Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked? #art-of-KM


arnovation@...
 

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain? 


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100 colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback I get.


Arno






Chris Collison <chris@...>
 

Hi Arno,
Iain Thorpe’s blog  - KM on a Dollar a Day – is a good starting point.
Cheers,
Chris



From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "arnovation@... [sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Tuesday, 22 March 2016 at 17:47
To: <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain? 


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100 colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback I get.


Arno






Douglas Weidner
 

Hi Arno,

As you know, at the KM Institute "No-Budget KM" is deemed essential to transformational change leadership, aka quick wins.

"No-Budget KM" doesn't mean no cost, but rather low enough costs that it can be funded immediately, out of already allocated funds. Once initiated, such initiatives become KM Squirrels .

Our Certified K Practitioner (CKP)  and Certified K Manager (CKM) graduates, of which there are many at the World Bank, are creating hundreds of such initiatives.  I suggest you put out a data call to CKMers right inside the Bank itself.

Lacking that, you might tap into the public KM Institute LinkedIn site, or get a World Bank CKMer to tap into the Alumni site - over 7,000 graduates since 2001.

But, just in case you don't have the time, here's a list I use in class to trigger further ideas, many of which come from drilling down from these KM Squirrels ™ which focus on knowledge - intensive activities.



Douglas Weidner


On Tue, Mar 22, 2016 at 1:47 PM, arnovation@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain? 


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100 colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback I get.


Arno







Arno Boersma <arnovation@...>
 

Many thanks, Douglas. This is very useful. 
Your response is much appreciated.
Kind regards,
Arno



On Mar 22, 2016, at 15:07, Douglas Weidner douglas.weidner@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Arno,

As you know, at the KM Institute "No-Budget KM" is deemed essential to transformational change leadership, aka quick wins.

"No-Budget KM" doesn't mean no cost, but rather low enough costs that it can be funded immediately, out of already allocated funds. Once initiated, such initiatives become KM Squirrels .

Our Certified K Practitioner (CKP)  and Certified K Manager (CKM) graduates, of which there are many at the World Bank, are creating hundreds of such initiatives.  I suggest you put out a data call to CKMers right inside the Bank itself.

Lacking that, you might tap into the public KM Institute LinkedIn site, or get a World Bank CKMer to tap into the Alumni site - over 7,000 graduates since 2001.

But, just in case you don't have the time, here's a list I use in class to trigger further ideas, many of which come from drilling down from these KM Squirrels ™ which focus on knowledge - intensive activities.



Douglas Weidner


On Tue, Mar 22, 2016 at 1:47 PM, arnovation@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain? 


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100 colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback I get.


Arno







Phil Verghis
 

Hi Arno,

 

One of the simplest things that can be done is to make sure the content is easy to find/read.

 

Here is something free that you are most welcome to use/modify/share that is the standard way  knowledge is captured in for those that follow the de facto standard for knowledge in the service and support industry.

 

http://getklever.com/2015/09/09/sample-content-standard/

 

Peace,

 

Phil

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 7:08 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

 

 

Many thanks, Douglas. This is very useful. 

Your response is much appreciated.

Kind regards,

Arno

 


On Mar 22, 2016, at 15:07, Douglas Weidner douglas.weidner@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Arno,

 

As you know, at the KM Institute "No-Budget KM" is deemed essential to transformational change leadership, aka quick wins.

 

"No-Budget KM" doesn't mean no cost, but rather low enough costs that it can be funded immediately, out of already allocated funds. Once initiated, such initiatives become KM Squirrels ™.

 

Our Certified K Practitioner (CKP) ™ and Certified K Manager (CKM) graduates, of which there are many at the World Bank, are creating hundreds of such initiatives.  I suggest you put out a data call to CKMers right inside the Bank itself.

 

Lacking that, you might tap into the public KM Institute LinkedIn site, or get a World Bank CKMer to tap into the Alumni site - over 7,000 graduates since 2001.

 

But, just in case you don't have the time, here's a list I use in class to trigger further ideas, many of which come from drilling down from these KM Squirrels ™ which focus on knowledge - intensive activities.

 

<image.png>

 

Douglas Weidner

 

 

On Tue, Mar 22, 2016 at 1:47 PM, arnovation@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain? 

 

I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100 colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key challenge they have expressed.

 

The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.

 

Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me to relevant resources on this?

 

Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback I get.

 

Arno

 

 

 

 

 


Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

Arno - is your target audience using, or have access to, any type of enterprise collaboration platform (e.g., Jive, IBM Connections, etc)?

If they do, that can be a fantastic platform for doing low-cost/no-cost KM, particularly curation. These platforms are easy to configure for that type of thing, and all it costs is someone's time.

Good luck!

Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Social Workflow, Enterprise Collaboration, Knowledge Strategy
415-300-7457


Douglas Weidner
 

Tom,

 

While your recommendation to Arno seems low cost – on the surface,

I think it overlooks an essential to success, which itself could be relatively expensive or cause failure.

 

That is – proper change management.

 

In my experience, if such systems aren’t ‘bought into’, success is questionable.

 

Question is: What does ‘bought into’ really mean.

 

With your expertise in such applications, maybe you could provide some keys to success.

 

 

Douglas Weidner, Chief CKM Instructor

Executive Chairman, KM Institute

Home of KMBOK™, KMM™ and the KM Transformation Solution
www.kminstitute.org
 



      

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2016 11:02 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

 

 

Arno - is your target audience using, or have access to, any type of enterprise collaboration platform (e.g., Jive, IBM Connections, etc)?

If they do, that can be a fantastic platform for doing low-cost/no-cost KM, particularly curation. These platforms are easy to configure for that type of thing, and all it costs is someone's time.

Good luck!

Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Social Workflow, Enterprise Collaboration, Knowledge Strategy
415-300-7457


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Arno & Chris,

I am going to be controversial. *Most* KM ideas should not require additional budget. The ones that do should do one of these three things:

1. Gather data about your organisation to help you understand your problems better
2. Bring in external expertise, either for specialist KM intervention design and implementation, or to provide a baseline KM capability (if none exists internally)
3. Recruit additional staff where no sufficient time surplus exists to allow a change effort to occur (rare but possible)

Even these are potentially optional expenses if an organisation has a KM team on staff, management support for their activities, a willingness to prioritise systemic change, and/or an acceptance of open source software.

I am generally against KM technology implementations unless a business area is prepared to stump up the cost to implement it. This is because most technologies are implemented for productivity and quality reasons rather than 'pure' KM considerations.

I would definitely steer people away from "boil the ocean"-style KM activities that attempt to apply a universal intervention across a whole organisation. Bluntly, these never succeed.

Rather, KM people should identify specific business problems and triage their cause as a deficiency in one or more of business processing, knowledge processing, information processing, or problem identification.

The cause should then be addressed through a specific intervention that aims to sustainably change the system in a way that redresses or avoids that deficiency.

So the classic KM cycle is:

Identify problem -> Intervene -> Evaluate success
^ |
+----------------------------------+

More ambitious interventions attempt multiple safe-fail interventions and evaluations in parallel to speed up evolution of organisational systems. I wouldn't recommend this to novices though.

Taking your specific example:

"Library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but many are unaware and thus they are underutilized".

That's not good enough from a KM perspective. Are you just wishing that your library was useful to people? Or do you have documented problems that are being caused by a lack of knowledge? If so:

- Who has these problems?
- Are the problems once off or ongoing?
- What was the impact (tangible or intangible) of that lack of knowledge?
- Who cares if that risk of knowledge failure is lowered or removed?
- Is their perceived value of reducing the risk worth the resource effort of the intervention?

If you don't know at least this much to start with, you're doing "faith-based" KM. I don't recommend it.

Assuming you *can* demonstrate this and have more than one problem fitting these criteria, you then need a way to rank their relative value and to do the highest value one first.

Agile backlogs are a great way to make this transparent to the organisation, get buy-in, demonstrate success, and to progressively fix problems within a fixed resource envelope.

Following this approach should mean that you only need to ask for budget when there's already a clear case for why it should be spent in the first place.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@knowquestion.com.au
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 23/03/2016 4:52 AM, Chris Collison chris@collison.com [sikmleaders] wrote:
Hi Arno,
Iain Thorpe’s blog - KM on a Dollar a Da
<https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/>y
<https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/> – is a good starting point.
Cheers,
Chris



From: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
on behalf of "arnovation@yahoo.com <mailto:arnovation@yahoo.com>
[sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Tuesday, 22 March 2016 at 17:47
To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain?


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100
colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative
novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like
Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key
challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical
knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our
library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me
to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback
I get.


Arno






Chris Collison <chris@...>
 

Hi Stephen,
I don’t think you’re being that controversial! I agree with you. (Or perhaps we’re just both controversial!)

Conversation, reflection, leadership, curiosity, mutually-beneficial collaboration and sharing should all be low cost things to pilot - and even low cost things to scale up.

The work done initially by UNAIDS (Self Assessment and River Diagram) which evolved into the AIDS Constellation is a nice example of this, and t’s now been reapplied in the context of Malaria and Ebola. http://constellation.helsekompetanse.no/atutor/index.php

Cheers,
Chris

___________

On 24/03/2016, 00:03, "Stephen Bounds km@bounds.net.au [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi Arno & Chris,

I am going to be controversial. *Most* KM ideas should not require
additional budget. The ones that do should do one of these three things:

1. Gather data about your organisation to help you understand your
problems better
2. Bring in external expertise, either for specialist KM intervention
design and implementation, or to provide a baseline KM capability (if
none exists internally)
3. Recruit additional staff where no sufficient time surplus exists to
allow a change effort to occur (rare but possible)

Even these are potentially optional expenses if an organisation has a KM
team on staff, management support for their activities, a willingness to
prioritise systemic change, and/or an acceptance of open source software.

I am generally against KM technology implementations unless a business
area is prepared to stump up the cost to implement it. This is because
most technologies are implemented for productivity and quality reasons
rather than 'pure' KM considerations.

I would definitely steer people away from "boil the ocean"-style KM
activities that attempt to apply a universal intervention across a whole
organisation. Bluntly, these never succeed.

Rather, KM people should identify specific business problems and triage
their cause as a deficiency in one or more of business processing,
knowledge processing, information processing, or problem identification.

The cause should then be addressed through a specific intervention that
aims to sustainably change the system in a way that redresses or avoids
that deficiency.

So the classic KM cycle is:

Identify problem -> Intervene -> Evaluate success
^ |
+----------------------------------+

More ambitious interventions attempt multiple safe-fail interventions
and evaluations in parallel to speed up evolution of organisational
systems. I wouldn't recommend this to novices though.

Taking your specific example:

"Library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
many are unaware and thus they are underutilized".

That's not good enough from a KM perspective. Are you just wishing that
your library was useful to people? Or do you have documented problems
that are being caused by a lack of knowledge? If so:

- Who has these problems?
- Are the problems once off or ongoing?
- What was the impact (tangible or intangible) of that lack of knowledge?
- Who cares if that risk of knowledge failure is lowered or removed?
- Is their perceived value of reducing the risk worth the resource
effort of the intervention?

If you don't know at least this much to start with, you're doing
"faith-based" KM. I don't recommend it.

Assuming you *can* demonstrate this and have more than one problem
fitting these criteria, you then need a way to rank their relative value
and to do the highest value one first.

Agile backlogs are a great way to make this transparent to the
organisation, get buy-in, demonstrate success, and to progressively fix
problems within a fixed resource envelope.

Following this approach should mean that you only need to ask for budget
when there's already a clear case for why it should be spent in the
first place.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@knowquestion.com.au
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 23/03/2016 4:52 AM, Chris Collison chris@collison.com [sikmleaders]
wrote:
Hi Arno,
Iain Thorpe’s blog - KM on a Dollar a Da
<https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/>y
<https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/> – is a good starting point.
Cheers,
Chris



From: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
on behalf of "arnovation@yahoo.com <mailto:arnovation@yahoo.com>
[sikmleaders]"
Reply-To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Tuesday, 22 March 2016 at 17:47
To: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

Hi all,

May I pick your collective KM brain?


I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100
colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative
novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like
Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key
challenge they have expressed.


The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical
knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our
library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.


Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me
to relevant resources on this?


Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback
I get.


Arno






------------------------------------
Posted by: Stephen Bounds <km@bounds.net.au>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



tman9999@...
 

Thanks, Doug - good points.

When it comes to leveraging collaboration platforms to get work done (as opposed to efforts focused on driving adoption of said platform), I approach it opportunistically, looking for groups and individuals that have already demonstrated buy-in and adoption. Let's call these users "collaboration advocates."

Then it becomes a matter of defining the business problem that needs addressing. In Arno's case, that means describing how content curation maps to a business need (ideally a critical business need). From there it's a matter of working closely with these advocates to co-develop a solution on the collaboration platform, which itself can be thought of as a lightweight, end-user configurable application development platform. The emphasis should be on getting something up and testing it quickly (agile approach), and iterating on it to refine it. Again, these platforms are excellent at supporting this type of model (and they handle all content types beautifully).

And that's it. You just entrained a willing, knowledgeable group of volunteers to help you build a new application on a system you already have, that they already know how to use. From there it becomes a matter of making others aware of the new capability you've just built, which is best done by developing some examples that showcase how well it works and making it easy for others to find, access and use for their own purposes. 

Cheers,

Tom

Tom Short Consulting
Social Workflow, Enterprise Collaboration, Knowledge Strategy
415-300-7457


Stan Garfield
 

Arno, there have already been some great replies to your question. Here are my thoughts.

You can recruit KM champions to support KM in addition to their formal roles, at no incremental cost. You can create processes at little or no cost and use free tools for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning. You can inspire people to demonstrate desired behaviors through leadership, recognition, and gamification.

It's desirable, but not required, to have at least one person leading a KM effort, so a KM budget should include that cost. It's also good to hold an in-person meeting at least once a year with all KM champions, so budget for the cost of such a meeting. If you need to license any tools and get support for them, include those costs.

An example is this community. The 600+ members voluntarily spend their time reading and posting in this forum, attending and presenting on the monthly calls, and attending the annual dinner at KMWorld. The tools we use are free (Yahoo group, SlideShare) or low-cost (dial-in line, annual dinner). The results are useful to the members. So if you follow this model, you should expect similar benefits.


Albert Simard
 

A no/low budget for KM indicates a lack of senior management support, without which KM will eventually fail.  You’ll be trying to push a rope uphill.  Been there, done that, got the scars to prove it!  If you have a lot of charisma, you can try marketing KM to get the necessary support.  If a middle manager is willing to sponsor and support a project-scale activity, there is a good chance of success through solving a recognized business problem.  But then, there’s the hazardous transition from project to program scale that will eventually have to be overcome.  Even a 5-person highly successful project couldn’t overcome a new executive with a different agenda. 

 

Not knowing you or your situation, I cannot advise you beyond relaying my experience.

 

Al    


Douglas Weidner
 

Albert,

 

Your experience is common, but doesn’t negate the necessity to often have a ‘bottom up’ approach vs. ‘top down’.

 

Here’s an over-simplification based on my experience and what we teach at the KM Institute:

·         To be successful at ‘bottom up’ you need to get Results, Results, Results.  See Tom Short’s posting.

·         To be successful at ‘top down’ you need cultural change. I’ve seen many examples of ‘top down’ push, but little ultimate success.

 

At the KM Institute we have a proven principle,

“If you can’t do KM Squirrels (aka bottom up, no-budget, tactical KM initiatives), also called ‘Quick Wins’ in the transformational change mgmt literature,

how do you expect to be able to do KM Bulls (top-down, funded, strategic initiatives).

KM is like solving a ‘simultaneous equation’ (recall high school math?).

 

Each situation is different, as you mentioned, but top down approaches alone fail as often as bottom up.

 

It is just that few want to admit the typical mediocre success of many strategic initiatives, without cultural change.

 

Fewer still seem to want to address the requisite cultural change necessary to migrate from the Info Age to the Knowledge Age.

But that is another topic entirely.

 

 

Douglas Weidner, Chief CKM Instructor

Executive Chairman, KM Institute

Home of KMBOK™, KMM™ and the KM Transformation Solution
www.kminstitute.org
 



      

 

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2016 11:15 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

 

 

A no/low budget for KM indicates a lack of senior management support, without which KM will eventually fail.  You’ll be trying to push a rope uphill.  Been there, done that, got the scars to prove it!  If you have a lot of charisma, you can try marketing KM to get the necessary support.  If a middle manager is willing to sponsor and support a project-scale activity, there is a good chance of success through solving a recognized business problem.  But then, there’s the hazardous transition from project to program scale that will eventually have to be overcome.  Even a 5-person highly successful project couldn’t overcome a new executive with a different agenda. 

 

Not knowing you or your situation, I cannot advise you beyond relaying my experience.

 

Al    


Arno Boersma <arnovation@...>
 

Thanks, Stan. Very useful.
And indeed, we're practicing what we preach in real time in terms of low-cost, effective ways for KM, as we use this group to crowdsource ideas. 
Thanks again,
Arno




On Mar 24, 2016, at 09:51, stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Arno, there have already been some great replies to your question. Here are my thoughts.

You can recruit KM champions to support KM in addition to their formal roles, at no incremental cost. You can create processes at little or no cost and use free tools for sharing, innovating, reusing, collaborating, and learning. You can inspire people to demonstrate desired behaviors through leadership, recognition, and gamification.

It's desirable, but not required, to have at least one person leading a KM effort, so a KM budget should include that cost. It's also good to hold an in-person meeting at least once a year with all KM champions, so budget for the cost of such a meeting. If you need to license any tools and get support for them, include those costs.

An example is this community. The 600+ members voluntarily spend their time reading and posting in this forum, attending and presenting on the monthly calls, and attending the annual dinner at KMWorld. The tools we use are free (Yahoo group, SlideShare) or low-cost (dial-in line, annual dinner). The results are useful to the members. So if you follow this model, you should expect similar benefits.


Douglas Weidner
 

Tom,

Excellent approach.

 

 

Douglas Weidner, Chief CKM Instructor

Executive Chairman, KM Institute

Home of KMBOK™, KMM™ and the KM Transformation Solution
www.kminstitute.org
 



      

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:39 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Re: Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

 

 

Thanks, Doug - good points.

 

When it comes to leveraging collaboration platforms to get work done (as opposed to efforts focused on driving adoption of said platform), I approach it opportunistically, looking for groups and individuals that have already demonstrated buy-in and adoption. Let's call these users "collaboration advocates."

 

Then it becomes a matter of defining the business problem that needs addressing. In Arno's case, that means describing how content curation maps to a business need (ideally a critical business need). From there it's a matter of working closely with these advocates to co-develop a solution on the collaboration platform, which itself can be thought of as a lightweight, end-user configurable application development platform. The emphasis should be on getting something up and testing it quickly (agile approach), and iterating on it to refine it. Again, these platforms are excellent at supporting this type of model (and they handle all content types beautifully).

 

And that's it. You just entrained a willing, knowledgeable group of volunteers to help you build a new application on a system you already have, that they already know how to use. From there it becomes a matter of making others aware of the new capability you've just built, which is best done by developing some examples that showcase how well it works and making it easy for others to find, access and use for their own purposes. 

 

Cheers,

 

Tom

 

Tom Short Consulting

Social Workflow, Enterprise Collaboration, Knowledge Strategy

415-300-7457

 


Paul McDowall
 

Hi Arno,
You have received some really excellent replies already.  For my two cents I'd help them focus in on identifying, selecting and addressing the real business needs, issues and opportunities within their respective sub-organizational units.  One of the greatest success factors for KM is to help business people be more effective, solve real business problems, meet real business needs, achieve real business opportunities.  While there are lots and lots of good ideas from around the KM experience, their focus, IMHO, should be on the business needs that their people have.  Sometimes we look for a grand and new practice or tool to import but don't look for the real needs of the people.  The only way they can get real traction in their organization is to help their respective managers and staff be more effective.  Identifying real business needs, issues and opportunities is a great skill for any KMer as it also involves developing real working relationships with their key stakeholders and partners.
Best
Paul


arno boersma <arnovation@...>
 

Hi All,
As promised, I am looping back into our collective brain. Many thanks for all of your insights in this thread. 

In addition to your suggestions, let me briefly note the relatively low-cost tools/techniques we presented/applied in our workshop (fyi, low-cost to the user, not necessarily to the institution). Also, not all are purely KM tools/techniques, but they are certainly items that can make the life of a knowledge professional easier:
- Library Resources: we used Oxford Analytica as an example of setting up automatic feeds;
- Personal Conference Line: all World Bank staff have one, but many do not know about it;
- Jabber: some key functionalities such as screen sharing;
- 30min Knowledge Dissemination intake: a checklist for quickly discussing how best to disseminate a knowledge product with a task team leader;
- Tableau: examples of how to visualize data for decision-making;
- Crowdsourcing: we discussed pros and cons of email, our Jive platform and SurveyMonkey
- After Action Review: a simple technique to ensure lessons learned are captured for future projects;
- PollEverywhere: an online tool to engage audiences;
- Email to Jive; an easy way to add a Jive address to an email so that it will appear in a specific Jive group/space.

Thanks again!
On to the next workshop: How to stay on top of your topic as an expert? Ideas very welcome!

Arno
 




On Sunday, March 27, 2016 9:53 PM, Arno Boersma


Thanks, Stephen. I appreciate your insights. And fully agree, whatever we focus on should address a clear business need/problem. 
Arno




On Mar 23, 2016, at 20:03, Stephen Bounds km@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 
Hi Arno & Chris,

I am going to be controversial. *Most* KM ideas should not require
additional budget. The ones that do should do one of these three things:

1. Gather data about your organisation to help you understand your
problems better
2. Bring in external expertise, either for specialist KM intervention
design and implementation, or to provide a baseline KM capability (if
none exists internally)
3. Recruit additional staff where no sufficient time surplus exists to
allow a change effort to occur (rare but possible)

Even these are potentially optional expenses if an organisation has a KM
team on staff, management support for their activities, a willingness to
prioritise systemic change, and/or an acceptance of open source software.

I am generally against KM technology implementations unless a business
area is prepared to stump up the cost to implement it. This is because
most technologies are implemented for productivity and quality reasons
rather than 'pure' KM considerations.

I would definitely steer people away from "boil the ocean"-style KM
activities that attempt to apply a universal intervention across a whole
organisation. Bluntly, these never succeed.

Rather, KM people should identify specific business problems and triage
their cause as a deficiency in one or more of business processing,
knowledge processing, information processing, or problem identification.

The cause should then be addressed through a specific intervention that
aims to sustainably change the system in a way that redresses or avoids
that deficiency.

So the classic KM cycle is:

Identify problem -> Intervene -> Evaluate success
^ |
+----------------------------------+

More ambitious interventions attempt multiple safe-fail interventions
and evaluations in parallel to speed up evolution of organisational
systems. I wouldn't recommend this to novices though.

Taking your specific example:

"Library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
many are unaware and thus they are underutilized".

That's not good enough from a KM perspective. Are you just wishing that
your library was useful to people? Or do you have documented problems
that are being caused by a lack of knowledge? If so:

- Who has these problems?
- Are the problems once off or ongoing?
- What was the impact (tangible or intangible) of that lack of knowledge?
- Who cares if that risk of knowledge failure is lowered or removed?
- Is their perceived value of reducing the risk worth the resource
effort of the intervention?

If you don't know at least this much to start with, you're doing
"faith-based" KM. I don't recommend it.

Assuming you *can* demonstrate this and have more than one problem
fitting these criteria, you then need a way to rank their relative value
and to do the highest value one first.

Agile backlogs are a great way to make this transparent to the
organisation, get buy-in, demonstrate success, and to progressively fix
problems within a fixed resource envelope.

Following this approach should mean that you only need to ask for budget
when there's already a clear case for why it should be spent in the
first place.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 23/03/2016 4:52 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
> Hi Arno,
> Iain Thorpe’s blog - KM on a Dollar a Da
> <https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/>y
> <https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/> – is a good starting point.
> Cheers,
> Chris
>
>
>
> From: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> on behalf of "arnovation@... <mailto:arnovation@...>
> [sikmleaders]"
> Reply-To: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> Date: Tuesday, 22 March 2016 at 17:47
> To: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> Subject: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?
>
> Hi all,
>
> May I pick your collective KM brain?
>
>
> I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100
> colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative
> novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like
> Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key
> challenge they have expressed.
>
>
> The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical
> knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our
> library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
> many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.
>
>
> Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me
> to relevant resources on this?
>
>
> Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback
> I get.
>
>
> Arno
>
>
>
>
>
>



Phil Verghis
 

Arno,

 

Thanks for closing the loop…

 

Peace,

 

Phil

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 11:18 AM
To: yahoogroups <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?

 

 

Hi All,

As promised, I am looping back into our collective brain. Many thanks for all of your insights in this thread. 

 

In addition to your suggestions, let me briefly note the relatively low-cost tools/techniques we presented/applied in our workshop (fyi, low-cost to the user, not necessarily to the institution). Also, not all are purely KM tools/techniques, but they are certainly items that can make the life of a knowledge professional easier:

- Library Resources: we used Oxford Analytica as an example of setting up automatic feeds;

- Personal Conference Line: all World Bank staff have one, but many do not know about it;

- Jabber: some key functionalities such as screen sharing;

- 30min Knowledge Dissemination intake: a checklist for quickly discussing how best to disseminate a knowledge product with a task team leader;

- Tableau: examples of how to visualize data for decision-making;

- Crowdsourcing: we discussed pros and cons of email, our Jive platform and SurveyMonkey

- After Action Review: a simple technique to ensure lessons learned are captured for future projects;

- PollEverywhere: an online tool to engage audiences;

- Email to Jive; an easy way to add a Jive address to an email so that it will appear in a specific Jive group/space.

 

Thanks again!

On to the next workshop: How to stay on top of your topic as an expert? Ideas very welcome!

 

Arno

 

 

 

 

On Sunday, March 27, 2016 9:53 PM, Arno Boersma <arnovation@...> wrote:

 

Thanks, Stephen. I appreciate your insights. And fully agree, whatever we focus on should address a clear business need/problem. 

Arno




On Mar 23, 2016, at 20:03, Stephen Bounds km@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Arno & Chris,

I am going to be controversial. *Most* KM ideas should not require
additional budget. The ones that do should do one of these three things:

1. Gather data about your organisation to help you understand your
problems better
2. Bring in external expertise, either for specialist KM intervention
design and implementation, or to provide a baseline KM capability (if
none exists internally)
3. Recruit additional staff where no sufficient time surplus exists to
allow a change effort to occur (rare but possible)

Even these are potentially optional expenses if an organisation has a KM
team on staff, management support for their activities, a willingness to
prioritise systemic change, and/or an acceptance of open source software.

I am generally against KM technology implementations unless a business
area is prepared to stump up the cost to implement it. This is because
most technologies are implemented for productivity and quality reasons
rather than 'pure' KM considerations.

I would definitely steer people away from "boil the ocean"-style KM
activities that attempt to apply a universal intervention across a whole
organisation. Bluntly, these never succeed.

Rather, KM people should identify specific business problems and triage
their cause as a deficiency in one or more of business processing,
knowledge processing, information processing, or problem identification.

The cause should then be addressed through a specific intervention that
aims to sustainably change the system in a way that redresses or avoids
that deficiency.

So the classic KM cycle is:

Identify problem -> Intervene -> Evaluate success
^ |
+----------------------------------+

More ambitious interventions attempt multiple safe-fail interventions
and evaluations in parallel to speed up evolution of organisational
systems. I wouldn't recommend this to novices though.

Taking your specific example:

"Library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
many are unaware and thus they are underutilized".

That's not good enough from a KM perspective. Are you just wishing that
your library was useful to people? Or do you have documented problems
that are being caused by a lack of knowledge? If so:

- Who has these problems?
- Are the problems once off or ongoing?
- What was the impact (tangible or intangible) of that lack of knowledge?
- Who cares if that risk of knowledge failure is lowered or removed?
- Is their perceived value of reducing the risk worth the resource
effort of the intervention?

If you don't know at least this much to start with, you're doing
"faith-based" KM. I don't recommend it.

Assuming you *can* demonstrate this and have more than one problem
fitting these criteria, you then need a way to rank their relative value
and to do the highest value one first.

Agile backlogs are a great way to make this transparent to the
organisation, get buy-in, demonstrate success, and to progressively fix
problems within a fixed resource envelope.

Following this approach should mean that you only need to ask for budget
when there's already a clear case for why it should be spent in the
first place.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Director & Principal Consultant
knowquestion Pty Ltd
E: sb@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 23/03/2016 4:52 AM, Chris Collison chris@... [sikmleaders]
wrote:
> Hi Arno,
> Iain Thorpe’s blog - KM on a Dollar a Da
> <https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/>y
> <https://kmonadollaraday.wordpress.com/> – is a good starting point.
> Cheers,
> Chris
>
>
>
> From: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> on behalf of "arnovation@... <mailto:arnovation@...>
> [sikmleaders]"
> Reply-To: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> Date: Tuesday, 22 March 2016 at 17:47
> To: <sikmleaders@... <mailto:sikmleaders@...>>
> Subject: [sikmleaders] Any no / low budget KM ideas that have worked?
>
> Hi all,
>
> May I pick your collective KM brain?
>
>
> I'm developing a series of workshops at the World Bank for 100
> colleagues who have a new knowledge broker-like role but are relative
> novices to KM. (I am doing this with help from some great folks like
> Nancy Dixon and Joachim Stroh, btw). Each workshop will address a key
> challenge they have expressed.
>
>
> The first workshop will be about doing KM on a shoestring, practical
> knowledge activities with impact but at low or no cost. For example, our
> library services are a great free source of info and news feeds, but
> many are unaware and thus they are underutilized.
>
>
> Anyone have any ideas for no/low cost KM activities? Or who can point me
> to relevant resources on this?
>
>
> Many thanks and I promise to feed our collective brain with the feedback
> I get.
>
>
> Arno
>
>
>
>
>
>