What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? #vision #state-of-KM


Chris Collison <chris@...>
 


Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month, and they have asked me to do a “reflect and project” talk, looking back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals, conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars),  but I’d really value your help in my Marty McFly bit…  

So, in just a couple of sentences, what do you think KM will look like in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com
@chris_collison



 



Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Chris,

In 2031, you are presenting on the last 30 years of KM. Your audience will be predominantly Chinese and Indian executives. Some will be using automated translation software. Some will be from the prestigious aged care, health and clean tech sectors. Others will be from the lower status (and nationalised) financial services and mining sectors. Approximately one third of your audience will not be humans at all but automated note-taking devices personalised to record anything you say that is of interest to their owners.

Oh, and everyone will still be complaining about SharePoint.

Regards,

Matt


On Wednesday, 13 January 2016, 5:09, "Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]"


 

Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month, and they have asked me to do a “reflect and project” talk, looking back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals, conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars),  but I’d really value your help in my Marty McFly bit…  

So, in just a couple of sentences, what do you think KM will look like in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com
@chris_collison



 




Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science. By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@knowquestion.com.au
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@collison.com [sikmleaders] wrote:

Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
your help in my Marty McFly bit…

So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com
@chris_collison



**



Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Chris,

 

Good topic to explore and I am sure you will have fun with it.  I think that Matt pretty much nailed it.

The good thing about Matt’s response is it highlights that many things will not change…

Sectors change, which means where the income for KMers will adjust, but the decision-makers still need to go to experts to find out what they should know and be doing (that understand and socialise knowledge so they can make better decisions).  Some still believe (as they do now) that somehow machines can do the work of knowledge for them (assuming owning a library but not reading makes you more informed). They still don’t get that being part of the conversation with others increases the diversity of perspective and exchanges around these are what generates the new knowledge and therefore the innovation and enhanced performance.

 

On the other hand, if the KMers (by experience and practice) raise to become the decision makers we would have an entirely different world where strategic decisions are made in face to face conversations that focus on sustainable performance enhancement (or technologically supported modes that make virtual work effectively seamless and just like being there in person). In many cases the decisions are made as a result of the conversations that happen in the meeting itself, rather than through pre-determined political advocacy that seeks to manipulate the forum to fain group consensus.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 7:57 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Chris,

 

In 2031, you are presenting on the last 30 years of KM. Your audience will be predominantly Chinese and Indian executives. Some will be using automated translation software. Some will be from the prestigious aged care, health and clean tech sectors. Others will be from the lower status (and nationalised) financial services and mining sectors. Approximately one third of your audience will not be humans at all but automated note-taking devices personalised to record anything you say that is of interest to their owners.

 

Oh, and everyone will still be complaining about SharePoint.

 

Regards,

 

Matt

 

On Wednesday, 13 January 2016, 5:09, "Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hi SIKM community,

I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month, and they have asked me to do a “reflect and project” talk, looking back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

 

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals, conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars),  but I’d really value your help in my Marty McFly bit…  

 

So, in just a couple of sentences, what do you think KM will look like in 2031?

 

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this community with the presentation.

Many thanks in advance,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable ltd

@chris_collison

 

 

 

 

 

 


Arthur Shelley
 

Stephen (and Chris),

 

I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.

 

I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.

See here for more thoughts on this:

http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2013/09/12principlesknowledgeleadership/

http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2014/04/start-with-why/

 

Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>


Andrew Gent
 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
 
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>



Randhir Pushpa
 

Hi Chris,

Thank you for seeking our thoughts and ideas on this very interesting topic. I am sure we all will learn a lot from this.

15 years is a very long time considering the pace in which technology is changing. It is a real challenge to imagine where KM will take this world to. KM will have impact at country level, organization level and Individual level. Let me share my thoughts at Organization level:

Reactive to machine driven proactiveness: The current way of reactive Knowledge sharing and collaboration will move and it will be more driven by machines. Digital assistants will play a very important role. As programming will become a task like counting numbers, we will be able to create our own digital assistants, who will be able to seek and find relevant knowledge and do part of our work.

Death of SME in the current sense: The SME in the current sense will not be there as it will be easy to capture tacit knowledge and codify it. SME will have to build capabilities in seeking knowledge, sharing knowledge and building knowledge. 

Everyone will be a KMer: Knowledge managers in the current sense will not be there and we will have more of knowledge leveragers

Knowledge driven organization and others: What will differentiate a winner from loser will be in their ability to manage knowledge better, this is true even now, but technology will have a huge impact in future. Products will become more and more generic, and differentiation will come down. Advantage will be on thinking different, mixing different knowledges and ideas. The organization that will stand out is the one that can seek and work on knowledge faster.

Smart organizations driven by smart processes: Processes followed by organizations will be of self refining type. Self refining will be back by social networking and machine learning. Same is the case with organizations. I really doubt whether we will have the current Knowledge intensive organizations. They will be more of virtual organizations coming together for a business opportunity.

It will be nice if you plan for a live idea generation session in this group. By the way I plan to post what I shared in Linkedin. Hope you are fine with that.

Regards

Dr. Randhir Reghunath Pushpa

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 5:49 AM, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
 
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>




Arthur Shelley
 

Randhir, Chris and Andrew,

 

We are doing exactly what I believe to be the ultimate expression of KM in this interaction: sharing a diversity of thinking to inform each other and lead to better understanding and informed decisions). Thanks to Chris who asked an excellent question to engage the group. (This scenario in a nutshell IS KM which has not fundamentally changed, it has just become more widely applied and increased in the mind-spaces of more people).

 

Real KMers (IMHO) are people who naturally engage with each other to co-create better (and a wider diversity of) options, leveraging whatever is available at the time to suit the context. The tools are subservient to the thinking, feeling, behaviours and actions of the people co-creating and applying knowledge (generating new knowledge and learning as they interact).  Tools (including technology), processes and organisations will change, but the fundamental principles of knowledge leadership will not change much (and hasn’t over the past few decades either – just how we do it has).  Knowledge Leadership principles are like values – they have always been there and are being done by high performing leaders (it was not called KM, it was called being insightful and successful). Application of these principles have led to amazing scientific discoveries, enabled exploration of space, evolved cultures and societies (sometimes detrimentally when poorly applied) and even won wars (which may not have started in the first place if there was better knowledge leadership).  The principles evolve a little to adapt to more efficient and effective use of available tools and wider connections, but shape-shift (adapt) rather that significantly change. In reality (for those who get it right) knowledge Leadership is about the interactions between people who inclusively share to co-create value.  Impact is dependent with what proportion of the populations are actually doing this and how influential they are in the communities they interact with.

 

This community is a good example of this value creation and colearning. We just need to get more others doingthe same thing.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 11:28 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Hi Chris,

 

Thank you for seeking our thoughts and ideas on this very interesting topic. I am sure we all will learn a lot from this.

 

15 years is a very long time considering the pace in which technology is changing. It is a real challenge to imagine where KM will take this world to. KM will have impact at country level, organization level and Individual level. Let me share my thoughts at Organization level:

 

Reactive to machine driven proactiveness: The current way of reactive Knowledge sharing and collaboration will move and it will be more driven by machines. Digital assistants will play a very important role. As programming will become a task like counting numbers, we will be able to create our own digital assistants, who will be able to seek and find relevant knowledge and do part of our work.

 

Death of SME in the current sense: The SME in the current sense will not be there as it will be easy to capture tacit knowledge and codify it. SME will have to build capabilities in seeking knowledge, sharing knowledge and building knowledge. 

 

Everyone will be a KMer: Knowledge managers in the current sense will not be there and we will have more of knowledge leveragers

 

Knowledge driven organization and others: What will differentiate a winner from loser will be in their ability to manage knowledge better, this is true even now, but technology will have a huge impact in future. Products will become more and more generic, and differentiation will come down. Advantage will be on thinking different, mixing different knowledges and ideas. The organization that will stand out is the one that can seek and work on knowledge faster.

 

Smart organizations driven by smart processes: Processes followed by organizations will be of self refining type. Self refining will be back by social networking and machine learning. Same is the case with organizations. I really doubt whether we will have the current Knowledge intensive organizations. They will be more of virtual organizations coming together for a business opportunity.

 

It will be nice if you plan for a live idea generation session in this group. By the way I plan to post what I shared in Linkedin. Hope you are fine with that.

 

Regards

 

Dr. Randhir Reghunath Pushpa

 

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 5:49 AM, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

 

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

 

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)

 

On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 

Stephen (and Chris),

 

I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.

 

I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.

See here for more thoughts on this:

 

Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>

 

 


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Arthur,

We've sort of stated and counter-stated our opinions about KM leadership and theory vs practice without ever really engaging in a debate about it.

There was an interesting article by John Robb recently where he defines "culture" as an essential and key part of the orient phase of Boyd's OODA loop:

Orientation is different than the other steps in decision making.  It's a gut check.  A check of core values.  It is a synthesis of everything you've learned as it applies to the problem you face ... In contrast, culture is how human beings have learned to speed up orientation in a dependable way ... Culture can provide any individual, organization, or country with the outlook needed to successfully orient problems repeatedly and without hesitation.

When you say "leaders think, feel, and behave as a KMer", what does that mean? If you mean that they are working to implement a certain organisational culture, what does that culture look like? Is there a singular "KMer" culture or are there multiple valid models? Are we expecting leaders to understand the intricacies of organisational dynamics; or is it more about understanding the fundamentals and respecting that organisations have rules governing their operation that can't be flouted?

I still struggle with your assertion that "theories can rarely be implemented in practice". If changing the context is sufficient to make a theory inapplicable, you don't really have a robust theory.
Genetic algorithms evolve solutions to a problem without ever developing an overarching theory, but they are, by definition, context-dependent. Newton's First Law of Motion still works for a rolling vehicle despite the presence of friction seeming to contradict it. Quite to the contrary, it provides us with the framework to figure out how to make that vehicle roll further without a motive force: reduce friction.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 13/01/2016 9:58 AM, 'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders] wrote:
 

Stephen (and Chris),

 

I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.

 

I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.

See here for more thoughts on this:

http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2013/09/12principlesknowledgeleadership/

http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2014/04/start-with-why/

 

Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.

A

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>



Daan Boom
 

The good thing about future projections is that they never materialise in the trajectory timeline. To many dependencies on macro developments and small innovations. What we know however is that in 15 years we will have 8 billion people who all have the capability to produce and share knowledge. Dependencies on traditional fuels will be less or entirely gone which will drastically change the entire industry sector and a shift back from Asia to the US and Europa.  We know also that administrative jobs will be robotised. And you and me driving a car will be a rarity. So in all we will have more time to communicate. 

Likely is that traditional organisational structures and hierarchies will be transformed to flat and flexible. Employment as we know will likely fade away but some multinationals stay in power unless policies rule that multinationals have to much power and must be broken down.  Regardless, some companies will remain. In this greater context, I don’t expect knowledge management as function or discipline will exists as we know it.  The underlying KM tools and methodologies will most likely be embedded in organisational and staff thinking. There will be more attention for privacy and copyright issues for various reasons in order to protect intellectual property but Im sure it will be different organised as today. Staff, employees-not sure if we talk in 15 years about them as staff- will be different as the demographics will have a major impact how work will be done, where and by whom. More self employment perhaps as the tools we already have nowadays, will be further improved. I’ll see an expanded ‘starbuck’ concept emerging where people meet to work. Reading books and holding a newspaper will fade away in favour of video streaming. I don’t expect lessons learned to exist anymore as smart technologies will automatically generate ideas when you write or produce a visual. 

There is one caveat though which I see coming through which will influence how we live 15 years from now and that is social exclusion. Less people will work but this the fortunate to work will have to accept sharing of wealth more equally to avoid disruptive societal developments. According to the UN poverty will be gone in 2030 but it all matters how you define poverty. 

Success Chris.




On 13 Jan 2016, at 08:27, 'Randhir R.P' randhir.rp@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...


Hi Chris,

Thank you for seeking our thoughts and ideas on this very interesting topic. I am sure we all will learn a lot from this.

15 years is a very long time considering the pace in which technology is changing. It is a real challenge to imagine where KM will take this world to. KM will have impact at country level, organization level and Individual level. Let me share my thoughts at Organization level:

Reactive to machine driven proactiveness: The current way of reactive Knowledge sharing and collaboration will move and it will be more driven by machines. Digital assistants will play a very important role. As programming will become a task like counting numbers, we will be able to create our own digital assistants, who will be able to seek and find relevant knowledge and do part of our work.

Death of SME in the current sense: The SME in the current sense will not be there as it will be easy to capture tacit knowledge and codify it. SME will have to build capabilities in seeking knowledge, sharing knowledge and building knowledge. 

Everyone will be a KMer: Knowledge managers in the current sense will not be there and we will have more of knowledge leveragers

Knowledge driven organization and others: What will differentiate a winner from loser will be in their ability to manage knowledge better, this is true even now, but technology will have a huge impact in future. Products will become more and more generic, and differentiation will come down. Advantage will be on thinking different, mixing different knowledges and ideas. The organization that will stand out is the one that can seek and work on knowledge faster.

Smart organizations driven by smart processes: Processes followed by organizations will be of self refining type. Self refining will be back by social networking and machine learning. Same is the case with organizations. I really doubt whether we will have the current Knowledge intensive organizations. They will be more of virtual organizations coming together for a business opportunity.

It will be nice if you plan for a live idea generation session in this group. By the way I plan to post what I shared in Linkedin. Hope you are fine with that.

Regards

Dr. Randhir Reghunath Pushpa

On Wed, Jan 13, 2016 at 5:49 AM, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] 
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
  
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science. 
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual 
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading 
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as 
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders] 
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
> 







plessons@...
 

This video is not a couple of sentences. But it is a fascinating look backwards as to what might "become" in relation to KM etc. I am not necessarily conflating information management with knowledge management, but the content of this video reminds me of one of the many reasons why I find this space soooo interesting. 

ORDER AND DISORDER - THE STORY OF INFORMATION
The Story of Information - Professor Jim Al-Khalili investigates one of the most important concepts in the world today - information. He discovers how we harnessed the power of symbols, everything from the first alphabet to the electric telegraph through to the modern digital age. But on this journey he learns that information is not just about human communication, it is woven very profoundly into the fabric of reality. (Part 2 of 2) (From the UK) (Documentary) G CC 

It is available here via SBS on demand, so I am not sure if it is accessible from the US.

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/438796867701/order-and-disorder-the-story-of-information


Richard





----- Original Message -----
From:
sikmleaders@...

To:

Cc:

Sent:
Tue, 12 Jan 2016 18:09:34 +0000
Subject:
[sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?


 


Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month, and they have asked me to do a “reflect and project” talk, looking back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals, conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars),  but I’d really value your help in my Marty McFly bit…  

So, in just a couple of sentences, what do you think KM will look like in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com
@chris_collison



 



Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 
Edited

Prediction is hard, especially about the future

Some tangents to Chris's post.

1. A few years ago I was involved in a major futures project at a professional services firm. Enormous effort was expanded to identify 6 megatrends - the rise of non-Western economies, natural resource constraints, demographic change, technology, etc. When you compared our megatrends to those coming out of other consulting firms, think tanks, tech firms, governments - they were all pretty much the same. At a macro level, we roughly know what's likely to happen. There's surprisingly little disagreement about it. That doesn't mean we can predict the future in any sufficiently granular way to ensure personal or collective success (one look at commodity prices over the past 3 years settles that). Or that we can convert insight into action.

2. Read Philip Tetlock's Expert Political Judgment and Superforecasters to get a broader sense of the issues of prediction here. Every KM person should be aware of this research.

3. Scenario planning now has a bad rap. But at its best, it asks us to acknowledge multiple possible futures. The classic way to create 4 scenarios is to take 2 uncertain, uncorrelated but significant issues/drivers (e.g. Regulatory responses to tech innovation, rate of globalization) and cross them. What would be the 2 key uncertainties for KM?

4. My own sense is that KM has been in a holding pattern for the last 8 years (so the last 15 years is really only 7). 1993-2008 were the 15 years that mattered. I would suggest that we live in a post-KM world (I realize that claim may be somewhat controversial). We face either incrementalism (a slightly better collaboration platform) or complete automation (whack on some machine learning innit).

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504


Albert Simard
 

I think that Stephen, Arthur, and Andrew have identified parts of the future vision for KM.  I’d like to broaden their ideas. 

 

I see the future course of KM as moving towards integration.  Four organizational structures (social, business, technological, and knowledge) will be better integrated into a cohesive whole (or at least we’ll be moving in that direction).  Human nature won’t change much, it won’t matter what future business models look like, or what technology we’re using.  The key is that we’ll better understand how all four structures interact with each other.  The one-dimensional metaphor that I use for KM is finance.  Finance doesn’t run the organization, but everyone understands that the organization can’t run without it.  Hopefully, it will take less than a few hundred years to get there!  Drilling down a bit, I see social and technological approaches to KM coming closer together and the two schools developing sufficient common language that they can at least communicate with each other.  I also see a significant increase in our understanding of how KM interacts with social structures.  Enterprise architecture and systems analysis techniques will help with this.  Finally, I see KM evolving to recognize that different practices are needed to manage knowledge as it flows through different management regimes that are common to most, if not all organizations (responsible autonomy, negotiated agreement, organizational structure, and authoritative hierarchy).

 

That’s my story and I’m sticking with it until reality proves me wrong!  My apologies – I couldn’t get it all into an elevator pitch!

 

Al     


Howie Cohen
 

What will KM look like in 2031..

If we keep going the way we are going in this world, we will be teaching people how to make fire.    Really we are moving towards a connected / disconnected world where human interaction is decreasing but the frequency of communication is increasing.  The readiness of information through any device will be much more visible.   The real leap in KM so to speak from my perspective will be automation of social broadcasting.   Today we text, post, publish etc and we make decisions to do this.  With the new technologies readily available that "listen" to us our social network and knowledge will be broadcast automagically by intelligent platforms.   Instead of going to FB to post something,  Echo and other tech will simply know or make an algorithmic based assumption that it should post or publish something.   The result will be more content published with more find-ability.  Some studies show that Google covers somewhere between 1.4 and 1.8 percent of the total internet, I think this number will increase substantially.    Again, this indicates that knowledge, information, data will be easier to find but in 2031 if we haven't been consumed by the ocean, radiation, war or something else, wisdom will still be the key to the KM practice..  I hope to be there to see it.   

On Tue, Jan 12, 2016 at 5:29 PM, 'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Chris,

 

Good topic to explore and I am sure you will have fun with it.  I think that Matt pretty much nailed it.

The good thing about Matt’s response is it highlights that many things will not change…

Sectors change, which means where the income for KMers will adjust, but the decision-makers still need to go to experts to find out what they should know and be doing (that understand and socialise knowledge so they can make better decisions).  Some still believe (as they do now) that somehow machines can do the work of knowledge for them (assuming owning a library but not reading makes you more informed). They still don’t get that being part of the conversation with others increases the diversity of perspective and exchanges around these are what generates the new knowledge and therefore the innovation and enhanced performance.

 

On the other hand, if the KMers (by experience and practice) raise to become the decision makers we would have an entirely different world where strategic decisions are made in face to face conversations that focus on sustainable performance enhancement (or technologically supported modes that make virtual work effectively seamless and just like being there in person). In many cases the decisions are made as a result of the conversations that happen in the meeting itself, rather than through pre-determined political advocacy that seeks to manipulate the forum to fain group consensus.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 7:57 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

Chris,

 

In 2031, you are presenting on the last 30 years of KM. Your audience will be predominantly Chinese and Indian executives. Some will be using automated translation software. Some will be from the prestigious aged care, health and clean tech sectors. Others will be from the lower status (and nationalised) financial services and mining sectors. Approximately one third of your audience will not be humans at all but automated note-taking devices personalised to record anything you say that is of interest to their owners.

 

Oh, and everyone will still be complaining about SharePoint.

 

Regards,

 

Matt

 

On Wednesday, 13 January 2016, 5:09, "Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

 

 

Hi SIKM community,

I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month, and they have asked me to do a “reflect and project” talk, looking back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

 

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals, conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars),  but I’d really value your help in my Marty McFly bit…  

 

So, in just a couple of sentences, what do you think KM will look like in 2031?

 

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this community with the presentation.

Many thanks in advance,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable ltd

@chris_collison

 

 

 

 

 

 



Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

By "a couple of sentences" I'm going to presume you meant something on the order of two or three. With that in mind, and the expansive scope of the question I see no way of providing a response that won't resemble haiku. That said, here's my take on it (oh, and I am going to include a view of the past 15 years for context - so that gives me another 2-3 sentences :-).

KM 2001-2015

We started with the wonders of the web and the ability to easily publish and share things. Suddenly there was too much stuff so we focused on taxonomies and capturing more stuff that wasn't normally captured. Somewhere along the way we realized that maybe we should also focus on re-use, and that really collaboration was at least as important as stuff was. Innovation and productivity were the ultimate goals for the effort expended.

KM 2016-2031

Innovation and productivity continue to be the goals - except that by 2031 productivity will largely be solved via robotic process automation and AI. Innovation will continue to be dominated by lowly wetware, a fact that the "robots", if they had emotions, would likely resent. Despite the dystopian ramifications of it, KMers will nevertheless continue to seek the algorithms and secrets of innovation so the robots will one day surpass wetware as the engine of innovation. http://1.usa.gov/1Kd7VPt.

=======================
Tom Short
Tom Short Consulting
San Francisco
=======================


Chris Collison <chris@...>
 

Great responses so far everyone – thank you -  keep ‘em coming!

Still smiling at Matts SharePoint reference…  :)  


From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Tom Short tman9999@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 at 15:40
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

By "a couple of sentences" I'm going to presume you meant something on the order of two or three. With that in mind, and the expansive scope of the question I see no way of providing a response that won't resemble haiku. That said, here's my take on it (oh, and I am going to include a view of the past 15 years for context - so that gives me another 2-3 sentences :-).

KM 2001-2015

We started with the wonders of the web and the ability to easily publish and share things. Suddenly there was too much stuff so we focused on taxonomies and capturing more stuff that wasn't normally captured. Somewhere along the way we realized that maybe we should also focus on re-use, and that really collaboration was at least as important as stuff was. Innovation and productivity were the ultimate goals for the effort expended.

KM 2016-2031

Innovation and productivity continue to be the goals - except that by 2031 productivity will largely be solved via robotic process automation and AI. Innovation will continue to be dominated by lowly wetware, a fact that the "robots", if they had emotions, would likely resent. Despite the dystopian ramifications of it, KMers will nevertheless continue to seek the algorithms and secrets of innovation so the robots will one day surpass wetware as the engine of innovation. http://1.usa.gov/1Kd7VPt.

=======================
Tom Short
Tom Short Consulting
San Francisco
=======================


Arthur Shelley
 

Thanks Matt

Your perspective is very much aligned with how I actually operate my own life (everything is integrated with everything and fully interdependent). I believe this is the most mutually value creating, rewarding, effective and efficient (deliberately in that order) approach and requires complete embedding of knowledge principles.

Our (the knowledge community) biggest challenge is to bring others to this mindset.

Arthur Shelley
Founder, Intelligent Answers
@Metaphorage
+61 413 047 408

On 14 Jan 2016, at 12:45 AM, Albert Simard albert.simard@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I think that Stephen, Arthur, and Andrew have identified parts of the future vision for KM.  I’d like to broaden their ideas. 

 

I see the future course of KM as moving towards integration.  Four organizational structures (social, business, technological, and knowledge) will be better integrated into a cohesive whole (or at least we’ll be moving in that direction).  Human nature won’t change much, it won’t matter what future business models look like, or what technology we’re using.  The key is that we’ll better understand how all four structures interact with each other.  The one-dimensional metaphor that I use for KM is finance.  Finance doesn’t run the organization, but everyone understands that the organization can’t run without it.  Hopefully, it will take less than a few hundred years to get there!  Drilling down a bit, I see social and technological approaches to KM coming closer together and the two schools developing sufficient common language that they can at least communicate with each other.  I also see a significant increase in our understanding of how KM interacts with social structures.  Enterprise architecture and systems analysis techniques will help with this.  Finally, I see KM evolving to recognize that different practices are needed to manage knowledge as it flows through different management regimes that are common to most, if not all organizations (responsible autonomy, negotiated agreement, organizational structure, and authoritative hierarchy).

 

That’s my story and I’m sticking with it until reality proves me wrong!  My apologies – I couldn’t get it all into an elevator pitch!

 

Al     


Nancy Dixon
 


 

By 2031 we will have made the move (or be well on our way):

·        from hierarchical organizations to networked organizations where knowledge flows between networked members and between networks (McChrystal in Team of Teams says every team member knows someone on another team)

·         from command and control to more democratic and self governing forms – organization members who jointly created the organization’s vision and goals; which then allows team and programs to make decisions locally, but also means organizational members are interested in making sure those decisions benefit the whole organization

·      from productivity to innovation – innovation requires knowledge exchange between different parts of the organization

·      from employees to free lancers who move from project to project carrying with them the knowledge they have learned and spreading it as they move 

·      from co-located workers to virtual workers, who may live nearby but don’t  need to commute to work daily, and others who are in different cities and countries – virtual access to team members will be on-going rather than sporadic

·      from knowledge domains to ever smaller knowledge sub-specialties   –so the only way to coordinate work on a project is to have those sub-specialties connected virtually and periodically bringing them together face-to-face to learn with and from each other

Nancy

On Jan 13, 2016, at 10:48 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Great responses so far everyone – thank you -  keep ‘em coming!
Still smiling at Matts SharePoint reference…  :)  

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Tom Short tman9999@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 at 15:40
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

By "a couple of sentences" I'm going to presume you meant something on the order of two or three. With that in mind, and the expansive scope of the question I see no way of providing a response that won't resemble haiku. That said, here's my take on it (oh, and I am going to include a view of the past 15 years for context - so that gives me another 2-3 sentences :-).

KM 2001-2015

We started with the wonders of the web and the ability to easily publish and share things. Suddenly there was too much stuff so we focused on taxonomies and capturing more stuff that wasn't normally captured. Somewhere along the way we realized that maybe we should also focus on re-use, and that really collaboration was at least as important as stuff was. Innovation and productivity were the ultimate goals for the effort expended.

KM 2016-2031

Innovation and productivity continue to be the goals - except that by 2031 productivity will largely be solved via robotic process automation and AI. Innovation will continue to be dominated by lowly wetware, a fact that the "robots", if they had emotions, would likely resent. Despite the dystopian ramifications of it, KMers will nevertheless continue to seek the algorithms and secrets of innovation so the robots will one day surpass wetware as the engine of innovation. http://1.usa.gov/1Kd7VPt.

=======================
Tom Short
Tom Short Consulting
San Francisco
=======================



 

All good projections.  I also believe that the actual movement and evolution of KM will depend to some extent on whether it’s in the public sector or the private sector; the mission of the organization and their geography and demographics; and whether they are in services, academia, or research, manufacturing or production.

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: January 14, 2016 14:30
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

 

 

 

By 2031 we will have made the move (or be well on our way):

·                       from hierarchical organizations to networked organizations where knowledge flows between networked members and between networks (McChrystal in Team of Teams says every team member knows someone on another team)

·                     from command and control to more democratic and self governing forms – organization members who jointly created the organization’s vision and goals; which then allows team and programs to make decisions locally, but also means organizational members are interested in making sure those decisions benefit the whole organization

·                     from productivity to innovation – innovation requires knowledge exchange between different parts of the organization

·                     from employees to free lancers who move from project to project carrying with them the knowledge they have learned and spreading it as they move 

·                     from co-located workers to virtual workers, who may live nearby but don’t  need to commute to work daily, and others who are in different cities and countries – virtual access to team members will be on-going rather than sporadic

·                     from knowledge domains to ever smaller knowledge sub-specialties   –so the only way to coordinate work on a project is to have those sub-specialties connected virtually and periodically bringing them together face-to-face to learn with and from each other

Nancy

 

On Jan 13, 2016, at 10:48 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:



 

 

Great responses so far everyone – thank you -  keep ‘em coming!

Still smiling at Matt’s SharePoint reference…  :)  

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Tom Short tman9999@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 at 15:40
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

By "a couple of sentences" I'm going to presume you meant something on the order of two or three. With that in mind, and the expansive scope of the question I see no way of providing a response that won't resemble haiku. That said, here's my take on it (oh, and I am going to include a view of the past 15 years for context - so that gives me another 2-3 sentences :-).

 

KM 2001-2015

 

We started with the wonders of the web and the ability to easily publish and share things. Suddenly there was too much stuff so we focused on taxonomies and capturing more stuff that wasn't normally captured. Somewhere along the way we realized that maybe we should also focus on re-use, and that really collaboration was at least as important as stuff was. Innovation and productivity were the ultimate goals for the effort expended.

 

KM 2016-2031

 

Innovation and productivity continue to be the goals - except that by 2031 productivity will largely be solved via robotic process automation and AI. Innovation will continue to be dominated by lowly wetware, a fact that the "robots", if they had emotions, would likely resent. Despite the dystopian ramifications of it, KMers will nevertheless continue to seek the algorithms and secrets of innovation so the robots will one day surpass wetware as the engine of innovation. http://1.usa.gov/1Kd7VPt.

=======================
Tom Short

Tom Short Consulting

San Francisco

=======================

 

 


Andy Ruth
 

Holacracy by Brian J. Robertson is another good book that describes many of the aspects below, and Zappos is a company that operates using the principles in the book.

-andy

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2016 11:30 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 




 

By 2031 we will have made the move (or be well on our way):

·        from hierarchical organizations to networked organizations where knowledge flows between networked members and between networks (McChrystal in Team of Teams says every team member knows someone on another team)

·                         from command and control to more democratic and self governing forms – organization members who jointly created the organization’s vision and goals; which then allows team and programs to make decisions locally, but also means organizational members are interested in making sure those decisions benefit the whole organization

·      from productivity to innovation – innovation requires knowledge exchange between different parts of the organization

·      from employees to free lancers who move from project to project carrying with them the knowledge they have learned and spreading it as they move 

·      from co-located workers to virtual workers, who may live nearby but don’t  need to commute to work daily, and others who are in different cities and countries – virtual access to team members will be on-going rather than sporadic

·      from knowledge domains to ever smaller knowledge sub-specialties   –so the only way to coordinate work on a project is to have those sub-specialties connected virtually and periodically bringing them together face-to-face to learn with and from each other

Nancy

 

On Jan 13, 2016, at 10:48 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:



 

 

Great responses so far everyone – thank you -  keep ‘em coming!

Still smiling at Matt’s SharePoint reference…  :)  

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Tom Short tman9999@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 at 15:40
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?

 

By "a couple of sentences" I'm going to presume you meant something on the order of two or three. With that in mind, and the expansive scope of the question I see no way of providing a response that won't resemble haiku. That said, here's my take on it (oh, and I am going to include a view of the past 15 years for context - so that gives me another 2-3 sentences :-).

 

KM 2001-2015

 

We started with the wonders of the web and the ability to easily publish and share things. Suddenly there was too much stuff so we focused on taxonomies and capturing more stuff that wasn't normally captured. Somewhere along the way we realized that maybe we should also focus on re-use, and that really collaboration was at least as important as stuff was. Innovation and productivity were the ultimate goals for the effort expended.

 

KM 2016-2031

 

Innovation and productivity continue to be the goals - except that by 2031 productivity will largely be solved via robotic process automation and AI. Innovation will continue to be dominated by lowly wetware, a fact that the "robots", if they had emotions, would likely resent. Despite the dystopian ramifications of it, KMers will nevertheless continue to seek the algorithms and secrets of innovation so the robots will one day surpass wetware as the engine of innovation. http://1.usa.gov/1Kd7VPt.

=======================
Tom Short

Tom Short Consulting

San Francisco

=======================