Topics

What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]


Patrick Lambe
 

Interesting typo (autocorrect): I meant to say “skillsets” but my computer prefers “skillets”. Who am I to argue?

P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  

On 22 Jan, 2016, at 11:23 am, Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I’m with Andrew on this. We are of course fully invested in what we see as our near futures, and the predictions we make reflect as much wishful thinking as observation. I speak as a sinner myself. Most of us are NOT very good at predicting things as far out as 15 years.


With that caveat, here’s what I think has been happening over the past 15 years. The practice of KM is essentially a work of design, trying to figure out (and sensibly frame) needs and then cobbling together a mix of technologies and methods into solutions for those needs. The early years were very much an affair of amateur pioneers, brave people from a wide range of backgrounds, experimenting like crazy and fuelled by wit, imagination and often hype. Of these experiments, a few successes were elevated and broadcast to enthuse the masses, while the large number of failures were studiously not talked about. This seriously stunted our collective ability to learn.

Forums like this, increasing longevity in KM roles, and greater willingness to discuss failures as well as successes  has slowly improved our collective ability to learn. Knowledge about our practice is stabilising though it’s hardly mature.

What I think I see now is increasing specialisation of KM roles, around skillets. There are roles that focus on facilitation, and there are roles that focus on business process support, and roles that focus on learning, and roles that focus on knowledge product design, and on knowledge organisation, and on technology design. These represent distinct specialist skillets, but they are interesting because they are not the same inherited skillets that the early knowledge managers brought to their roles. It’s early days, but if this continues, I think KM will be a label for a cluster of sub disciplines, with few generalists and many specialists.

Looking to the next 3-5 years, the pressures on organisations to operate effectively on scale and at speed under increasing stress from the economic, social and political environment are going to accelerate - these are the stresses that gave rise to KM in the first place. So the need for KM isn’t going to go away. The question is whether the profession gets better at what it does, and if so, how quickly. This is partly a function of how well the sub disciplines work together to create orchestrated solutions for different organisational needs. Do we fragment or do we coalesce?

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  

On 13 Jan, 2016, at 8:19 am, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
 
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>







Chris Collison <chris@...>
 

Thanks Patrick  - very nicely put.  I completely agree with you. (and I quite like the skillets idea too!).  

For me, the oft-trumpeted death throes of KM have been labour pains all along, and we need to focus on the well-being of the next generations, which –just like my daughters, may or may not chose to keep the family name at some point in the future.  
But they will always have my DNA.
 


From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 03:26
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]

Interesting typo (autocorrect): I meant to say “skillsets” but my computer prefers “skillets”. Who am I to argue?

P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  


On 22 Jan, 2016, at 11:23 am, Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I’m with Andrew on this. We are of course fully invested in what we see as our near futures, and the predictions we make reflect as much wishful thinking as observation. I speak as a sinner myself. Most of us are NOT very good at predicting things as far out as 15 years.


With that caveat, here’s what I think has been happening over the past 15 years. The practice of KM is essentially a work of design, trying to figure out (and sensibly frame) needs and then cobbling together a mix of technologies and methods into solutions for those needs. The early years were very much an affair of amateur pioneers, brave people from a wide range of backgrounds, experimenting like crazy and fuelled by wit, imagination and often hype. Of these experiments, a few successes were elevated and broadcast to enthuse the masses, while the large number of failures were studiously not talked about. This seriously stunted our collective ability to learn.

Forums like this, increasing longevity in KM roles, and greater willingness to discuss failures as well as successes  has slowly improved our collective ability to learn. Knowledge about our practice is stabilising though it’s hardly mature.

What I think I see now is increasing specialisation of KM roles, around skillets. There are roles that focus on facilitation, and there are roles that focus on business process support, and roles that focus on learning, and roles that focus on knowledge product design, and on knowledge organisation, and on technology design. These represent distinct specialist skillets, but they are interesting because they are not the same inherited skillets that the early knowledge managers brought to their roles. It’s early days, but if this continues, I think KM will be a label for a cluster of sub disciplines, with few generalists and many specialists.

Looking to the next 3-5 years, the pressures on organisations to operate effectively on scale and at speed under increasing stress from the economic, social and political environment are going to accelerate - these are the stresses that gave rise to KM in the first place. So the need for KM isn’t going to go away. The question is whether the profession gets better at what it does, and if so, how quickly. This is partly a function of how well the sub disciplines work together to create orchestrated solutions for different organisational needs. Do we fragment or do we coalesce?

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  

On 13 Jan, 2016, at 8:19 am, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
 
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>







 

Re KM is Dead…thought you might enjoy this cartoon adaptation if you haven’t already.

[meme_KM]
source: post from Jose Carlos Tenorio Favero<http://www.twitter.com/josecarloskm>;




From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: January 22, 2016 04:26
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]


[Attachment(s) from Chris Collison included below]
Thanks Patrick - very nicely put. I completely agree with you. (and I quite like the skillets idea too!).

For me, the oft-trumpeted death throes of KM have been labour pains all along, and we need to focus on the well-being of the next generations, which –just like my daughters, may or may not chose to keep the family name at some point in the future.
But they will always have my DNA.


From: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> on behalf of "Patrick Lambe plambe@greenchameleon.com<mailto:plambe@greenchameleon.com> [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 03:26
To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]

Interesting typo (autocorrect): I meant to say “skillsets” but my computer prefers “skillets”. Who am I to argue?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383
[cid:01DE4A23-9AA9-4385-AB56-E1B0828A3ED3@home]

website: www.straitsknowledge.com<http://www.straitsknowledge.com>;
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com<http://www.greenchameleon.com>;
book: www.organisingknowledge.com<http://www.organisingknowledge.com>;

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com

On 22 Jan, 2016, at 11:23 am, Patrick Lambe plambe@greenchameleon.com<mailto:plambe@greenchameleon.com> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:




I’m with Andrew on this. We are of course fully invested in what we see as our near futures, and the predictions we make reflect as much wishful thinking as observation. I speak as a sinner myself. Most of us are NOT very good at predicting things as far out as 15 years.

With that caveat, here’s what I think has been happening over the past 15 years. The practice of KM is essentially a work of design, trying to figure out (and sensibly frame) needs and then cobbling together a mix of technologies and methods into solutions for those needs. The early years were very much an affair of amateur pioneers, brave people from a wide range of backgrounds, experimenting like crazy and fuelled by wit, imagination and often hype. Of these experiments, a few successes were elevated and broadcast to enthuse the masses, while the large number of failures were studiously not talked about. This seriously stunted our collective ability to learn.

Forums like this, increasing longevity in KM roles, and greater willingness to discuss failures as well as successes has slowly improved our collective ability to learn. Knowledge about our practice is stabilising though it’s hardly mature.

What I think I see now is increasing specialisation of KM roles, around skillets. There are roles that focus on facilitation, and there are roles that focus on business process support, and roles that focus on learning, and roles that focus on knowledge product design, and on knowledge organisation, and on technology design. These represent distinct specialist skillets, but they are interesting because they are not the same inherited skillets that the early knowledge managers brought to their roles. It’s early days, but if this continues, I think KM will be a label for a cluster of sub disciplines, with few generalists and many specialists.

Looking to the next 3-5 years, the pressures on organisations to operate effectively on scale and at speed under increasing stress from the economic, social and political environment are going to accelerate - these are the stresses that gave rise to KM in the first place. So the need for KM isn’t going to go away. The question is whether the profession gets better at what it does, and if so, how quickly. This is partly a function of how well the sub disciplines work together to create orchestrated solutions for different organisational needs. Do we fragment or do we coalesce?

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383

<SKlogo10anniv150.jpg>

website: www.straitsknowledge.com<http://www.straitsknowledge.com/>;
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com<http://www.greenchameleon.com/>;
book: www.organisingknowledge.com<http://www.organisingknowledge.com/>;

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com<;http://www.aithinsoftware.com/>;

On 13 Jan, 2016, at 8:19 am, Andrew Gent ajgent@yahoo.com<mailto:ajgent@yahoo.com> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:




I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures.

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)

On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@organizationalzoo.com<mailto:arthur@organizationalzoo.com> [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


Stephen (and Chris),

I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.

I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2013/09/12principlesknowledgeleadership/
http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2014/04/start-with-why/

Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A

Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley Twitter: @Metaphorage
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com<http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>;
Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog<http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog>;

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?


Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@knowquestion.com.au<mailto:sb@knowquestion.com.au>
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@collison.com<mailto:chris@collison.com> [sikmleaders]
wrote:

Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
your help in my Marty McFly bit…

So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com<http://www.chriscollison.com/>;
@chris_collison



**



Chris Collison <chris@...>
 

Hi All,
Back in January I asked you for your thoughts on the next 15 years in KM for a presentation I was going at Henley Business Schools KM Forum – thank you for those.  The presentation went down well, and there are rumours that there are pictures of me in the twitter sphere presenting in  a Doc Emmett Brian ‘back to the future’ wig which I couldn’t possibly comment on!

The slides are here on SlideShare:    Some of the content is a bit parochial to the Henley KM audience, and of course there is the normal challenge of the 'leakage of meaning’ when condensing an in-person presentation to a set of slides – we say more than we ever write down etc.

The key messages come at the end on slide 28:

"Some things are “evergreen”.  People will always need to talk, learn, reflect, collaborate and interact. Expertise will continue be prized, but the bar will be raised on machine learning. Employment boundaries will change and become more permeable; communities and networks will become more flexible.Technology will change significantly, offering huge opportunities to a smaller number of people who understand how to integrate behaviour, understanding and technology.

So for KM?  I don’t think we’ll be using the label in 2031 – but well recognise today’s KM DNA in a series of sub-disciplines which it has become unbundled into.  Knowledge, Learning and Change will still be fundamental to success."


I finished off with a comment that people are confusing KM’s death throes for its labour pains – and that we need to be ready to be good parents and grandparents to whatever KM has becomes over the next 15 years.

Thanks again for your input on this.  Here’s to the next 15 years, and to our children!
Chris

From: Chris Collison
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 09:26
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]

Thanks Patrick  - very nicely put.  I completely agree with you. (and I quite like the skillets idea too!).  

For me, the oft-trumpeted death throes of KM have been labour pains all along, and we need to focus on the well-being of the next generations, which –just like my daughters, may or may not chose to keep the family name at some point in the future.  
But they will always have my DNA.
 


From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 03:26
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]

Interesting typo (autocorrect): I meant to say “skillsets” but my computer prefers “skillets”. Who am I to argue?

P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  


On 22 Jan, 2016, at 11:23 am, Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I’m with Andrew on this. We are of course fully invested in what we see as our near futures, and the predictions we make reflect as much wishful thinking as observation. I speak as a sinner myself. Most of us are NOT very good at predicting things as far out as 15 years.


With that caveat, here’s what I think has been happening over the past 15 years. The practice of KM is essentially a work of design, trying to figure out (and sensibly frame) needs and then cobbling together a mix of technologies and methods into solutions for those needs. The early years were very much an affair of amateur pioneers, brave people from a wide range of backgrounds, experimenting like crazy and fuelled by wit, imagination and often hype. Of these experiments, a few successes were elevated and broadcast to enthuse the masses, while the large number of failures were studiously not talked about. This seriously stunted our collective ability to learn.

Forums like this, increasing longevity in KM roles, and greater willingness to discuss failures as well as successes  has slowly improved our collective ability to learn. Knowledge about our practice is stabilising though it’s hardly mature.

What I think I see now is increasing specialisation of KM roles, around skillets. There are roles that focus on facilitation, and there are roles that focus on business process support, and roles that focus on learning, and roles that focus on knowledge product design, and on knowledge organisation, and on technology design. These represent distinct specialist skillets, but they are interesting because they are not the same inherited skillets that the early knowledge managers brought to their roles. It’s early days, but if this continues, I think KM will be a label for a cluster of sub disciplines, with few generalists and many specialists.

Looking to the next 3-5 years, the pressures on organisations to operate effectively on scale and at speed under increasing stress from the economic, social and political environment are going to accelerate - these are the stresses that gave rise to KM in the first place. So the need for KM isn’t going to go away. The question is whether the profession gets better at what it does, and if so, how quickly. This is partly a function of how well the sub disciplines work together to create orchestrated solutions for different organisational needs. Do we fragment or do we coalesce?

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com  

On 13 Jan, 2016, at 8:19 am, Andrew Gent ajgent@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).

I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures. 

Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...

--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)


On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


 
Stephen (and Chris),
 
I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.
 
I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
 
Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A
 
Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage
Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com
 
From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?
 
 
Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
>
> Hi SIKM community,
> I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
> and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
> back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.
>
> Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
> conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
> your help in my Marty McFly bit…
>
> So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
> in 2031?
>
> I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
> community with the presentation.
> Many thanks in advance,
> Chris
>
> Knowledgeable ltd
> www.chriscollison.com
> @chris_collison
>
>
>
> **
>
>
>







Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Chris,


Many thanks for sharing back and I'm glad that it went well.

Could you say a bit more about the audience response?
Were there many people there from the 2001 conference?
I assume that because they were at the conference, they were still optimistic about the future of KM?
How did your presentation resonate (or not) with the other sessions?

Regards,

Matt

On Monday, 21 March 2016, 21:11, "Chris Collison chris@collison.com [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




[Attachment(s) from Chris Collison included below]
Hi All,
Back in January I asked you for your thoughts on the next 15 years in KM for a presentation I was going at Henley Business Schools KM Forum – thank you for those. The presentation went down well, and there are rumours that there are pictures of me in the twitter sphere presenting in a Doc Emmett Brian ‘back to the future’ wig which I couldn’t possibly comment on!

The slides are here on SlideShare: http://bit.ly/1RuW3uv Some of the content is a bit parochial to the Henley KM audience, and of course there is the normal challenge of the 'leakage of meaning’ when condensing an in-person presentation to a set of slides – we say more than we ever write down etc.

The key messages come at the end on slide 28:
"Some things are “evergreen”. People will always needto talk, learn, reflect,
collaborate and interact. Expertise will continue be prized, but the bar will
be raised on machine learning. Employment boundaries will change and become
more permeable; communities and networks will become more flexible.Technology
will change significantly, offering huge opportunities to a smaller number of
people who understand how to integrate behaviour, understanding and technology.
So
for KM? I don’t think we’ll be using the
label in 2031 – but well recognisetoday’s KM DNA in a series of
sub-disciplines which it has become unbundled into. Knowledge, Learning and Change will still be
fundamental to success."

I finished off with a comment that people are confusing KM’s death throes for its labour pains – and that we need to be ready to be good parents and grandparents to whatever KM has becomes over the next 15 years.

Thanks again for your input on this. Here’s to the next 15 years, and to our children!
Chris

From: Chris Collison
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 09:26
To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]


Thanks Patrick - very nicely put. I completely agree with you. (and I quite like the skillets idea too!).

For me, the oft-trumpeted death throes of KM have been labour pains all along, and we need to focus on the well-being of the next generations, which –just like my daughters, may or may not chose to keep the family name at some point in the future.
But they will always have my DNA.

From: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of "Patrick Lambe plambe@greenchameleon.com [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, 22 January 2016 at 03:26
To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...? [1 Attachment]


Interesting typo (autocorrect): I meant to say “skillsets” but my computer prefers “skillets”. Who am I to argue?

P


Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383



website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com

On 22 Jan, 2016, at 11:23 am, Patrick Lambe plambe@greenchameleon.com [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


I’m with Andrew on this. We are of course fully invested in what we see as our near futures, and the predictions we make reflect as much wishful thinking as observation. I speak as a sinner myself. Most of us are NOT very good at predicting things as far out as 15 years.


With that caveat, here’s what I think has been happening over the past 15 years. The practice of KM is essentially a work of design, trying to figure out (and sensibly frame) needs and then cobbling together a mix of technologies and methods into solutions for those needs. The early years were very much an affair of amateur pioneers, brave people from a wide range of backgrounds, experimenting like crazy and fuelled by wit, imagination and often hype. Of these experiments, a few successes were elevated and broadcast to enthuse the masses, while the large number of failures were studiously not talked about. This seriously stunted our collective ability to learn.


Forums like this, increasing longevity in KM roles, and greater willingness to discuss failures as well as successes has slowly improved our collective ability to learn. Knowledge about our practice is stabilising though it’s hardly mature.


What I think I see now is increasing specialisation of KM roles, around skillets. There are roles that focus on facilitation, and there are roles that focus on business process support, and roles that focus on learning, and roles that focus on knowledge product design, and on knowledge organisation, and on technology design. These represent distinct specialist skillets, but they are interesting because they are not the same inherited skillets that the early knowledge managers brought to their roles. It’s early days, but if this continues, I think KM will be a label for a cluster of sub disciplines, with few generalists and many specialists.


Looking to the next 3-5 years, the pressures on organisations to operate effectively on scale and at speed under increasing stress from the economic, social and political environment are going to accelerate - these are the stresses that gave rise to KM in the first place. So the need for KM isn’t going to go away. The question is whether the profession gets better at what it does, and if so, how quickly. This is partly a function of how well the sub disciplines work together to create orchestrated solutions for different organisational needs. Do we fragment or do we coalesce?


Patrick


Patrick Lambe
Partner
Tel: +65 62210383

<SKlogo10anniv150.jpg>

website: www.straitsknowledge.com
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com
book: www.organisingknowledge.com

Knowledge mapping made easy http://www.aithinsoftware.com

On 13 Jan, 2016, at 8:19 am, Andrew Gent ajgent@yahoo.com [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




I really hate to do this, but I'm going to have to disagree with everybody. If you want to know where KM is in 15 years you'll need to know where business is in 15 years and I really don't think any of us have the wherewithal to know that. 15 years ago did you think "agile" would rule and "wiki" (which was brand new) would be a key player in KM? Facebook didn't exist and SharePoint was just launched (in 2001).


I'd say no. And I have as little knowledge about what whims and fancies will drive business 15 years hence. I think the real key -- as it is today -- is understanding how the people who do the work view their contribution and how they communicate with their peers. And, more importantly, understanding how that ongoing conversation continues across a constantly shifting ebb and flow of tools, apps, devices, and social structures.


Can I tell you where KM will be in 15 years? No. Can I tell you how to ensure it doesn't survive? Build your plans on current infrastructure and business practices (e.g. SharePoint, Lotus Notes, etc)...


--Andrew Gent (in a contradictory mood)



On Tuesday, January 12, 2016 5:58 PM, "'Arthur' arthur@organizationalzoo.com [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




Stephen (and Chris),

I think your description is probably accurate, but like Matt’s (also realistic) response makes the assumption that the KMer is a support function to the leadership.

I believe we can create something better if we invest time and effort to develop a society in which the leader thinking, feeling and behaving as a KMer. That is knowledge principles are embedded into the way leaders make decisions and this also informs the processes through which sustainable (all) actions are implemented.
See here for more thoughts on this:
http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2013/09/12principlesknowledgeleadership/
http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog/2014/04/start-with-why/

Just as a related aside, whilst I agree that more robust theories and models are useful to have for educating people, they are rarely implemented in practice because of the unpredictability of contexts. We will get to Knowledge Leadership through actions (informed by theories), that provide decision-makers with more effective practices that visibly enhance performance.
A

Regards
Arthur Shelley
Intelligent Answers
Founder:The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network
Author:The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader
New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion
Mb.+61 413 047 408 Skype: Arthur.Shelley Twitter: @Metaphorage
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168
Free behavioural profiles:www.organizationalzoo.com
Blog:www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

From:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, 13 January 2016 8:00 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] What will KM look like in 2031 - in a couple of sentences...?


Hi Chris,

In 15 years, KM will finally be transitioning from alchemy to a science.
By developing robust theories for forecasting and managing individual
and organisational responses to KM interventions, the thought of leading
any reasonably-sized organisation without a KM expert will seem as
unnecessarily risky as building a bridge without hiring an engineer.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@knowquestion.com.au
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 13/01/2016 5:09 AM, Chris Collison chris@collison.com [sikmleaders]
wrote:

Hi SIKM community,
I’m presenting at the Henley KM Forum’s annual conference next month,
and they have asked me to do a /“reflect and project”/ talk, looking
back 15 years and forward 15 years to the future shape of KM.

Looking back is fairly straightforward (I’ve got the journals,
conference flyers, bookshelves and battle scars), but I’d really value
your help in my Marty McFly bit…

So, /in just a couple of sentences/, what do you think KM will look like
in 2031?

I’ll consolidate and cluster the responses and share them back into this
community with the presentation.
Many thanks in advance,
Chris

Knowledgeable ltd
www.chriscollison.com
@chris_collison



**