Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles #expertise-location #profiles


darin.hawley@...
 

No, but I got it into the scope of a funded project recently... before it was unfunded. I'm persistent, ask me again in a year. :) 


Howie Cohen
 

Out of your experience has any one organization **no names needed** achieved a totally integrated and centralized profile capability that leverages ESN and HR information for both incoming and outgoing data?   

On Sun, Mar 29, 2015 at 5:45 PM, yahoo@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I agree.  Employees need to maintain their profiles, but there should also be updates that come from others (e.g., HR) as their internal roles change due to promotion, reorganization, etc.  However, collecting all this information in one place is only helpful if it gets searched often and people find the experts they are looking for.  Tracking access is also important.

Furthermore, you can set up a system that when person 1 accesses an expert that person 1 gets to give the expert feedback on how helpful they are.  The company can then reward experts that get asked a lot and/or get great feedback.  Over time, one can monitor who is giving out the most/best advice and perhaps start to assign people to different expertise areas and even build into their workload some time throughout the year to be available to help others.

Steve



yahoo@...
 

I agree.  Employees need to maintain their profiles, but there should also be updates that come from others (e.g., HR) as their internal roles change due to promotion, reorganization, etc.  However, collecting all this information in one place is only helpful if it gets searched often and people find the experts they are looking for.  Tracking access is also important.

Furthermore, you can set up a system that when person 1 accesses an expert that person 1 gets to give the expert feedback on how helpful they are.  The company can then reward experts that get asked a lot and/or get great feedback.  Over time, one can monitor who is giving out the most/best advice and perhaps start to assign people to different expertise areas and even build into their workload some time throughout the year to be available to help others.

Steve


 

Howie, et al.

I've been working with various companies for a number of years, helping them integrate enterprise social networking platforms into their organizational fabric.   Most ESNs have a robust feature - rich profiles - user profile areas that have become more of a "LinkedIn" kind of experience.   Most ESNs integrate with existing corporate directory infrastructures so that all the basics are exposed (identity, location, reporting structure, etc).  But new ESN rich profiles help employees create a more personalized view of themselves on the network.  The features of rich profiles supports the ability of individuals to highlight their knowledge capital - their skills & expertise, recent or featured work, their own blog material, as well as their social capital - who they're connected to and following, their networks, and their own affiliations (i.e., internal communities of practice or groups they belong to) not just their position in the org-chart. 

There are adoption challenges with rich profiles in ESNs.
1.   Users are unsure of governance in this area (i.e., their information has always been in corporate directories, information they haven't had control of, so they are unsure of how to behave when they can manage their own profiles).
2.   Leaders don't lead by example very well in this area
3.   Engaging in this way is not built into incentives or management support

Some companies use gamification efforts to underpin user adoption efforts and engaging users with rich profiles is also often part of wider ESN adoption and engagement programs.

Companies typically roll out ESNs, for instance, to help foster more collaborative capacities in their organizations.   But what is often not well understood is the strategic value of turning one's entire organization into a network.   Network behaviors and capacities will allow companies and workers to be more agile and nimble, and gain access to knowledge and social capital through other mechanisms that traditional hierarchical and cross-functional information and knowledge flows.  Here is some material I developed in slideshare that gives some of the concepts. -- http://www.slideshare.net/CatherinePaloAlto/network-mindset-mindsets-skills-social-structures2015

For me there are profiles fall into one of three categories I'm doing a lot of thinking about "NetWorking"
  • Network Asset - the individual exposing their own talents to the network, and engaging in the network to find others  (LinkedIn has taught professionals how to do this external to organizations).
  • NetWorker Skills - skills that are important to develop and incent to enable effective work in networks
  • Network-based social structures - Knowledge networks, communities of practice, working-out-loud transparency, crowdsourcing


These days, when one is thinking about profiles I think it needs to be thought of in the context of how it will help a company or organization function as a powerful network.

Catherine




On Sun, Mar 29, 2015 at 6:51 AM, darin.hawley@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Absolutely agree. Make it easy for employees to maintain their own information and create incentives for driving quality. Make the information visible by including people in enterprise search results. Communicate success stories of people making connections based on profile data, and run campaigns to push toward critical mass.




--
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Twitter: @catshinners  |  Skype: CatherinePaloAlto

Social Business Strategic Consulting and Enterprise 2.0 Services


darin.hawley@...
 

Absolutely agree. Make it easy for employees to maintain their own information and create incentives for driving quality. Make the information visible by including people in enterprise search results. Communicate success stories of people making connections based on profile data, and run campaigns to push toward critical mass.


Howie Cohen
 

Chris,  

          I am happy to talk to you about this.  I will have some time next week, we can set up a call.   Are you going to APQC by chance? 

Howie 

On Fri, Mar 27, 2015 at 5:23 PM, cmacomber@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hello Howie,

Encouraging companies to finally put effort into understanding their most important asset, their people, is often harder than it should be, so congrats!  First, some full disclosure, I'm the CEO of WhoKnows, and we have a platform that addresses exactly the problem you're facing, so I apologize if this comes across as a sales pitch.  However, I honestly believe this could be a case where the product is the best answer to a question.

Basically, we have built a machine learning platform to automatically consolidate existing profiles and then analyze online content and work activity to automatically build a private network of expertise and relationships.  All of this is done with a focus on the employee's privacy, and over 90% of our users now have up-to-date comprehensive profiles about what they know.  We're already deployed at multiple F500 and mid-market companies and have passed numerous privacy and security audits across the world.

Rather than continue pitching on the forum, feel free to reach out to me at chris@... if you'd like to hear more!

Cheers,
Chris



Albert Simard
 

In our experience, the largest hurdles that must be overcome are consistency, currency, and completeness.

 

·         Consistency: Different systems and individuals will use variations in terminology for the same thing.  Humans, being human, also make mistakes when inserting data.  These require some sort of error checking, editorial review, and/or mapping between terminology variations. 

·         Currency: Organizational directories are frequently out of date or incorrect, particularly for temporary situations.  Individuals are in the best position to know their current situation.  But there must be a simple process in place for them to correct outdated or incorrect organizational data.

·         Completeness:  A critical mass of individuals must be sufficiently engaged to participate, access, and review their data on a regular basis.  Although 100% participation is not achievable (even in the military!) once a critical mass is achieved (75%+, IMHO), those who don’t play in the sandbox will be gradually marginalized.  


cmacomber@...
 

Hello Howie,
Encouraging companies to finally put effort into understanding their most important asset, their people, is often harder than it should be, so congrats!  First, some full disclosure, I'm the CEO of WhoKnows, and we have a platform that addresses exactly the problem you're facing, so I apologize if this comes across as a sales pitch.  However, I honestly believe this could be a case where the product is the best answer to a question.

Basically, we have built a machine learning platform to automatically consolidate existing profiles and then analyze online content and work activity to automatically build a private network of expertise and relationships.  All of this is done with a focus on the employee's privacy, and over 90% of our users now have up-to-date comprehensive profiles about what they know.  We're already deployed at multiple F500 and mid-market companies and have passed numerous privacy and security audits across the world.

Rather than continue pitching on the forum, feel free to reach out to me at chris@... if you'd like to hear more!

Cheers,
Chris


vs_shenoy@...
 

Howie,

There are multiple ways to consolidate people information in an organization but would still require the user to provide the most relevant information (like LinkedIn profiles) about expertise, though some information can be provisioned from staffing profiles and content shared on an asset management system. This has been done on SharePoint but requires customization and ideally having most of the information on a single platform. Stan Garfield and Lee Romero can share greater details of how this is done at Deloitte using a people profiles network. Ideally greater voluntary contribution of information enables stronger connections between people and information. 

I am not sure I understand what the scope of your analysis is? 

Thanks,
Vinod


darin.hawley@...
 

Hello! I've been lurking here since last fall when I attended my first KM World conference and Stan Garfield's Knowledge Management 101 workshop. I've worked as an Enterprise Architect at Cargill for several years and have recently taken an interest raising my skills (and my company's maturity) in Knowledge Management. This is a topic area I know a bit about, so I thought I would finally jump in and share some of my thoughts.

 

I agreed with Alice that the most appropriate pattern is probably a data warehouse. No single system is going to be the master for all profile information, each is (or should be) authoritative for a subset of elements. Cargill has an HR data warehouse, but it doesn't currently contain a full set of profile information the way you described. Alternatively, and ambitiously, you could develop a central profile management system that becomes the front end for each of these backend systems. That would have the added benefit of solving the end user problem of having to maintain or request changes to profile information in multiple places.

 

I'm curious to know what analysis you'd like to do and how it relates to knowledge management. I am personally fascinated by identity data and how it enables us to find and relate to our colleagues more effectively. I can't tell you what a boon it has been for me to have Lync presence for scanning the role and org context of someone I'm addressing in a conversation, or being able to search for keywords and find PEOPLE in SharePoint who have matching items in their profile.

 

What I really wish I had, and perhaps what you're after, is visualizing the workforce along several dimensions (e.g. job function, employment type, level of experience, managerial level, geographical distribution). I would like to develop several personas based on this segmentation analysis that would help provide more targeted services.

 

Hope this is helpful, cheers!




Alice MacGillivray <alice@...>
 

Good morning Howard. I was faced with a similar challenge many years ago (so the technologies have changed but perhaps the principles have not). In my case, I wanted staff to be able to easily run useful ad hoc reports about pieces of land they were managing. So in this case, it was those properties—rather than people—that required data integration/

The technology of the time was a data warehouse. In many cases, data (about risks, facilities, visitors, visitor satisfaction, etc.) were already associated with an ID for the piece of land (as people’s names would be). In some cases, we integrated spatial data too, but you probably wouldn’t need to do that.

The warehouse environment made this possible (as subsequent web tools would). I hired a DBA to do fairly minimal work between the back and front ends when things didn’t work quite right. I initially used a clunky tool and then moved to Oracle Discoverer (doubt it exists now but the name is pretty descriptive).

We had no big confidentiality issues. Only staff accessed the data and none of it required special clearances.

We had several ongoing management questions and decisions so I set up reports to answer those questions and help with decisions. People could customize those reports (for example for the 13 pieces of land they managed or for all properties with high fire hazards). 

One of the interesting things about this project was that I wasn’t a techie, though I sure climbed up a learning curve to the point where the IT folks wanted me working for them. I had to do a lot of people-research to even learn this was possible. When I finally met the person who understood (a CMA in a finance shop elsewhere in government) he said “I’ve been waiting 4 years for someone from your department to ask this question.”

Field staff and executives were both very supportive of the results, which was a rare occurrence! 

This may not sound like a KM initiative, but I believe it was a very successful one. The technology was used to stimulate and support dialogue, decision making and innovations by diverse groups of staff. It really helped people see their work in a larger context. Some of this work happened in an annual process we had developed, but for many the tool was used increasingly to get better context for day-to-day work. 

Perhaps there are some ideas here that can be adapted for your setting?

Alice

Alice MacGillivray, PhD

Please think before you print.





Harman Jon GBJH <jon.harman@...>
 

I looked at various systems (e.g. Metasight from The Morphix Company) for generating user profiles several years ago.  They did this by looking at titles of emails that people sent and received and so deduced the interests and likely skills of that person.  As you can imagine there were many data protection concerns at that time and probably still would be now.  However, the world is moving this way – Amazon knows what I am interested in because of my activity on its site.   

 

I would recommend that the profiles are stored in one central place, such as Sharepoint profiles, and then other systems look up on this. 

 

Jon Harman
R&D Networks and Knowledge Management Team

Networks & Learning Lead

Office: Jealott's Hill, Building 89/8
Phone: +44 (0)1344 41 3868     
Mobile: +44 (0)77383 12889                         
e-mail: jon.harman@...  

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: 20 March 2015 14:31
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Enterprise Patterns of User Profiles

 

 

Good Morning SIKM! 


            One of the best things about working in this space is there is always something to learn.  I am thinking about a challenge that I haven't had to deal with before and I wonder if any of you have experience or advice for me.   

 

We have a number of systems that have user profile information.  For example, a talent management system will have name, address, image, uid etc. and a CMS SharePoint or other could house the same kind of data but in many cases a user will have to update this information themselves.    I have seen some enterprise service patterns that use LDAP to feed certain data to various systems but I am curious if there is a system or capability that itself is an enterprise resource to provision enterprise user information.   The other question is that would this same system or capability be able to ! compose or pull content from other systems to perform some analysis.    What are your thoughts or experiences?  

 

Best, 
Howie 




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Howie Cohen
 

Good Morning SIKM! 

One of the best things about working in this space is there is always something to learn.  I am thinking about a challenge that I haven't had to deal with before and I wonder if any of you have experience or advice for me.   

We have a number of systems that have user profile information.  For example, a talent management system will have name, address, image, uid etc. and a CMS SharePoint or other could house the same kind of data but in many cases a user will have to update this information themselves.    I have seen some enterprise service patterns that use LDAP to feed certain data to various systems but I am curious if there is a system or capability that itself is an enterprise resource to provision enterprise user information.   The other question is that would this same system or capability be able to compose or pull content from other systems to perform some analysis.    What are your thoughts or experiences?  

Best, 
Howie