A Knowledge Curator? #roles #curation


andregalitsky@...
 

In a recent issue of the New Yorker, there is an article about Hans Ulrich Obrist, a modern art curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London.  He spends his days travelling around the world, connecting with artists, curators, and critics - looking for artists who are creating new and important pieces of artwork (and most of them are not paintings).


Just wondering if the same concept applies to KM..  Is there a role for a Knowledge Curator at a large distributed organization -  a person whose job it is to find important pieces of knowledge (and people who create it), analyze it, and add it to the KM gallery, so to speak?



P.S. Here's the New Yorker article link:  Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps

 


Gary Riccio
 

Yes! Probably in the same organizations that are considering open innovation, strategic sourcing, or otherwise venturing beyond familiar value networks.


On Dec 21, 2014, at 1:54 PM, andregalitsky@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


In a recent issue of the New Yorker, there is an article about Hans Ulrich Obrist, a modern art curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London.  He spends his days travelling around the world, connecting with artists, curators, and critics - looking for artists who are creating new and important pieces of artwork (and most of them are not paintings).


Just wondering if the same concept applies to KM..  Is there a role for a Knowledge Curator at a large distributed organization -  a person whose job it is to find important pieces of knowledge (and people who create it), analyze it, and add it to the KM gallery, so to speak?



P.S. Here's the New Yorker article link:  Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps

 



Murray Jennex
 

I agree with the below as while I think a knowledge curator is a great idea, I can see where organizations won't support it because it will be difficult to show the value in having such a position.  To answer my unspoken question on showing value I will say that organizations that rely of intellectual property (such as a Qualcomm or the organizational types mentioned below) probably have such a person but calls them something else and has measures in place to judge how well they are doing.  I think smaller organizations would probably include internal knowledge curator duties as a part of the job of CKO or KM leader or whatever they call the position....murray
 

In a message dated 12/21/2014 5:43:07 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


Yes! Probably in the same organizations that are considering open innovation, strategic sourcing, or otherwise venturing beyond familiar value networks.


On Dec 21, 2014, at 1:54 PM, andregalitsky@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


In a recent issue of the New Yorker, there is an article about Hans Ulrich Obrist, a modern art curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London.  He spends his days travelling around the world, connecting with artists, curators, and critics - looking for artists who are creating new and important pieces of artwork (and most of them are not paintings).


Just wondering if the same concept applies to KM..  Is there a role for a Knowledge Curator at a large distributed organization -  a person whose job it is to find important pieces of knowledge (and people who create it), analyze it, and add it to the KM gallery, so to speak?



P.S. Here's the New Yorker article link:  Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps


 



Halupka, Jacqueline (CA - Toronto) <jhalupka@...>
 

Deloitte US is piloting a Knowledge Curator program, in which the KMs work with leaders to designate a practitioner as a Knowledge Curator in a specific line of business. The Curators will be asked to spend a small proportion of their time working with KM to collect and evaluate content and to create content where gaps exist. We realize that the program’s success will depend completely on leadership support. However we are feeling positive now, and hope to have good reports next year.
 
Jacqueline Halupka
Senior Manager | Global Knowledge Services | Consulting Strategy & Operations
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
2 Queen Street East,  Toronto, ON  M5C 3G7
Tel/Direct 416-643-8071 | Mobile 416-525-9190
 
 
 

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John Hovell <jhovell@...>
 

Thanks for sharing, and asking. In the defense industry, BAE Systems is piloting a similar program, and Lockheed Martin has also been running a similar program for several years with success. I'm sure several other defense contractors are right there as well.

In my own humble opinion, I think this knowledge curator type of role is everyone's role, as opposed to a traditional full time employee type of role. I'd like to think the curator designation is a nice step toward full time learning and collaborative organizations.

Thanks,
John



On Dec 22, 2014, at 8:57 AM, 'Halupka, Jacqueline (CA - Toronto)' jhalupka@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Deloitte US is piloting a Knowledge Curator program, in which the KMs work with leaders to designate a practitioner as a Knowledge Curator in a specific line of business. The Curators will be asked to spend a small proportion of their time working with KM to collect and evaluate content and to create content where gaps exist. We realize that the program’s success will depend completely on leadership support. However we are feeling positive now, and hope to have good reports next year.
 
Jacqueline Halupka
Senior Manager | Global Knowledge Services | Consulting Strategy & Operations
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
2 Queen Street East,  Toronto, ON  M5C 3G7
Tel/Direct 416-643-8071 | Mobile 416-525-9190
 
 
 

Confidentiality Warning: 

This message and any attachments are intended only for the use of the intended recipient(s), are confidential, and may be privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, conversion to hard copy, copying, circulation or other use of this message and any attachments is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by return e-mail, and delete this message and any attachments from your system. Thank You

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Cory Banks
 

Didn't we used to call these roles Librarians?

:)


On 23 December 2014 at 00:17, John Hovell jhovell@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Thanks for sharing, and asking. In the defense industry, BAE Systems is piloting a similar program, and Lockheed Martin has also been running a similar program for several years with success. I'm sure several other defense contractors are right there as well.

In my own humble opinion, I think this knowledge curator type of role is everyone's role, as opposed to a traditional full time employee type of role. I'd like to think the curator designation is a nice step toward full time learning and collaborative organizations.

Thanks,
John



On Dec 22, 2014, at 8:57 AM, 'Halupka, Jacqueline (CA - Toronto)' jhalupka@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Deloitte US is piloting a Knowledge Curator program, in which the KMs work with leaders to designate a practitioner as a Knowledge Curator in a specific line of business. The Curators will be asked to spend a small proportion of their time working with KM to collect and evaluate content and to create content where gaps exist. We realize that the program’s success will depend completely on leadership support. However we are feeling positive now, and hope to have good reports next year.
 
Jacqueline Halupka
Senior Manager | Global Knowledge Services | Consulting Strategy & Operations
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
2 Queen Street East,  Toronto, ON  M5C 3G7
Tel/Direct 416-643-8071 | Mobile 416-525-9190
 
 
 

Confidentiality Warning: 

This message and any attachments are intended only for the use of the intended recipient(s), are confidential, and may be privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, conversion to hard copy, copying, circulation or other use of this message and any attachments is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by return e-mail, and delete this message and any attachments from your system. Thank You

If you do not wish to receive future commercial electronic messages from Deloitte, forward this email to unsubscribe@...

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Ce message, ainsi que toutes ses pièces jointes, est destiné exclusivement au(x) destinataire(s) prévu(s), est confidentiel et peut contenir des renseignements privilégiés. Si vous n’êtes pas le destinataire prévu de ce message, nous vous avisons par la présente que la modification, la retransmission, la conversion en format papier, la reproduction, la diffusion ou toute autre utilisation de ce message et de ses pièces jointes sont strictement interdites. Si vous n’êtes pas le destinataire prévu, veuillez en aviser immédiatement l’expéditeur en répondant à ce courriel et supprimez ce message et toutes ses pièces jointes de votre système. Merci.

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Albert Simard
 

And the difference between a knowledge curator and what a 21st century librarian should be is???   You might wish to check out:

 

http://www.slideshare.net/albertsimard/wherefore-libraries

 

I was trying to get librarians to reduce their budgetary hemorrhage by shifting from an abstract “cost center” to a core business service.  Unfortunately most listeners couldn’t get past “managing collections.”  In the Global Disaster Information Network, we referred to the functions of a global  “knowledge facilitator.”  Some people have also used the phrase “knowledge Broker.”  Both of these terms suggest more than managing knowledge assets.

 

Great analogy, but it is somewhat narrow in terms of what KM should be.

 


chuck georgo <chuck@...>
 

I am not enamored with the term “curator” – it sounds like someone that cares for stuff you aren’t allowed to hold, touch, or play with; however, I do like the term “Knowledge Coach” – someone who helps to develop the skills in individuals that Cory describes, to help provide oversight of the organization’s KM program that Jaqueline is piloting to ensure that it is actually achieving the real-world effects (outcomes) that the investment in KM practices intended to achieve.

 

Considering the rate of staff turnover and realignment within organizations, the changes in mission needs, products, and services, and the challenges in considering and implementing the wide-range of technology tools available to enhance human knowledge consumption and production, I think you can keep the Knowledge Coach busy full-time+… J

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2014 9:34 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] A Knowledge Curator?

 

 

Didn't we used to call these roles Librarians?

 

:)


 

On 23 December 2014 at 00:17, John Hovell jhovell@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for sharing, and asking. In the defense industry, BAE Systems is piloting a similar program, and Lockheed Martin has also been running a similar program for several years with success. I'm sure several other defense contractors are right there as well.

 

In my own humble opinion, I think this knowledge curator type of role is everyone's role, as opposed to a traditional full time employee type of role. I'd like to think the curator designation is a nice step toward full time learning and collaborative organizations.

 

Thanks,

John




On Dec 22, 2014, at 8:57 AM, 'Halupka, Jacqueline (CA - Toronto)' jhalupka@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Deloitte US is piloting a Knowledge Curator program, in which the KMs work with leaders to designate a practitioner as a Knowledge Curator in a specific line of business. The Curators will be asked to spend a small proportion of their time working with KM to collect and evaluate content and to create content where gaps exist. We realize that the program’s success will depend completely on leadership support. However we are feeling positive now, and hope to have good reports next year.

 

Jacqueline Halupka
Senior Manager | Global Knowledge Services | Consulting Strategy & Operations
Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited
2 Queen Street East,  Toronto, ON  M5C 3G7

Tel/Direct 416-643-8071 | Mobile 416-525-9190

 

 

 

Confidentiality Warning: 

This message and any attachments are intended only for the use of the intended recipient(s), are confidential, and may be privileged. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any review, retransmission, conversion to hard copy, copying, circulation or other use of this message and any attachments is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by return e-mail, and delete this message and any attachments from your system. Thank You

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Ce message, ainsi que toutes ses pièces jointes, est destiné exclusivement au(x) destinataire(s) prévu(s), est confidentiel et peut contenir des renseignements privilégiés. Si vous n’êtes pas le destinataire prévu de ce message, nous vous avisons par la présente que la modification, la retransmission, la conversion en format papier, la reproduction, la diffusion ou toute autre utilisation de ce message et de ses pièces jointes sont strictement interdites. Si vous n’êtes pas le destinataire prévu, veuillez en aviser immédiatement l’expéditeur en répondant à ce courriel et supprimez ce message et toutes ses pièces jointes de votre système. Merci.

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tman9999@...
 

In my opinion, the idea of having a single, designated knowledge curator could make sense for a focused community that has an agreed taxonomy, a large trove of content, and a fairly high velocity of new content to manage. Formal curator roles include managing existing content according to a document lifecycle policy that calls out things like aging, archiving, and tagging/categorizing. It may also include access rights management. This, to me, is "old school." That doesn't mean it's no longer useful, or valid. But neither is it the only form of curation available to enterprises in an era of the enterprise social intranet. 

I prefer to think of curation as "everyone's job." 

Let's say you're surfing the web and you an article or site that you think might be of interest to a colleague, what do you do with it? 
a) send it to them - assuming you know who they are
b) ignore it - because you have a suspicion *someone* would probably find it useful, but you have no idea who
c) tag it or otherwise make it available to a known community on your social intranet where the people who would likely find it of interest tend to hang out.

If your intranet isn't capable of supporting choice (c) then you may be left with no option other than the formal curation approach. On the other hand, if you have a true social intranet then putting the item out there for others to consume, whether you know who they are or not, is an option worth pursuing. 

Tom Short
Social Strategy Consultant
Jive Software


Murray Jennex
 

I agree it is everyone's job and in a case study I did with a nuclear engineering organization the most common reason for adding something to the knowledge base was "I think it is a good idea"  That said there are a couple of problems with having everyone do it:
 
the first is that is isn't the engineer's job (or anyone's) to look for knowledge.  in the case study knowledge was found and added in the course of doing the regular job.  Most managers/supervisors do not want their people to just look for knowledge unless it happens in the course of doing regular work.  On the plus side the knowledge that is found does relate specifically to work done in the organization.
 
the second is that most employees are not privy to or aware of the long term strategy of the organization or what the total organization does or needs.  This is the value of having someone, perhaps as a function of a strategic planning group, to identify and capture knowledge for the organization that will be needed in that future.
 
the danger is that this look a head for knowledge is usually not considered critical unless you are in an organization that derives its income from managing and licensing knowledge or through innovation in new products and services. These people can be the first to be cut in times of economic difficulty, hence my previous focus on showing value.
 
This actually goes back to the older discussion of how an organization manages innovation and new technology, do they let the worker level people do it or do they focus it in a special group?
 
Ultimately I think a knowledge and learning organization will have both roles, the individual workers finding and adding knowledge that relates to their specific job areas (tactical level knowledge) and a person or small group doing the look a head knowledge identification and capture for strategic initiatives (strategic level knowledge) and yes, for many organizations I think both levels of knowledge exists.....murray jennex
 
 

In a message dated 12/22/2014 11:31:40 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


In my opinion, the idea of having a single, designated knowledge curator could make sense for a focused community that has an agreed taxonomy, a large trove of content, and a fairly high velocity of new content to manage. Formal curator roles include managing existing content according to a document lifecycle policy that calls out things like aging, archiving, and tagging/categorizing. It may also include access rights management. This, to me, is "old school." That doesn't mean it's no longer useful, or valid. But neither is it the only form of curation available to enterprises in an era of the enterprise social intranet. 

I prefer to think of curation as "everyone's job." 

Let's say you're surfing the web and you an article or site that you think might be of interest to a colleague, what do you do with it? 
a) send it to them - assuming you know who they are
b) ignore it - because you have a suspicion *someone* would probably find it useful, but you have no idea who
c) tag it or otherwise make it available to a known community on your social intranet where the people who would likely find it of interest tend to hang out.

If your intranet isn't capable of supporting choice (c) then you may be left with no option other than the formal curation approach. On the other hand, if you have a true social intranet then putting the item out there for others to consume, whether you know who they are or not, is an option worth pursuing. 

Tom Short
Social Strategy Consultant
Jive Software


Maria Brindlmayer
 

In my previous company (professional services), knowledge broker roles existed. However, they were not full-time. They identified knew key "knowledge". Their main role was still to serve clients but they were given a certain % of time (5-10%) with a KM charge code. The benefit of this role was that these brokers were involved every day in the latest client service activities and had their finger on the pulse of new trends. And since it was only a small percent of their time, it was financially feasible to have more of them throughout the organization. There can be downsides, e.g., it is sometimes difficult to carve out the time for KM activities when the pressure to provide client service is very high. There were also full-time KM managers who had a more formalized role to manage the knowledge "inventory" (e.g., editing or archiving).

I agree with earlier postings that it is everyone's job to do knowledge sharing (e.g., sharing articles or an interesting finding on a project), but I believe that a dedicated role is key for certain types of knowledge to make sure that the information can be relied on by everyone (e.g., interpretation of a certain tax code).  

Thus, I think that the best models use a combination of different roles (including communities of practice) for different types of knowledge, and make it easy for everyone to share knowledge.

Best,
Maria



On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 3:11 PM, murphjen@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I agree it is everyone's job and in a case study I did with a nuclear engineering organization the most common reason for adding something to the knowledge base was "I think it is a good idea"  That said there are a couple of problems with having everyone do it:
 
the first is that is isn't the engineer's job (or anyone's) to look for knowledge.  in the case study knowledge was found and added in the course of doing the regular job.  Most managers/supervisors do not want their people to just look for knowledge unless it happens in the course of doing regular work.  On the plus side the knowledge that is found does relate specifically to work done in the organization.
 
the second is that most employees are not privy to or aware of the long term strategy of the organization or what the total organization does or needs.  This is the value of having someone, perhaps as a function of a strategic planning group, to identify and capture knowledge for the organization that will be needed in that future.
 
the danger is that this look a head for knowledge is usually not considered critical unless you are in an organization that derives its income from managing and licensing knowledge or through innovation in new products and services. These people can be the first to be cut in times of economic difficulty, hence my previous focus on showing value.
 
This actually goes back to the older discussion of how an organization manages innovation and new technology, do they let the worker level people do it or do they focus it in a special group?
 
Ultimately I think a knowledge and learning organization will have both roles, the individual workers finding and adding knowledge that relates to their specific job areas (tactical level knowledge) and a person or small group doing the look a head knowledge identification and capture for strategic initiatives (strategic level knowledge) and yes, for many organizations I think both levels of knowledge exists.....murray jennex
 
 
In a message dated 12/22/2014 11:31:40 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


In my opinion, the idea of having a single, designated knowledge curator could make sense for a focused community that has an agreed taxonomy, a large trove of content, and a fairly high velocity of new content to manage. Formal curator roles include managing existing content according to a document lifecycle policy that calls out things like aging, archiving, and tagging/categorizing. It may also include access rights management. This, to me, is "old school." That doesn't mean it's no longer useful, or valid. But neither is it the only form of curation available to enterprises in an era of the enterprise social intranet. 

I prefer to think of curation as "everyone's job." 

Let's say you're surfing the web and you an article or site that you think might be of interest to a colleague, what do you do with it? 
a) send it to them - assuming you know who they are
b) ignore it - because you have a suspicion *someone* would probably find it useful, but you have no idea who
c) tag it or otherwise make it available to a known community on your social intranet where the people who would likely find it of interest tend to hang out.

If your intranet isn't capable of supporting choice (c) then you may be left with no option other than the formal curation approach. On the other hand, if you have a true social intranet then putting the item out there for others to consume, whether you know who they are or not, is an option worth pursuing. 

Tom Short
Social Strategy Consultant
Jive Software




--
---------------------------------------------------
Maria Brindlmayer
cell: 202-365-2440


Mark Zoeckler
 

At BCG, we believe strongly in this concept, but not necessarily with a knowledge curator as an individual, more typically as topic teams collaborating with supporting knowledge shared services. 

On Sun, Dec 21, 2014 at 10:54 AM, andregalitsky@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

In a recent issue of the New Yorker, there is an article about Hans Ulrich Obrist, a modern art curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London.  He spends his days travelling around the world, connecting with artists, curators, and critics - looking for artists who are creating new and important pieces of artwork (and most of them are not paintings).


Just wondering if the same concept applies to KM..  Is there a role for a Knowledge Curator at a large distributed organization -  a person whose job it is to find important pieces of knowledge (and people who create it), analyze it, and add it to the KM gallery, so to speak?



P.S. Here's the New Yorker article link:  Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps

Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps
D. T. Max profiles Hans Ulrich Obrist, of London’s Serpentine Gallery. He “seems less to stand atop the art world than to race around, up, over, and through it.”
Preview by Yahoo

 



andregalitsky@...
 

Thank you all for your thoughtful and wide-ranging replies - there's a lot to think about here... I appreciate your feedback and comments - this is very insightful! 


Stuart French <sjfrenc@...>
 

Sounds like the ultimate job to me.  I did a little bit of it in my last role and loved it, but to find value through cross-pollination and collaboration through an organisation, full time with exec sponsorship would be awesome.

Kind Regards,

 

Stuart French

Knowledge Strategy Consultant

Ph : +61 (0) 411 797-781

stuart@...


On 22 Dec 2014, at 5:54 am, andregalitsky@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

In a recent issue of the New Yorker, there is an article about Hans Ulrich Obrist, a modern art curator at the Serpentine Gallery in London.  He spends his days travelling around the world, connecting with artists, curators, and critics - looking for artists who are creating new and important pieces of artwork (and most of them are not paintings).


Just wondering if the same concept applies to KM..  Is there a role for a Knowledge Curator at a large distributed organization -  a person whose job it is to find important pieces of knowledge (and people who create it), analyze it, and add it to the KM gallery, so to speak?



P.S. Here's the New Yorker article link:  Hans Ulrich Obrist, the Curator Who Never Sleeps

 


Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Andre and forum members,

 

I apologise or answering this late, but I hope the comment adds a little more to an already interesting thread.

In some ways Stan has been the voluntary “Knowledge Curator” by hosting and leading this forum for about 15 years.

This volunteer network connects people across organisations with each other and with ideas/options/content/concepts/contexts… you get the idea…

 

The difficulty with doing this within a business is one has to “justify your existence”, which is fine, however has challenges some do not comprehend or appreciate. As connectors (knowledge curators) of people and concepts the value we stimulate is usually through the application of (either newly created or adapted) knowledge that arises and is reapplied as a result of connections made and insights gained.  This means that the value creation of a curator’s efforts happens in someone else’s budget area, making KM a cost centre (I prefer investment) rather than a revenue generation centre.  When the economy gets tight, the cost centres get cut in favour of revenue generation, thereby making knowledge development activities discontinuous, making long term sustainable difficult to highlight.  Those doing the cutting are not aware of the catalyst impacts of the connectors as they are primarily observing tangible aspects for a distance without knowing what caused them t occur.  Without catalysing relationships, less ideas get shared and reapplied (both through social relationships and other sharing processes or tools), which ultimately reduces competitive advantage, innovation and overall performance.

 

The concept of a knowledge catalyst worked very well during my involvement in a large international organisation. We (semi) jokingly referred to ourselves as the “corporate dating service”.  There were many very significant projects that generated a LOT of measurable value across the organisation. These would never have occurred without knowledge curators catalysing connections and relationships. Our very presence changed the dynamics, mindsets, focus and flow of the organisation.  Imagine making a cake by just throwing the ingredients in and cooking without “informed mixing…” 

When Grandma makes it from experience it is magnificent.  Yet when the inexperienced recipe cook makes it following the formula, it can be rather ordinary. 

 

Knowledge curators matter!  Not because they know or have a lot of “stuff”, but because they shift mindsets and connect people in ways that content, tools and processes simply can’t.

Just consider how much value you have received over the years from the interactions in this forum (or others like it such as KM4 Dev or ActKM and the various local KM communities you interact with).

Now imagine how much more difficult and less rewarding your role would be if Stan and others did not invest time and effort “curating and catalysing”.

I believe that organisations that have this (formally or informally) benefit enormously - whether they measure it or not.

In my experience, leaders that leverage this generate more sustainable performance (and these do exist if you look around at the top performers in some industries).

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

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From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Saturday, 3 January 2015 12:41 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: A Knowledge Curator?

 

 

Thank you all for your thoughtful and wide-ranging replies - there's a lot to think about here... I appreciate your feedback and comments - this is very insightful!