Topics

Knowledge Transfer Tool #knowledge-retention #knowledge-transfer


jeffrey.keefer@...
 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?


Thank you.


Jeffrey



David Smith <davidlamarsmith@...>
 

Here is my general outline

Planning session with retiree

Determine critical knowledge from retiree viewpoint

Define resources (documents & people) of knowledge

List who seeks support from retiree

Determine plan to collect and store retiree knowledge library

Planning session with people who seek support from retiree

Include retiree peers and organization + include replacement

Determine critical knowledge needed from their viewpoint – Critical Knowledge Form is a guide

Compare knowledge needs with retiree knowledge list and determine knowledge gaps

Build plan to transfer knowledge and fill gaps


David Smith

On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:28 PM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?


Thank you.


Jeffrey



Russell Van liew
 

Hi Jeffrey,

I don’t have a specific process or a list, but I have used mind mapping tools to walk through the activity and resources around what someone has been doing.  Using a mind map is a starter to understanding all the areas, functions, teams, tools, services, etc.. that someone may use.  This usually prompts more questions and by calling out certain bubbles, I can go back and contact other teams, people or resources to dig deeper if I need to.  Mind map tools also let you highlight, link, connect and note information, which will help in your mapping for others.

When using the tool the conversation usually starts out as a what they do in a day and then expands out as the person is talking.  You start with what ‘usually’ happens and as they are talking other topics come up around what doesn’t happen as often or conversation triggers for knowledge that has been gained over the years.  Start with your center – your employee- then map out from there.  People then tend to start remembering other areas they need to ‘mention’ to you.

Once you have the map “mapped” out – you can then validate again with the employee.  As you validate what you have document you can use a list like what David posted to make sure you have main areas.  Chances are you aren’t going to get everything, but starting with a ‘day in the life’ can lead you down the path of the most important items and using mind map tool can help you capture as you go along.  You then have a nice mapping that you can show other employees who need to work on or understand the process.

Just my thoughts – hope it helps.

I have been using FreeMind to do this.  You may end up with multiple maps, but it really helps to map out an unknown process.

-Russell

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2016 2:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Here is my general outline

 

Planning session with retiree

Determine critical knowledge from retiree viewpoint

Define resources (documents & people) of knowledge

List who seeks support from retiree

Determine plan to collect and store retiree knowledge library

Planning session with people who seek support from retiree

Include retiree peers and organization + include replacement

Determine critical knowledge needed from their viewpoint – Critical Knowledge Form is a guide

Compare knowledge needs with retiree knowledge list and determine knowledge gaps

Build plan to transfer knowledge and fill gaps


David Smith


On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:28 PM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 


Jeffrey Keefer <jeffrey.keefer@...>
 

David, this is a helpful outline.

 

How do you begin the conversation about “critical knowledge” with the retiree, given that that language is not common in practice outside a KM context?

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2016 4:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Here is my general outline

 

Planning session with retiree

Determine critical knowledge from retiree viewpoint

Define resources (documents & people) of knowledge

List who seeks support from retiree

Determine plan to collect and store retiree knowledge library

Planning session with people who seek support from retiree

Include retiree peers and organization + include replacement

Determine critical knowledge needed from their viewpoint – Critical Knowledge Form is a guide

Compare knowledge needs with retiree knowledge list and determine knowledge gaps

Build plan to transfer knowledge and fill gaps


David Smith


On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:28 PM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 


Jeffrey Keefer <jeffrey.keefer@...>
 

Thanks for this suggestion, Russell. I have recently purchased two mind mapping tools (each one had a useful feature the other did not, so voila!) and had not considered this as a strategy to begin the process.

 

Thinking about knowledge transfer as a brainstorming / mapping activity,

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2016 5:34 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

I don’t have a specific process or a list, but I have used mind mapping tools to walk through the activity and resources around what someone has been doing.  Using a mind map is a starter to understanding all the areas, functions, teams, tools, services, etc.. that someone may use.  This usually prompts more questions and by calling out certain bubbles, I can go back and contact other teams, people or resources to dig deeper if I need to.  Mind map tools also let you highlight, link, connect and note information, which will help in your mapping for others.

When using the tool the conversation usually starts out as a what they do in a day and then expands out as the person is talking.  You start with what ‘usually’ happens and as they are talking other topics come up around what doesn’t happen as often or conversation triggers for knowledge that has been gained over the years.  Start with your center – your employee- then map out from there.  People then tend to start remembering other areas they need to ‘mention’ to you.

Once you have the map “mapped” out – you can then validate again with the employee.  As you validate what you have document you can use a list like what David posted to make sure you have main areas.  Chances are you aren’t going to get everything, but starting with a ‘day in the life’ can lead you down the path of the most important items and using mind map tool can help you capture as you go along.  You then have a nice mapping that you can show other employees who need to work on or understand the process.

Just my thoughts – hope it helps.

I have been using FreeMind to do this.  You may end up with multiple maps, but it really helps to map out an unknown process.

-Russell

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2016 2:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Here is my general outline

 

Planning session with retiree

Determine critical knowledge from retiree viewpoint

Define resources (documents & people) of knowledge

List who seeks support from retiree

Determine plan to collect and store retiree knowledge library

Planning session with people who seek support from retiree

Include retiree peers and organization + include replacement

Determine critical knowledge needed from their viewpoint – Critical Knowledge Form is a guide

Compare knowledge needs with retiree knowledge list and determine knowledge gaps

Build plan to transfer knowledge and fill gaps


David Smith


On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:28 PM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 


David Smith <davidlamarsmith@...>
 

You are right in that asking a person to give you their critical knowledge will get you no where. It helps if you have some familiarity with what the person does, but that is not a requirement. Good general people skills in conversation is important. 

I start by asking:
When you leave, what are the top things that you do that this company may have difficulty doing?
What major decisions do you see will need to be made in the next few years where you would have provided input in the past. 
Etc.

If the person is a willing participant who wants see things continue to go well, then it is not difficult. If they see you as just another waste of their time till retirement day then you will not be successful. The key is input from the retiree and then from the peers helps one get a good picture of the issues and make some decisions about priorities.  

David Smith

On Jul 19, 2016, at 9:22 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

David, this is a helpful outline.

 

How do you begin the conversation about “critical knowledge” with the retiree, given that that language is not common in practice outside a KM context?

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2016 4:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Here is my general outline

 

Planning session with retiree

Determine critical knowledge from retiree viewpoint

Define resources (documents & people) of knowledge

List who seeks support from retiree

Determine plan to collect and store retiree knowledge library

Planning session with people who seek support from retiree

Include retiree peers and organization + include replacement

Determine critical knowledge needed from their viewpoint – Critical Knowledge Form is a guide

Compare knowledge needs with retiree knowledge list and determine knowledge gaps

Build plan to transfer knowledge and fill gaps


David Smith


On Jul 14, 2016, at 2:28 PM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 


Murray Jennex
 

I have an approach described in the attached paper...murray jennex, san diego state university
 

In a message dated 7/14/2016 12:28:32 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?


Thank you.


Jeffrey



Murray Jennex
 

I probably should have discussed it some.  The process is for all transience, not just retirees and also includes a predictor approach to help determine who is likely to leave so you can start capturing knowledge early...murray
 

In a message dated 7/19/2016 9:09:09 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


I have an approach described in the attached paper...murray jennex, san diego state university
 
In a message dated 7/14/2016 12:28:32 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, sikmleaders@... writes:


I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?


Thank you.


Jeffrey



Randhir Pushpa
 

Hi Jeffrey,

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 
 
When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

Regards

Randhir

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?


Thank you.


Jeffrey




Jeffrey Keefer <jeffrey.keefer@...>
 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 


Nancy Dixon
 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   
Nancy

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 



Randhir Pushpa
 

While doing Knowledge transfer (KT) when an employee leaves ensures that their knowledge is captured, isn't it a reactive approach? It is also a difficult situation to do KT since employees may not be motivated to share their knowledge. Shouldn't organizations go for a proactive approach where they identify the critical knowledge that the organization needs to know and capture the same from its employees. Once a Knowledge dictionary is created on the different sets of critical knowledge that a organization needs to safe guard, the same can be captured through the different knowledge capturing techniques. 

This approach has got two benefits. One benefit is that they get better quality knowledge and the employee sharing the knowledge will also be under the obligation to share. The second benefit is that KT will be managed in a much better way. When an employee exits organization will be clear what they might lose and accordingly plan the KT (if required).

Regards

Randhir

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   
Nancy

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 




Nancy White
 

Wow, if my life had more organization and time, this would be a great thread to summarize. Recently I've been working with communities of and surrounding people with developmental disabilities and there is a process called Person Centered Planning (http://rtc.umn.edu/docs/pcpmanual1.pdf) that uses a technique that I think lends itself to the existing knowledge worker, just a bit in reverse. Key to the process is the literal visualization of someone's dreams for themselves. For a departing K working that might be all the history stories she or he most values. The stories are told not one on one, but in a community setting where not only the person who is creating their plan speaks, but all those around her or him. Imagine this with a departing coworker. Not only a great way to visualize and connect to the departing knowledge, but to acknowledge the presence and gifts of that person. (examples: http://www.apbs.org/new_apbs/images/community-agencies-img7.jpg http://www.jackiedearden.co.uk/graphics/normal/SOL+PATH-1.jpg )

Then, afterwards, the visual artifact - while it certainly does not capture all explicit nor implicit knowledge, maps key ideas to the person and the knowlege. Things are somehow more accessible.

This visualized approach shows up in things like the business model canvas and the many variants that have emerged. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Model_Canvas http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas/bmc and others

Just a little visual thought triggered from the mind map suggestion!

N


On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 8:14 AM, 'Randhir R.P' randhir.rp@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


While doing Knowledge transfer (KT) when an employee leaves ensures that their knowledge is captured, isn't it a reactive approach? It is also a difficult situation to do KT since employees may not be motivated to share their knowledge. Shouldn't organizations go for a proactive approach where they identify the critical knowledge that the organization needs to know and capture the same from its employees. Once a Knowledge dictionary is created on the different sets of critical knowledge that a organization needs to safe guard, the same can be captured through the different knowledge capturing techniques. 

This approach has got two benefits. One benefit is that they get better quality knowledge and the employee sharing the knowledge will also be under the obligation to share. The second benefit is that KT will be managed in a much better way. When an employee exits organization will be clear what they might lose and accordingly plan the KT (if required).

Regards

Randhir

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   
Nancy

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 







Arthur Shelley
 

Thanks Nancy,

 

Great reminder that tools can be something quite intangible as can be the knowledge transfer in itself.

The insight that is often missed is that we don’t just transfer what we know, “the knowledge” in question is absorbed and reformed in the recipient to co-create new knowledge in their mind. We explored this co-creation of knowledge through visuals and conversation in the SIKM Leaders call on Tuesday.

For some people it is a bit “fluffy”, but the reality is it is a more effective way to share and build knowledge that many of the “tangible tools and processes.”

 

Humans are social creatures who have developed through identity, connection and emotional bonds (both with each other and also with ideas and concepts. This is why conversation, story, metaphor, humour, trust and relationships are all essential foundations of knowledge transfer (which itself is a part of co-creation of new understandings – otherwise it remains static and becomes less relevant to future contexts).

 

By the way (in response to your desire to summarise): Smart people are always busy, otherwise they get into that terrible situation of being bored!  Not something that members of this forum allow themselves to become!

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, 18 August 2016 1:47 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Wow, if my life had more organization and time, this would be a great thread to summarize. Recently I've been working with communities of and surrounding people with developmental disabilities and there is a process called Person Centered Planning (http://rtc.umn.edu/docs/pcpmanual1.pdf) that uses a technique that I think lends itself to the existing knowledge worker, just a bit in reverse. Key to the process is the literal visualization of someone's dreams for themselves. For a departing K working that might be all the history stories she or he most values. The stories are told not one on one, but in a community setting where not only the person who is creating their plan speaks, but all those around her or him. Imagine this with a departing coworker. Not only a great way to visualize and connect to the departing knowledge, but to acknowledge the presence and gifts of that person. (examples: http://www.apbs.org/new_apbs/images/community-agencies-img7.jpg http://www.jackiedearden.co.uk/graphics/normal/SOL+PATH-1.jpg )

 

Then, afterwards, the visual artifact - while it certainly does not capture all explicit nor implicit knowledge, maps key ideas to the person and the knowlege. Things are somehow more accessible.

 

This visualized approach shows up in things like the business model canvas and the many variants that have emerged. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Model_Canvas http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas/bmc and others

 

Just a little visual thought triggered from the mind map suggestion!

N

 

 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 8:14 AM, 'Randhir R.P' randhir.rp@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

While doing Knowledge transfer (KT) when an employee leaves ensures that their knowledge is captured, isn't it a reactive approach? It is also a difficult situation to do KT since employees may not be motivated to share their knowledge. Shouldn't organizations go for a proactive approach where they identify the critical knowledge that the organization needs to know and capture the same from its employees. Once a Knowledge dictionary is created on the different sets of critical knowledge that a organization needs to safe guard, the same can be captured through the different knowledge capturing techniques. 

 

This approach has got two benefits. One benefit is that they get better quality knowledge and the employee sharing the knowledge will also be under the obligation to share. The second benefit is that KT will be managed in a much better way. When an employee exits organization will be clear what they might lose and accordingly plan the KT (if required).

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   

Nancy

 

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 

 

 

 

 


Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Randhir et al,

 

I agree this is an excellent theoretical framework and every organisation that has this (which most don’t) will no doubt benefit from it.

 

However, alone it is not an optimal approach. Language is a free living thing and cannot deliver its real value and be part of the culture if words and definitions are just “captured”. It is good to define what you mean in knowledge dictionaries (and policies, procedures, automation algorithms etc), but these are not the inherent value themselves. They add value, help to minimise loss and enhance performance when they are applied and the subject of conversations. We benefit most when they are brought to life through engagement between people who are making decisions based on them (and adapting them) for new uncertain situations. When this happens, everyone involved learns and we continuously develop (and transfer) our individual and collective knowledge. That is, it knowledge is co-created in situ and transferred to everyone on an ongoing basis (AND in good organisations implicit components of it are included into the relevant documents evolve them and support future decisions).

The reality is most newcomers do not read a document when faced with something new. They ask the person most likely to have the most relevant experience. If knowledge co-creation conversations have been happening, several people will know. If we JUST capture explicit insights from the past, the person who had the knowledge may have just left or no one knows who they are and the newby will not find the insights in a document anyway.

As KMers, our most complex challenge is we live in a world of this AND that (not this OR that), but we only get a budget for this or that.  I discuss this in more detail in KNOWledge SUCCESSion (sending off the manuscript to Business Expert Press tomorrow). Let me know if you would like an extract in advance of this piece. 

Capture at the end is treating a symptom of a common disease. This is akin to asking someone on their dying bed to visit the gym to make the healthy again. We work best when continuously working, walking and talking together to remain healthy and sustainable for a vibrant (and wonderfully unpredictable) future.

We don’t yet know what we need to know, but we will be equipped to co-create a range of good options (just ahead of) when we need to. This is the very heart of doing great Knowledge Leadership (to supplement our knowledge management) and why we are passionate about the contributions we make together.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Intelligent Answers

Founder: The Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Author: The Organizational Zoo & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader

New Book due out 2016: KNOWledge SUCCESSion

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, 18 August 2016 1:15 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

While doing Knowledge transfer (KT) when an employee leaves ensures that their knowledge is captured, isn't it a reactive approach? It is also a difficult situation to do KT since employees may not be motivated to share their knowledge. Shouldn't organizations go for a proactive approach where they identify the critical knowledge that the organization needs to know and capture the same from its employees. Once a Knowledge dictionary is created on the different sets of critical knowledge that a organization needs to safe guard, the same can be captured through the different knowledge capturing techniques. 

 

This approach has got two benefits. One benefit is that they get better quality knowledge and the employee sharing the knowledge will also be under the obligation to share. The second benefit is that KT will be managed in a much better way. When an employee exits organization will be clear what they might lose and accordingly plan the KT (if required).

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   

Nancy

 

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey

 

 

 

 


Jeffrey Keefer <jeffrey.keefer@...>
 

These are helpful suggestions, Nancy, and useful to reinforce that there are not single ways for engaging in the knowledge transfer process and how valuable alternates to “What are your projects? When are they do? Where are they located? etc.” that some of us may have experienced.

I included some of these elements into the tool I am drafting.

Great seeing you here, too!

[wqdqwd]
Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.
Director of Training and Knowledge Management
The Trust for Public Land
Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

666 Broadway, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10012
Office: 212-574-6882
Cell: 917-837-2788

www.tpl.org<http://www.tpl.org/>
jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org<mailto:jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org>

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, August 17, 2016 11:47 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool


Wow, if my life had more organization and time, this would be a great thread to summarize. Recently I've been working with communities of and surrounding people with developmental disabilities and there is a process called Person Centered Planning (http://rtc.umn.edu/docs/pcpmanual1.pdf) that uses a technique that I think lends itself to the existing knowledge worker, just a bit in reverse. Key to the process is the literal visualization of someone's dreams for themselves. For a departing K working that might be all the history stories she or he most values. The stories are told not one on one, but in a community setting where not only the person who is creating their plan speaks, but all those around her or him. Imagine this with a departing coworker. Not only a great way to visualize and connect to the departing knowledge, but to acknowledge the presence and gifts of that person. (examples: http://www.apbs.org/new_apbs/images/community-agencies-img7.jpg http://www.jackiedearden.co.uk/graphics/normal/SOL+PATH-1.jpg )

Then, afterwards, the visual artifact - while it certainly does not capture all explicit nor implicit knowledge, maps key ideas to the person and the knowlege. Things are somehow more accessible.

This visualized approach shows up in things like the business model canvas and the many variants that have emerged. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Business_Model_Canvas http://www.businessmodelgeneration.com/canvas/bmc and others

Just a little visual thought triggered from the mind map suggestion!

N


On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 8:14 AM, 'Randhir R.P' randhir.rp@gmail.com<mailto:randhir.rp@gmail.com> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

While doing Knowledge transfer (KT) when an employee leaves ensures that their knowledge is captured, isn't it a reactive approach? It is also a difficult situation to do KT since employees may not be motivated to share their knowledge. Shouldn't organizations go for a proactive approach where they identify the critical knowledge that the organization needs to know and capture the same from its employees. Once a Knowledge dictionary is created on the different sets of critical knowledge that a organization needs to safe guard, the same can be captured through the different knowledge capturing techniques.

This approach has got two benefits. One benefit is that they get better quality knowledge and the employee sharing the knowledge will also be under the obligation to share. The second benefit is that KT will be managed in a much better way. When an employee exits organization will be clear what they might lose and accordingly plan the KT (if required).

Regards

Randhir

On Wed, Aug 17, 2016 at 12:38 AM, Nancy Dixon nancydixon@commonknowledge.org<mailto:nancydixon@commonknowledge.org> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit. Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts. Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered.

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert, 1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert - we learn when we teach!.

I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE
Nancy

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org<mailto:jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1. There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2. What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

[wqdqwd]
Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.
Director of Training and Knowledge Management
The Trust for Public Land
Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

666 Broadway, 9th Floor
New York, NY 10012
Office: 212-574-6882<tel:212-574-6882>
Cell: 917-837-2788<tel:917-837-2788>

www.tpl.org<http://www.tpl.org/>
jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org<mailto:jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org>

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool


Hi Jeffrey,

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing.

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT.

Regards

Randhir

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org<mailto:jeffrey.keefer@tpl.org> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.
Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

Thank you.

Jeffrey


Jeffrey Keefer <jeffrey.keefer@...>
 

These are helpful suggestions, Nancy, and I also incorporated some of the ideas into the language I used in my tool. The See-Do-Teach has many great implications for knowledge transfer, especially if the person who will be responsible for continuing the work is available to be a part of the process.

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 3:08 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

This is an important question and others have provided some very useful ideas. I would like to add to the discussion the issue of  type of knowledge that the organization is trying to transfer; e.g. explicit, implicit, or tacit.  Explicit knowledge can be captured by a well designed form which includes, among other topics, both responsibilities and critical contracts.  Implicit knowledge can be transferred by many of the methods already suggested. It is also helpful when conducting an interview with the leaving person, to have 1 or 2 of the possible replacements there to ask questions that the interviewer may not have considered. 

 

For tacit knowledge, there is need to have the replacement engage in a three part process that would occur over several weeks where the replacement is actively engaged in problem solving along with the expert,  1) observe the expert and then the two sit down together to reflect on the actions of the expert, several times; 2) to be observed by the expert as the replacement attempts to take similar actions and to again reflect together, several times; and 3) for the replacement to teach another, that is to become the expert  - we learn when we teach!. 

 

 I have written about the process to transfer tacit knowledge  at http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2015/01/transferring-expertise-the-best-way-to-move-tacit-knowledge.html  I have also have a video that briefly describes the same process https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VR4PGLwAjZE   

Nancy

 

On Tue, Aug 16, 2016 at 8:49 AM, Jeffrey Keefer jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Thank you, Randhir. Yes, I believe enough different examples were shared that I was able to draft a process and steps for this work that may work in our situation. Two of the valuable take-aways for me include:

1.   There is not a single, magic bullet for doing this, and as such a shared method for Knowledge Transfer (when a staff member exits an organization) does not appear to exist. This is both helpful (I am not doing it “wrong,” as there does not appear to be a documented “right” way for doing this) and challenging (I like to work within a community of practice, so prefer to learn from people who have had far more experience than I have in navigating these steps).

2.   What works in some environments (such as technical corporate structures) and functional groups (such as IT or high-tech positions) does not immediately or naturally translate to others (such as nonprofits or intrinsic, non-technical knowledge work).

 

I developed a draft document for this and submitted it to my workgroup last night for review and feedback.

 

Since then, another person doing somewhat unique work has also announced he will be leaving, so will have a quick time to get this in shape and pilot, probably starting later this week.

 

Many thanks again to our group here for all the help. Fantastic community of professionals and colleagues whose willingness to share is unmatched in many of my other groups!

 

  

Jeffrey Keefer, Ph.D.

Director of Training and Knowledge Management

The Trust for Public Land

Creating Parks and Protecting Land for People

 

666 Broadway, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10012

Office: 212-574-6882

Cell: 917-837-2788

 

www.tpl.org

jeffrey.keefer@...

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 6:06 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Knowledge Transfer Tool

 

 

Hi Jeffrey,

 

Hope you got the information you were looking for. Regarding Knowledge transfer I suggest taking a proactive approach. Normally we think of Knowledge transfer when a key resource is moving out. Instead of that I propose an approach that is more proactive. This is something I have been asking the teams I work with to do.

 

Project teams should have a knowledge dictionary and they should keep reviewing it when anyone leaves the organization. The knowledge dictionary should map all the knowledge that is required in a project team. It should map the form in which the knowledge is present (documents or with employees). Once this is created, it will be easier for us to show to companies, what they know, what they should be knowing. 

 

When an employee leaves, we will have a better idea about what that employee knows and the extent to which we should request the employee to do KT. 

 

Regards

 

Randhir

 

On Fri, Jul 15, 2016 at 12:58 AM, jeffrey.keefer@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was asked to develop and use a knowledge transfer tool for a retiring senior staff member who has a lot of specialized knowledge we need to capture before he leaves (and before his replacement gets hired). This is similar to some knowledge audit work I am doing, though I think it requires more of a checklist that will then lead to conversations or at least prework to conversations we will then need to have about all of this.

Does anybody have a standard tool for this that I can borrow as a template and then adapt?

 

Thank you.

 

Jeffrey