Knowledge Organisation Competency Framework Survey #roles #expertise #survey


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Apologies for the cross-posting

Some of us involved with the Innovations in Knowledge Organisation conference in Singapore are working on a competency framework for knowledge organisation (i.e. taxonomies, ontologies, thesauri, etc). We have put together a brief survey that might be of interest to you.

The survey can be found here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/kocompetencies

All responses will be treated anonymously and participants will receive aggregated survey results but only if they request it.


Some background info here:
Article: http://www.greenchameleon.com/uploads/Matt_Moore_v1.pdf
Slides: http://www.greenchameleon.com/uploads/IKO_Keynote3_Moore_Competencies.pdf
Video: https://vimeo.com/132165318


Paul McDowall
 
Edited

Hi Matt,
This sounds like a very useful venture.  The extensive best-practice research study I conducted a number of years ago included Knowledge Organizing Systems (KOS) and here is an excerpt of the findings.  Hope it helps.
Paul


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi Paul,

Thanks for sending through. One noticeable thing about the IKO event was the lack of discussion around folksonomies. As a "thing", interest seems to have peaked in them around the end of the last decade. Interest in natural language (as opposed to controlled vocabularies) has not gone away (in fact it has increased massively) but is getting worked through in ways other than tagging.


Regards,

Matt

On Tuesday, 8 September 2015, 22:40, "paul_mcdowall@yahoo.ca [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




[Attachment(s) from paul_mcdowall@yahoo.ca [sikmleaders] included below]
Hi Matt,
This sounds like a very useful venture. The extensive best-practice research study I conducted a number of years ago included Knowledge Organizing Systems (KOS) and here is an excerpt of the findings. Hope it helps.
Paul


Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Paul

I echo Matt’s thanks and comment. It’s become clearer over time that “tagging” is actually an umbrella term for an act that fulfils a multiplicity of purposes (highlighting, mnemonics, signposting for self or others, to name but a few). Natural language processing and text analytics have somewhat superseded the interest in uncontrolled tagging simply because they can exploit structure and context of documents to abstract more usable finding or describing aids than tags often do. So while your findings are still relevant, what’s emerging is a more diverse portfolio of strategies, and not such a binary one, i.e. taxonomies vs tags.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  

On 9 Sep, 2015, at 5:39 am, Matt Moore innotecture@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Paul,

Thanks for sending through. One noticeable thing about the IKO event was the lack of discussion around folksonomies. As a "thing", interest seems to have peaked in them around the end of the last decade. Interest in natural language (as opposed to controlled vocabularies) has not gone away (in fact it has increased massively) but is getting worked through in ways other than tagging.

Regards,

Matt
On Tuesday, 8 September 2015, 22:40, "paul_mcdowall@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

[Attachment(s) from paul_mcdowall@... [sikmleaders] included below]
Hi Matt,
This sounds like a very useful venture. The extensive best-practice research study I conducted a number of years ago included Knowledge Organizing Systems (KOS) and here is an excerpt of the findings. Hope it helps.
Paul