alerted when content applies to them.


A KM leader needs to perform the following tasks.

 

1.     Improve business results by institutionalizing a knowledge sharing culture.  With the help of the senior executive and the other leaders in the organization, take steps to achieve a positive culture which rewards caring, sharing, and daring.

 

2.     Define, maintain, and execute the KM implementation plan for the organization.  This is the overall program plan for the KM initiative.

 

3.     Define, communicate, and implement people, process, and technology components for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning.  These are the core elements that enable the KM program.

 

4.     Define KM measurements and rewards for the organization and KM goals for all relevant members.  This aligns individual and organizational objectives.

 

5.     Report regularly on the organization's performance against KM metrics.  This lets the leadership team know how the program is progressing.

 

6.     Implement action plans for people, process, and technology projects.  These are the detailed implementation plans for each project leader.

 

7.     Lead the organization's KM teams.  These include the program staff, the core team, and the KM community.

 

8.     Manage the organization's KM communications.  This keeps all users informed on the program.

 

9.     Actively participate in communities.  Model the desired behaviors by being visible as a leader and member of multiple internal and external communities.

 

10.  Network with other KM Leaders.  Demonstrate the use of social networks to stay current in the field of knowledge management.


Andrew Gent
 

Hello Howard,

>>In one of my more recent client engagements the CKO decided to spend more money on travel than technology.

By that do you mean money for her and her team to travel, or for travel expenses to bring the target audiences of her programs together for face-to-face meetings?

--Andrew


On Thursday, October 2, 2014 1:41 PM, "stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]" wrote:


 
Patti, thanks for your post.  In addition to the SIRCL activities you listed, here are some additional thoughts.

Knowledge management is everyone's responsibility, not just the work of knowledge managers.  But knowledge managers are needed to raise awareness, align knowledge actions with business priorities, promote a knowledge sharing culture, engage senior leadership, manage the infrastructure, and support all knowledge workers.
 
Good knowledge managers are part connector, part maven, and part salesman, to use Malcolm Gladwell's terms from The Tipping Point. Not everyone is a connector, maven, or salesman.  So those who play these roles, and especially, those who combine more than one of these roles, can function as power knowledge workers, facilitating knowledge flow throughout the organization.

Knowledge managers know how to use KM tools, how to ask others for help, who should be connected to whom, who would benefit from a piece of information, and how to persuade others to use information effectively.  One role of a knowledge manager is subscribing to many information sources, belonging to many communities, and reading many publications, always looking out for what may be useful to others in the organization.
 
Good knowledge managers regularly inform their management colleagues about an article, book, presentation, or con call which was relevant to their areas of responsibility.  These colleagues can subscribe to the same sources and join the same communities, but if not, they will appreciate being selectively alerted when content applies to them.

A KM leader needs to perform the following tasks.
 
1.     Improve business results by institutionalizing a knowledge sharing culture.  With the help of the senior executive and the other leaders in the organization, take steps to achieve a positive culture which rewards caring, sharing, and daring.
 
2.     Define, maintain, and execute the KM implementation plan for the organization.  This is the overall program plan for the KM initiative.
 
3.     Define, communicate, and implement people, process, and technology components for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning.  These are the core elements that enable the KM program.
 
4.     Define KM measurements and rewards for the organization and KM goals for all relevant members.  This aligns individual and organizational objectives.
 
5.     Report regularly on the organization's performance against KM metrics.  This lets the leadership team know how the program is progressing.
 
6.     Implement action plans for people, process, and technology projects.  These are the detailed implementation plans for each project leader.
 
7.     Lead the organization's KM teams.  These include the program staff, the core team, and the KM community.
 
8.     Manage the organization's KM communications.  This keeps all users informed on the program.
 
9.     Actively participate in communities.  Model the desired behaviors by being visible as a leader and member of multiple internal and external communities.
 
10.  Network with other KM Leaders.  Demonstrate the use of social networks to stay current in the field of knowledge management.



Dave Simmons
 

1.  Drive for most valued information in an organization
2.  Write once and use many ways
3.  Spot information pain as a KM opportunity
4.  Link all KM content to business metrics
5.  Start small and build both supporters and content (Sinclair "Stealth KM")
6.  Be prepared to speak IT, BusinessSpeak, budget, Content, Process, and HR when addressing KM
7.  Know your constituent's metrics for success.

On Oct 2, 2014 12:41 PM, "stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Patti, thanks for your post.  In addition to the SIRCL activities you listed, here are some additional thoughts.


Knowledge management is everyone's responsibility, not just the work of knowledge managers.  But knowledge managers are needed to raise awareness, align knowledge actions with business priorities, promote a knowledge sharing culture, engage senior leadership, manage the infrastructure, and support all knowledge workers.

 

Good knowledge managers are part connector, part maven, and part salesman, to use Malcolm Gladwell's terms from The Tipping Point. Not everyone is a connector, maven, or salesman.  So those who play these roles, and especially, those who combine more than one of these roles, can function as power knowledge workers, facilitating knowledge flow throughout the organization.


Knowledge managers know how to use KM tools, how to ask others for help, who should be connected to whom, who would benefit from a piece of information, and how to persuade others to use information effectively.  One role of a knowledge manager is subscribing to many information sources, belonging to many communities, and reading many publications, always looking out for what may be useful to others in the organization.

 

Good knowledge managers regularly inform their management colleagues about an article, book, presentation, or con call which was relevant to their areas of responsibility.  These colleagues can subscribe to the same sources and join the same communities, but if not, they will appreciate being selectively alerted when content applies to them.


A KM leader needs to perform the following tasks.

 

1.     Improve business results by institutionalizing a knowledge sharing culture.  With the help of the senior executive and the other leaders in the organization, take steps to achieve a positive culture which rewards caring, sharing, and daring.

 

2.     Define, maintain, and execute the KM implementation plan for the organization.  This is the overall program plan for the KM initiative.

 

3.     Define, communicate, and implement people, process, and technology components for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning.  These are the core elements that enable the KM program.

 

4.     Define KM measurements and rewards for the organization and KM goals for all relevant members.  This aligns individual and organizational objectives.

 

5.     Report regularly on the organization's performance against KM metrics.  This lets the leadership team know how the program is progressing.

 

6.     Implement action plans for people, process, and technology projects.  These are the detailed implementation plans for each project leader.

 

7.     Lead the organization's KM teams.  These include the program staff, the core team, and the KM community.

 

8.     Manage the organization's KM communications.  This keeps all users informed on the program.

 

9.     Actively participate in communities.  Model the desired behaviors by being visible as a leader and member of multiple internal and external communities.

 

10.  Network with other KM Leaders.  Demonstrate the use of social networks to stay current in the field of knowledge management.


Don Kildebeck
 

"Knowledge which matters most, must never be at the mercy of knowledge which matters least."


On Oct 2, 2014, at 10:16 AM, "'Patti Anklam' patti@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

 

My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:

 

·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved

·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative

·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved

·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know

·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information

 

 

Some possible additions:

 

·         Connecting people

·         Working out loud

·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat

 

Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

Patti Anklam

Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

Harvard, MA 01451

+1(978)456-4175

 

 


John Hovell <jhovell@...>
 

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Don Kildebeck dkkildebeck@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

"Knowledge which matters most, must never be at the mercy of knowledge which matters least."


On Oct 2, 2014, at 10:16 AM, "'Patti Anklam' patti@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

 

My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:

 

·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved

·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative

·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved

·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know

·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information

 

 

Some possible additions:

 

·         Connecting people

·         Working out loud

·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat

 

Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

Patti Anklam

Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

Harvard, MA 01451

+1(978)456-4175

 

 



Joe Raimondo
 

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 4:39 PM, John Hovell jhovell@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 


On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Don Kildebeck dkkildebeck@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

"Knowledge which matters most, must never be at the mercy of knowledge which matters least."


On Oct 2, 2014, at 10:16 AM, "'Patti Anklam' patti@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

 

My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:

 

·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved

·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative

·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved

·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know

·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information

 

 

Some possible additions:

 

·         Connecting people

·         Working out loud

·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat

 

Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?

 

Thanks,

 

/patti

 

Patti Anklam

Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks

Harvard, MA 01451

+1(978)456-4175

 

 





--
= Joe Raimondo =
+1 609 790 1757


katepugh@...
 

How about "Always take it to the bank"  (Not to be crass - we can say, "Monetize and show the impact"...)

 
Katrina Pugh
President, AlignConsulting
Author of Sharing Hidden Know-How (Jossey-Bass/Wiley, 2011)
katepugh@...
www.alignconsultinginc.com
617 967 3910 (m)


-----Original Message-----
From: Joe Raimondo joe.raimondo@... [sikmleaders]
To: sikmleaders
Sent: Thu, Oct 2, 2014 4:44 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] 7 Habits of Highly Successful Knowledge Managers

 

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 4:39 PM, John Hovell jhovell@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

On Thu, Oct 2, 2014 at 8:08 PM, Don Kildebeck dkkildebeck@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 
"Knowledge which matters most, must never be at the mercy of knowledge which matters least."


On Oct 2, 2014, at 10:16 AM, "'Patti Anklam' patti@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 
Hi,
 
My client is looking for “7 habits” – I found Stan’s which provide a good starting point:
 
·         Share what you have learned, created, and proved
·         Innovate to be more creative, inventive, imaginative
·         Reuse what others have already learned, created, and proved
·         Collaborate with others to take advantage of what they know
·         Learn by doing, from others, and from existing information
 
 
Some possible additions:
 
·         Connecting people
·         Working out loud
·         Pilot and prototype; refine; repeat
 
Does anyone have their own list of 7 ??? Any other suggestions?
 
Thanks,
 
/patti
 
Patti Anklam
Net Work: Leveraging Content, Knowledge and Networks
Harvard, MA 01451
+1(978)456-4175
 
 




--
= Joe Raimondo =
+1 609 790 1757


Patti Anklam <patti@...>
 

Thanks, all for the suggestions, quotes, and the usual great nuggets. Here is what I am going with (for now):

 

7 Habits of Highly Effective Knowledge Management

 

1.       Share Relentlessly what you have created and what you are learning. Be a role model for those around you.

2.       Search First looking to find, reuse, and refine what others have done before creating something from scratch. Listen to what others are saying.

3.       Communicate, Ask and Answer in the Open using email only when absolutely necessary.  Make your work and your talents discoverable by working out loud. TAG, TAG, TAG what you create so others can find it.

4.       Seek Active Collaboration for tasks both small and large. The sum is always greater than the parts.

5.       Build Social Capital as if it matters as much as financial. Build your personal network and connect people so they can enhance theirs. 

6.       Act on Your Ideas for creating and sharing knowledge.  Leverage company KM resources.

7.       Improve your Knowledge and Skills with KM Tools and Practices by learning one new thing every day (and then go to #1 and share).

 

 

Cheers,

 

/patti

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2014 2:26 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: 7 Habits of Highly Successful Knowledge Managers

 

 

1.  Drive for most valued information in an organization
2.  Write once and use many ways
3.  Spot information pain as a KM opportunity
4.  Link all KM content to business metrics
5.  Start small and build both supporters and content (Sinclair "Stealth KM")
6.  Be prepared to speak IT, BusinessSpeak, budget, Content, Process, and HR when addressing KM
7.  Know your constituent's metrics for success.

On Oct 2, 2014 12:41 PM, "stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Patti, thanks for your post.  In addition to the SIRCL activities you listed, here are some additional thoughts.

 

Knowledge management is everyone's responsibility, not just the work of knowledge managers.  But knowledge managers are needed to raise awareness, align knowledge actions with business priorities, promote a knowledge sharing culture, engage senior leadership, manage the infrastructure, and support all knowledge workers.

 

Good knowledge managers are part connector, part maven, and part salesman, to use Malcolm Gladwell's terms from The Tipping Point. Not everyone is a connector, maven, or salesman.  So those who play these roles, and especially, those who combine more than one of these roles, can function as power knowledge workers, facilitating knowledge flow throughout the organization.

 

Knowledge managers know how to use KM tools, how to ask others for help, who should be connected to whom, who would benefit from a piece of information, and how to persuade others to use information effectively.  One role of a knowledge manager is subscribing to many information sources, belonging to many communities, and reading many publications, always looking out for what may be useful to others in the organization.

 

Good knowledge managers regularly inform their management colleagues about an article, book, presentation, or con call which was relevant to their areas of responsibility.  These colleagues can subscribe to the same sources and join the same communities, but if not, they will appreciate being selectively alerted when content applies to them.

 

A KM leader needs to perform the following tasks.

 

1.     Improve business results by institutionalizing a knowledge sharing culture.  With the help of the senior executive and the other leaders in the organization, take steps to achieve a positive culture which rewards caring, sharing, and daring.

 

2.     Define, maintain, and execute the KM implementation plan for the organization.  This is the overall program plan for the KM initiative.

 

3.     Define, communicate, and implement people, process, and technology components for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning.  These are the core elements that enable the KM program.

 

4.     Define KM measurements and rewards for the organization and KM goals for all relevant members.  This aligns individual and organizational objectives.

 

5.     Report regularly on the organization's performance against KM metrics.  This lets the leadership team know how the program is progressing.

 

6.     Implement action plans for people, process, and technology projects.  These are the detailed implementation plans for each project leader.

 

7.     Lead the organization's KM teams.  These include the program staff, the core team, and the KM community.

 

8.     Manage the organization's KM communications.  This keeps all users informed on the program.

 

9.     Actively participate in communities.  Model the desired behaviors by being visible as a leader and member of multiple internal and external communities.

 

10.  Network with other KM Leaders.  Demonstrate the use of social networks to stay current in the field of knowledge management.