Gartner on KM #state-of-KM


Daan Boom
 

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 

Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.


 Daan


 
Edited

Whenever this topic comes back up, I like to share this meme.
https://sikm.groups.io/g/main/photo/137830/1639451/meme_KM.jpg

 

Bill

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 19:38
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Gartner on KM

 

 

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 

 

Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.

 

 

 Daan

 


Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Dan - thanks for sharing - I wasn’t able to open this link.

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com

On 20 Apr 2017, at 7:38 AM, Daan Boom daanboom@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 


Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.


 Daan



Frank Guerino
 

Hi Daan,

I don’t know if the underlying message of this video is what many people in the KM community really want to hear.  Specifically, the message in Mr. Manusama's presentation is that AI, Machine Learning, and Data are the future of KM because KM will be an advanced “Digital" experience.  His message highlights a very important topic that many in KM who are not technical hate to admit, which is that: "The future of KM is Information Technology (IT), which already dominates the KM industry, today, and will only do so even more, in the future.”  So, yes, Gartner did remove KM from their chart a number of years ago but now they’re making it clear that the future of KM is an IT play.

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 7:38 PM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Gartner on KM

 

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 


Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.


 Daan


Daan Boom
 

On 20 Apr 2017, at 09:06, Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

[Attachment(s) from Patrick Lambe included below]

Hi Dan - thanks for sharing - I wasn’t able to open this link.


Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



twitter: @plambesg


Daan Boom
 

Hi Frank:

Gartner specically emphasizes in the presentation that KM is not about technology alone but forms a lesser, but integral part, of people and process. Technology is also becoming more and more ingrained in what we do on a day2day basis so technology can not be excluded from what we do. The bigger part of KM is how to make the knowledge sharing connection between people and how to design organizations or networks effectively so that available knowledge is used and learning takes place. The problem is that KM does not have a real home: The KM subject, shaped academically by philosophist but put on the business agenda by economists, followed by social social and mathematics/information scientist. Like so many subjects, KM is a multidiscplenary endeavour where all 3 disciplines have to act together to make it work. 

Daan


On 20 Apr 2017, at 20:20, Frank Guerino frank.guerino@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


Hi Daan,

I don’t know if the underlying message of this video is what many people in the KM community really want to hear.  Specifically, the message in Mr. Manusama's presentation is that AI, Machine Learning, and Data are the future of KM because KM will be an advanced “Digital" experience.  His message highlights a very important topic that many in KM who are not technical hate to admit, which is that: "The future of KM is Information Technology (IT), which already dominates the KM industry, today, and will only do so even more, in the future.”  So, yes, Gartner did remove KM from their chart a number of years ago but now they’re making it clear that the future of KM is an IT play.

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 7:38 PM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Gartner on KM

 

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 


Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.


 Daan




Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi Daan,

Thanks for posting the link. Having scanned thru the presentation, I largely agree with the presenter.

- AI is having a big impact in the contact cent-, er, sorry omni-channel environment. eGain is a software vendor focused on contact centers / omni-channel (competing with the likes of Verint). And Brian Manusama's background is in contact centers and CRM. In this environment, KM has a very specific focus - which explains some of the emphasis in the talk e.g. customer self-service, virtual intelligence agents, natural language processing, etc. A fair bit of it can be generalised to other contexts but it is important to acknowledge the background.
- About a year ago I was working in this space and the interest in AI was not just showing up in vendor presentations but also customer RFPs. What was also clear from the RFPs was that customers did not necessarily understand the technologies that they were asking about nor appreciate some of the complexities of implementing them well. I would note that Manusama's presentation calls out "exaggerated technology claims" as something to watch out for. I would also suggest people check where machine learning is positioned on Gartner's latest technology hype cycle.
- I'd also note that Manusama proposes a blended human-technology approach rather than 100% machine learning.

I think anyone involved in knowledge or information management should be across the capabilities, opportunities and limitations of AI and ML (and if you want play around with k-mean algorithms then go right ahead). I am less convinced that all organisational knowledge issues reduce to machine learning technical problems solvable with our current technology just yet and therefore we can throw out everything that we've learned from sociology, psychology, and cognitive science about human performance but I don't foresee a debate on that topic playing out in a constructive manner so I will leave it at that.

Regards,


Matt

On Friday, 21 April 2017, 8:45, "Daan Boom daanboom@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

Sorry to read that the link I shared didnt work: Herewith the full link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkAGhOpUFKc&_cldee=ZnJhbmsuemVyb3NwYWNlQHBsYW5ldC5ubA%3d%3d&recipientid=lead-ab3eadaa206ce41193c3a45d36fc0f48-e6f23e82a79a4dfcbd5a186c15b2f5d3&esid=bc5f20d0-c524-e711-8114-e0071b6ac161


Frank Guerino
 

Hi Matt,

Yes, I agree that the hype around AI and ML are very high, just like around Big Data, Digital Transformation, IT Transformation, and all the other “big things” that marketeers think up.  This supports the recommendation that there must always be a tempered blend of, both, humans and technologies when applying such evolving solutions.  This may not be the case for highly mature technologies that can simply be “turned on” and expected to work but it definitely is the case for anything that is less mature.

Creating such a "tempered blend” highlights what I believe to be a very important issue in KM.  It means that even the person designing such a blend must clearly understand the technologies (what they can and cannot do) in order to apply them toward the solving of real business problems.  The only other options is that he/she must pay someone who does understand them.  We are evolving into a space where, more and more, there will be no such things as business solutions that don’t require a clear understanding of IT and its uses.

Would you agree or disagree with this?

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)


From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Friday, April 21, 2017 at 1:25 AM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Broken Link on Next Generation KM from Gartner

 

Hi Daan,

Thanks for posting the link. Having scanned thru the presentation, I largely agree with the presenter.

- AI is having a big impact in the contact cent-, er, sorry omni-channel environment. eGain is a software vendor focused on contact centers / omni-channel (competing with the likes of Verint). And Brian Manusama's background is in contact centers and CRM. In this environment, KM has a very specific focus - which explains some of the emphasis in the talk e.g. customer self-service, virtual intelligence agents, natural language processing, etc. A fair bit of it can be generalised to other contexts but it is important to acknowledge the background.
- About a year ago I was working in this space and the interest in AI was not just showing up in vendor presentations but also customer RFPs. What was also clear from the RFPs was that customers did not necessarily understand the technologies that they were asking about nor appreciate some of the complexities of implementing them well. I would note that Manusama's presentation calls out "exaggerated technology claims" as something to watch out for. I would also suggest people check where machine learning is positioned on Gartner's latest technology hype cycle.
- I'd also note that Manusama proposes a blended human-technology approach rather than 100% machine learning.

I think anyone involved in knowledge or information management should be across the capabilities, opportunities and limitations of AI and ML (and if you want play around with k-mean algorithms then go right ahead). I am less convinced that all organisational knowledge issues reduce to machine learning technical problems solvable with our current technology just yet and therefore we can throw out everything that we've learned from sociology, psychology, and cognitive science about human performance but I don't foresee a debate on that topic playing out in a constructive manner so I will leave it at that.

Regards,

Matt


Frank Guerino
 

Hi Daan,

Yes, Mr. Manusama does make the statement that KM is not about technology alone and I agree with this statement.  We all must consider, though, that in the cases of products that revolve around AI, ML, etc., which are evolving to dominate most people’s daily lives, the People (skills), Processes, and Tools that will be required to produce them are those of IT.  People without those skills will have very little influence or input into the KM solutions that are AI related, especially when the interfaces to such solutions are also being dominated by technologies (mobile, wearable devices, etc.).

The part of all this that will not be IT related will continue to be the human who is the consumer of such products.  What he/she uses such solutions for or what he/she derives from such solutions will always be the human side of KM.

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 8:25 PM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Gartner on KM

 

Hi Frank:

Gartner specically emphasizes in the presentation that KM is not about technology alone but forms a lesser, but integral part, of people and process. Technology is also becoming more and more ingrained in what we do on a day2day basis so technology can not be excluded from what we do. The bigger part of KM is how to make the knowledge sharing connection between people and how to design organizations or networks effectively so that available knowledge is used and learning takes place. The problem is that KM does not have a real home: The KM subject, shaped academically by philosophist but put on the business agenda by economists, followed by social social and mathematics/information scientist. Like so many subjects, KM is a multidiscplenary endeavour where all 3 disciplines have to act together to make it work. 

Daan


 

Nice one.

______
Best regards,
Deependra Tandukar
http://deependra.tandukar.net
-----
A 'TEAM' is not a group of people who work together, rather it's a group of people who 'TRUST' each other.

On Apr 20, 2017 5:23 AM, "Daan Boom daanboom@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Following earlier articles that KM is dead, herewith an inspring Gartner presentation by Brian Manusama stressing the opposite. Gartner removed KM from its chart a few years ago so its good to see that they put back in their attention scheme. 


Gartner: Next-gen knowledge management to succeed in the digital age.


 Daan


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Frank,

I agree and disagree.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Apr 22, 2017, at 12:52 AM, Frank Guerino frank.guerino@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matt,

Yes, I agree that the hype around AI and ML are very high, just like around Big Data, Digital Transformation, IT Transformation, and all the other “big things” that marketeers think up.  This supports the recommendation that there must always be a tempered blend of, both, humans and technologies when applying such evolving solutions.  This may not be the case for highly mature technologies that can simply be “turned on” and expected to work but it definitely is the case for anything that is less mature.

Creating such a "tempered blend” highlights what I believe to be a very important issue in KM.  It means that even the person designing such a blend must clearly understand the technologies (what they can and cannot do) in order to apply them toward the solving of real business problems.  The only other options is that he/she must pay someone who does understand them.  We are evolving into a space where, more and more, there will be no such things as business solutions that don’t require a clear understanding of IT and its uses.

Would you agree or disagree with this?

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)


From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Friday, April 21, 2017 at 1:25 AM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Broken Link on Next Generation KM from Gartner

 

Hi Daan,

Thanks for posting the link. Having scanned thru the presentation, I largely agree with the presenter.

- AI is having a big impact in the contact cent-, er, sorry omni-channel environment. eGain is a software vendor focused on contact centers / omni-channel (competing with the likes of Verint). And Brian Manusama's background is in contact centers and CRM. In this environment, KM has a very specific focus - which explains some of the emphasis in the talk e.g. customer self-service, virtual intelligence agents, natural language processing, etc. A fair bit of it can be generalised to other contexts but it is important to acknowledge the background.
- About a year ago I was working in this space and the interest in AI was not just showing up in vendor presentations but also customer RFPs. What was also clear from the RFPs was that customers did not necessarily understand the technologies that they were asking about nor appreciate some of the complexities of implementing them well. I would note that Manusama's presentation calls out "exaggerated technology claims" as something to watch out for. I would also suggest people check where machine learning is positioned on Gartner's latest technology hype cycle.
- I'd also note that Manusama proposes a blended human-technology approach rather than 100% machine learning.

I think anyone involved in knowledge or information management should be across the capabilities, opportunities and limitations of AI and ML (and if you want play around with k-mean algorithms then go right ahead). I am less convinced that all organisational knowledge issues reduce to machine learning technical problems solvable with our current technology just yet and therefore we can throw out everything that we've learned from sociology, psychology, and cognitive science about human performance but I don't foresee a debate on that topic playing out in a constructive manner so I will leave it at that.

Regards,

Matt
On Friday, 21 April 2017, 8:45, "Daan Boom daanboom@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

Sorry to read that the link I shared didnt work: Herewith the full link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkAGhOpUFKc&_cldee=ZnJhbmsuemVyb3NwYWNlQHBsYW5ldC5ubA%3d%3d&recipientid=lead-ab3eadaa206ce41193c3a45d36fc0f48-e6f23e82a79a4dfcbd5a186c15b2f5d3&esid=bc5f20d0-c524-e711-8114-e0071b6ac161




Paul McDowall
 

Gartner has virtually always taken an IT-centric lens to explore and explain the future of business so it's no surprise that they are prognosticating AI's return.  AI is a Phoenix that could not be achieved through earlier technology but is now much more possible (in the future) than ever before.   We know the Gartner Hype cycle and we know the real adoption track record of new better-than-sliced-bread technologies.  Heavily IT-related industries and companies might look to AI in the future.  We don't see much of that as yet, only in very unique situations.  Over the years we've all seen videos of the 'future' state of mankind with the prospect of fabulous technologies.  IT plays a huge role in today's society in much of the world although the recent HBR article shows that increased technology use isn't always a good thing (https://hbr.org/2017/04/a-new-more-rigorous-study-confirms-the-more-you-use-facebook-the-worse-you-feel), and many people are turning away from it to re-gain some measure of peace in their life.
     
I'm an old IT guy and the problem with IT is, us, it's how we think about technology as opposed to how we think about society and mankind and what's really important.  IT is only one narrow perspective on the future state of mankind.  Look at the news and you'll get a truer sense of the state of mankind.  One of the greatest needs in the world is for sustainable power/energy. Food and clean water are huge needs in the world.  Poverty and economic decline are huge issues of concern for mankind.  Decent health care and epidemic control are huge needs.  Good education is a huge need in the world.  Human knowledge has existed as long has mankind has existed and knowledge sharing has existed as long as mankind has existed, and knowledge collection has existed as long as mankind has existed, and....   Human suffering has existed as long as mankind has existed and AI is not going to help with that in any concrete way that we can clearly see. Better Knowledge Management and collaboration is desperately needed around the world to improve the state of mankind, more than improving some off-shore call centre somewhere with AI tools. 

Through the IT-looking glass, AI is still a sparkling promise for the future of some businesses.  Let's keep things in perspective can we?   AI is certainly not KM.  At best AI is just the tail of the elephant, and does true KM a real disservice to label it that. 


Frank Guerino
 

Hi Paul,

While I agree with most of what you’re saying (especially your statements on AI adoption and value), I would just like to point out that HBR’s article is about personal social technology use and not about personal productivity use or business technology use, which are very different things.  Business adoption of technology is constantly going up.

A serious question for you to consider: You mentioned problem spaces such as Energy, Food, Water, Health Care, Poverty, etc.  Do you believe any single one of them can be solved without IT at its backbone?  Before you answer the question, consider that the research labs and businesses for each and every one of the domain/topic spaces you mentioned are all heavily dependent on and dominated by IT.

My Best,

Frank
Frank Guerino, Managing Partner
The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, April 22, 2017 at 9:28 AM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Gartner on KM

 

Gartner has virtually always taken an IT-centric lens to explore and explain the future of business so it's no surprise that they are prognosticating AI's return.  AI is a Phoenix that could not be achieved through earlier technology but is now much more possible (in the future) than ever before.   We know the Gartner Hype cycle and we know the real adoption track record of new better-than-sliced-bread technologies.  Heavily IT-related industries and companies might look to AI in the future.  We don't see much of that as yet, only in very unique situations.  Over the years we've all seen videos of the 'future' state of mankind with the prospect of fabulous technologies.  IT plays a huge role in today's society in much of the world although the recent HBR article shows that increased technology use isn't always a good thing (https://hbr.org/2017/04/a-new-more-rigorous-study-confirms-the-more-you-use-facebook-the-worse-you-feel), and many people are turning away from it to re-gain some measure of peace in their life.

     
I'm an old IT guy and the problem with IT is, us, it's how we think about technology as opposed to how we think about society and mankind and what's really important.  IT is only one narrow perspective on the future state of mankind.  Look at the news and you'll get a truer sense of the state of mankind.  One of the greatest needs in the world is for sustainable power/energy. Food and clean water are huge needs in the world.  Poverty and economic decline are huge issues of concern for mankind.  Decent health care and epidemic control are huge needs.  Good education is a huge need in the world.  Human knowledge has existed as long has mankind has existed and knowledge sharing has existed as long as mankind has existed, and knowledge collection has existed as long as mankind has existed, and....   Human suffering has existed as long as mankind has existed and AI is not going to help with that in any concrete way that we can clearly see. Better Knowledge Management and collaboration is desperately needed around the world to improve the state of mankind, more than improving some off-shore call centre somewhere with AI tools. 

Through the IT-looking glass, AI is still a sparkling promise for the future of some businesses.  Let's keep things in perspective can we?   AI is certainly not KM.  At best AI is just the tail of the elephant, and does true KM a real disservice to label it that.