Knowledge Manager Job Responsibilities #roles


Darrin Quesenberry
 

Hello,

I have been in the field of training and development for 8 years now. I discovered knowledge management in graduate school and ever since I have been studying best practices and talking with other experts in the field. The company I work for is very behind when it comes to KM. I introduced the concept to senior executives several months ago. They have bought into the importance of KM and I am currently organizing the effort to create an organization wide program. I realize that KM isn't a program, it is a culture. For me to change the culture, I first have to show what practices should look like. 


I wasn't hired to do this role, but it has become my dream role to have. Since I am the owner of KM at my company, I would like my title to reflect this. I want to propose to my company to change my title etc. I do not know what title to ask for however. I know that titles include Chief Learning Officer, Chief Knowledge Officer, and Knowledge Manager. Just curious if one is more typical to have? As far as looking for other jobs in the future possible, is there a title that would be better to have on my resume?  Also, is there a list of typical responsibilities of a CKO, CLO, Knowledge Manager that someone could point me to? 


Thanks,

Darrin 


 

Hi Darrin

 

Here is a link to an article I wrote about CKOs while I was a CKO for a mid-cap consulting company in Washington DC in 2007. 

 

This is a link to a Linked In article on Knowledge Managers.  Hope these can be of some value to you.

 

Call if you have questions or I can help in any way.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: March 13, 2016 21:02
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Manager Job Responsibilities

 

 

Hello,

I have been in the field of training and development for 8 years now. I discovered knowledge management in graduate school and ever since I have been studying best practices and talking with other experts in the field. The company I work for is very behind when it comes to KM. I introduced the concept to senior executives several months ago. They have bought into the importance of KM and I am currently organizing the effort to create an organization wide program. I realize that KM isn't a program, it is a culture. For me to change the culture, I first have to show what practices should look like. 

 

I wasn't hired to do this role, but it has become my dream role to have. Since I am the owner of KM at my company, I would like my title to reflect this. I want to propose to my company to change my title etc. I do not know what title to ask for however. I know that titles include Chief Learning Officer, Chief Knowledge Officer, and Knowledge Manager. Just curious if one is more typical to have? As far as looking for other jobs in the future possible, is there a title that would be better to have on my resume?  Also, is there a list of typical responsibilities of a CKO, CLO, Knowledge Manager that someone could point me to? 

 

Thanks,

Darrin 


Boris Jaeger
 

Hi Darrin,
 
you may want to check out the Federal KMWG article
 
'The Leaders of Knowledge Initiatives: Qualifications, Roles, and Responsibilities
 
or the ATD book
 
Leading Knowledge Management and Learning: Seventeen Case Studies from the Real World of Training
 
 
More on this issue to explore on the KMedu Hub e.g.:
 
Bill's KMedu relevant articles are available from
 
Sunny regards from Germany
Boris Jaeger - "Curiosity is the beginning of all learning!"

**** CONTACT ****
jaegerWM - Web- & WissensManagement
Boris Jaeger
Albert-Stehlin Str. 6
79365 Rheinhausen
DEUTSCHLAND / GERMANY
-----
fon/fax: +49-(0)7643-913880
mobil: +49-(0)1577-7544883
-----
mail: boris.jaeger@...
home: www.jaegerWM.de


Stan Garfield
 


Paul McDowall
 

Hi Darrin,
Congratulations on getting initial interest in KM in your organization.  Here are a couple of thoughts on what you said.  In organizing an "organization wide program", just remember that you are helping them help themselves to be more effective through collaboration, Organizational Learning and KM principles and practices.  It's about applying the right practices to the real business needs, issues and opportunities, rather than developing a perfect and complete program.  I would be careful about framing your role as "owner of KM".  For this to be most effective, they have to own it from senior leaders through to and including low-level staff. If they see you as it's owner, then you are responsible for the success of KM.  You certainly won't change culture, let alone change behaviour if they see this as being your responsibilty rather than theirs.  On the subject of changing corporate culture, please don't put this unattainable challenge on yourself.  You cannot change culture.  What you can do is help people improve their performance by helping them make changes in their behaviours.  If the improvements work and stick, then you will see changed mindsets and attitudes, over time of course.  When a significant number of people take on board the improved behaviours, then you will be influencing culture.   

As to the job title, I would suggest that you look for a title that best fits with the organization and not worry about whether it's the best one for your resume. 

All the best with your great opportunity.
Paul


Albert Simard
 

Darrin –

 

First - you need to be a project/program or some such to link to the organization’s authoritative hierarchy for things like budgets, responsibilities, authority, etc.  You also need to integrate KM into the organizational structures so that it becomes a way of working.  Then, you can deal with the negotiated agreement and responsible autonomy regimes where KM functions.

Second – Yes, KM is a culture and culture trumps everything.  But don’t try to change the organizational culture.  That’s a 5-10 year undertaking, fraught with challenges, and way above your pay grade; it must come from the top.  You need KM successes a lot quicker.  Adapt KM to the existing culture.  If your KM practices make it easier for people to do their work and increase the productivity of knowledge work, culture change will follow, starting at the top.   

Third – Think big but start small.  Develop a strategic plan, but also start a project or two with a high probability of success that will mitigate a well-recognized business problem.  If a quick survey doesn’t uncover some good ideas, a directory of expertise is a good place to begin.

Fourth – Don’t be a CKO yet.  You don’t have the resources or experience to run something at a scale that reports to and supports the senior executive committee.  Be a knowledge manager.  It doesn’t threaten anyone, can function at any level (depending on who you report to), and provides a safe place to establish KM.

Fifth – Speaking of resources, one or two people can do little more than increase awareness of and promote KM.  You will need a project-scale staff of 5 or so people to actually design, develop, implement, and manage things (while someone is developing and promoting the strategy).

Sixth – You’ll notice that none of this concerns your future.  Success in your present position is the best precursor to success in your   career.  

 

For a description of more than you wanted to know about KM, see:  http://cradpdf.drdc-rddc.gc.ca/PDFS/unc121/p536618_A1b.pdf

There are a number of related presentations on my Slide Share page: http://www.slideshare.net/albertsimard

Al Simard


Douglas Weidner
 

Bill, 
Good reads.
Douglas

Have you followed the work we did at KMEF to define roles as depicted next?
 The KM Institute's Pyramid identifies the associated certification programs with each role (competency and skill)


But, probably of as much interest is the Venn Diagram showing all 'Learning Plan' needs, which should typically be another role or deliverable for a KMgr.




On Sun, Mar 13, 2016 at 9:43 PM, 'bill@...' bill@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Darrin

 

Here is a link to an article I wrote about CKOs while I was a CKO for a mid-cap consulting company in Washington DC in 2007. 

 

This is a link to a Linked In article on Knowledge Managers.  Hope these can be of some value to you.

 

Call if you have questions or I can help in any way.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: March 13, 2016 21:02
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Manager Job Responsibilities

 

 

Hello,

I have been in the field of training and development for 8 years now. I discovered knowledge management in graduate school and ever since I have been studying best practices and talking with other experts in the field. The company I work for is very behind when it comes to KM. I introduced the concept to senior executives several months ago. They have bought into the importance of KM and I am currently organizing the effort to create an organization wide program. I realize that KM isn't a program, it is a culture. For me to change the culture, I first have to show what practices should look like. 

 

I wasn't hired to do this role, but it has become my dream role to have. Since I am the owner of KM at my company, I would like my title to reflect this. I want to propose to my company to change my title etc. I do not know what title to ask for however. I know that titles include Chief Learning Officer, Chief Knowledge Officer, and Knowledge Manager. Just curious if one is more typical to have? As far as looking for other jobs in the future possible, is there a title that would be better to have on my resume?  Also, is there a list of typical responsibilities of a CKO, CLO, Knowledge Manager that someone could point me to? 

 

Thanks,

Darrin 



Douglas Weidner
 

Yes Boris, that is one of the initial works on this topic. 
Many of us early KM consultants and practitioners (in Wash DC area: 1999-2000) participated.

It is very good at hi-level skills, but maybe less so in the particulars of more recent, diverse KM Strategies, from traditional 'portal', expert locator, CoPs, etc. to more recent Human Capital, Innovation and Analytics.

On Mon, Mar 14, 2016 at 7:15 AM, 'Boris Jaeger' boris.jaeger@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi Darrin,
 
you may want to check out the Federal KMWG article
 
'The Leaders of Knowledge Initiatives: Qualifications, Roles, and Responsibilities
 
or the ATD book
 
Leading Knowledge Management and Learning: Seventeen Case Studies from the Real World of Training
 
 
More on this issue to explore on the KMedu Hub e.g.:
 
Bill's KMedu relevant articles are available from
 
Sunny regards from Germany
Boris Jaeger - "Curiosity is the beginning of all learning!"

**** CONTACT ****
jaegerWM - Web- & WissensManagement
Boris Jaeger
Albert-Stehlin Str. 6
79365 Rheinhausen
DEUTSCHLAND / GERMANY
-----
fon/fax: +49-(0)7643-913880
mobil: +49-(0)1577-7544883
-----
mail: boris.jaeger@...
home: www.jaegerWM.de