Topics

KM Staffing case #value


Minu Mittal
 

I am building a staffing business case for a Knowledge Resource for a non-profit organization. 


I am building a framework with three pillars of volume of activities, quality of work and strategic objectives. If you have ever created any case/document which put things into perspective. Please pass my way.


All inputs are most welcome. Looking forward to a great discussion. 


Regards,

Minu

Minu Mittal

Global Knowledge Services

 

A.T. Kearney, Inc.

227 West Monroe Street

Chicago, Illinois 60606

United States

+1 312 223 6096 Direct

+1 312 375 3665 Mobile

M.S. from Columbia University New York

Visit my Minu Mittal



Stan Garfield
 

>I am building a staffing business case for a Knowledge Resource for a non-profit organization. 

Do you mean a knowledge management program office?  If so, I can reply with suggestions.  If not, please say a bit more about what you mean by Knowledge Resource.  Thanks.

---In sikmleaders@..., <minumittal93@...> wrote :

I am building a staffing business case for a Knowledge Resource for a non-profit organization. 


I am building a framework with three pillars of volume of activities, quality of work and strategic objectives. If you have ever created any case/document which put things into perspective. Please pass my way.


All inputs are most welcome. Looking forward to a great discussion. 


Regards,

Minu

Minu Mittal

Global Knowledge Services

 

A.T. Kearney, Inc.

227 West Monroe Street

Chicago, Illinois 60606

United States

+1 312 223 6096 Direct

+1 312 375 3665 Mobile

M.S. from Columbia University New York

Visit my Minu Mittal



Minu Mittal
 

Dear Stan, yes it is Knowledge Management Program Office. Here is some more context. We are establishing knowledge capture through Communities of Practice, and we want to build a case that we need one resource in the capacity of facilitator who can align community with strategic objectives and keep the participation going. 

Any job description, ROI, or Volume of activity or quality/productivity analysis would be useful. 

Thanks,
Minu


Patti Anklam <patti@...>
 

Minu,

 

If you are not familiar with the Community Roundtable (http://www.communityroundtable.com) I suggest you head over there and look at some of the reports, as they could provide useful data to support hiring a facilitator (aka community manager). The Value tab under “Community 101” has a number of starting points.

 

/patti anklam

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2014 5:02 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: KM Staffing case

 

 

Dear Stan, yes it is Knowledge Management Program Office. Here is some more context. We are establishing knowledge capture through Communities of Practice, and we want to build a case that we need one resource in the capacity of facilitator who can align community with strategic objectives and keep the participation going. 

 

Any job description, ROI, or Volume of activity or quality/productivity analysis would be useful. 

 

Thanks,

Minu


Stan Garfield
 

You will need to have at least one knowledge manager to lead the KM initiative.  Knowledge management is everyone's responsibility, not just the work of knowledge managers.  But knowledge managers are needed to raise awareness, align knowledge actions with business priorities, promote a knowledge sharing culture, engage senior leadership, manage the infrastructure, and support all knowledge workers.


A knowledge manager should be assigned to lead the KM efforts of an entire organization, or any group within an organization.  In this role, they will be the KM leader for their group.  In the ideal case, this is a full-time job, but in some cases for smaller groups, it may be a part-time role.


A KM leader needs to perform the following tasks.


1.     Improve business results by institutionalizing a knowledge sharing culture.  With the help of the senior executive and the other leaders in the organization, take steps to achieve a positive culture which rewards caring, sharing, and daring.

 

2.     Define, maintain, and execute the KM implementation plan for the organization.  This is the overall program plan for the KM initiative.

 

3.     Define, communicate, and implement people, process, and technology components for learning, sharing, reusing, collaborating, and innovating.  These are the core elements that enable the KM program.

 

4.     Define KM measurements and rewards for the organization and KM goals for all relevant members.  This aligns individual and organizational objectives.

 

5.     Report regularly on the organization's performance against KM metrics.  This lets the leadership team know how the program is progressing.

 

6.     Implement action plans for people, process, and technology projects.  These are the detailed implementation plans for each project leader.

 

7.     Lead the organization's KM teams.  These include the program staff, the core team, and the KM community.

 

8.     Manage the organization's KM communications.  This keeps all users informed on the program.

 

9.     Actively participate in communities.  Model the desired behaviors by being visible as a leader and member of multiple internal and external communities.

 

10.  Network with other KM Leaders.  Demonstrate the use of social networks to stay current in the field of knowledge management.


swieneke@...
 

Minu,

 

I agree with what Stan has suggested (11/14/14). Additionally, the knowledge manager should report to an executive high enough in the organization to provide the necessary autonomy for their role. The knowledge manager needs to have cross functional process literacy ("know their organiation").

Depending on the number of CoPs, please consider additionally creating the role of knowledge asset manager (KAM). The KAM is not a direct report to the knowledge manager. The knowledge manager facilitates a group of KAMs (span of control/communication issue). The CoPs can be grouped in a variety of methods; commentary topics, organizational structure, location within an overall process. Within each CoP group, a KAM is selected preferably by management. The KAMs retain their current organizational responsibilities and additionally become the local go-to-person for knowledge management processes and support. The knowledge manager is responsible for training and communicating knowledge techniques, tools and processes for the KAMs.

 

Regards,

 

Steven Wieneke

Enterprise Learning & Knowledge Awareness Coaching

Wieneke & Wieneke, Inc.

elkawareness.com

Cell: 248.535.0427

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2014 5:02 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: KM Staffing case

 

 

Dear Stan, yes it is Knowledge Management Program Office. Here is some more context. We are establishing knowledge capture through Communities of Practice, and we want to build a case that we need one resource in the capacity of facilitator who can align community with strategic objectives and keep the participation going. 

 

Any job description, ROI, or Volume of activity or quality/productivity analysis would be useful. 

 

Thanks,

Minu


 
Edited

Hi Minu

 

I would like to add to what Steven submitted.  Please look at this attachment for some further insights. I authored this for the old "KM Review" while CKO at this consulting company. Hope this helps.

Aug+KM+Review_BK+KMR+10.4v1.pdf


best

Bill

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2014 10:24
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: KM Staffing case

 

 

Minu,

 

I agree with what Stan has suggested (11/14/14). Additionally, the knowledge manager should report to an executive high enough in the organization to provide the necessary autonomy for their role. The knowledge manager needs to have cross functional process literacy ("know their organiation").

Depending on the number of CoPs, please consider additionally creating the role of knowledge asset manager (KAM). The KAM is not a direct report to the knowledge manager. The knowledge manager facilitates a group of KAMs (span of control/communication issue). The CoPs can be grouped in a variety of methods; commentary topics, organizational structure, location within an overall process. Within each CoP group, a KAM is selected preferably by management. The KAMs retain their current organizational responsibilities and additionally become the local go-to-person for knowledge management processes and support. The knowledge manager is responsible for training and communicating knowledge techniques, tools and processes for the KAMs.

 

Regards,

 

Steven Wieneke

Enterprise Learning & Knowledge Awareness Coaching

Wieneke & Wieneke, Inc.

elkawareness.com

Cell: 248.535.0427

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2014 5:02 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: KM Staffing case

 

 

Dear Stan, yes it is Knowledge Management Program Office. Here is some more context. We are establishing knowledge capture through Communities of Practice, and we want to build a case that we need one resource in the capacity of facilitator who can align community with strategic objectives and keep the participation going. 

 

Any job description, ROI, or Volume of activity or quality/productivity analysis would be useful. 

 

Thanks,

Minu

 


Minu Mittal
 

Thank you so much Steven and Bill for your insightful comments. 

Thanks,
Minu


Minu Mittal
 

Dear Stan, This is really useful. Can you please share any breakdown of time a community manager spent on various activities he performs. 

Our client is looking for some kind of benchmarks as in how many hours job it is, or some real life example of organization having a dedicated *community manager". 

Would really appreciate your insights into this. 
Thanks,
Minu


Stan Garfield
 

Minu, it depends on the type of community manager.  There are several varieties:
  1. A communities of practice program manager
  2. A community manager for a single community of practice
  3. A community manager for an entire Enterprise Social Network (ESN)
  4. A community manager for a single group in an ESN
  5. A community manager for an external community, e.g., a company's followers on Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, or other social media tools
For #1 and #3 in a large organization, a dedicated full-time person is ideal. This person might have additional KM-related duties, but they should be able to focus much of their time on nurturing communities and/or the ESN.

For #2 and #4, the role can be part-time, depending on the size, activity level, and importance of the community or group.

For #5, it depends on the size of the company and the number of tools being used. At least one full-time person, and possibly many more, will ensure that the desired channels are being monitored, responses are being posted, and regular content updates are being made.


Minu Mittal
 

Great, Thanks for the detailed reply Stan.