Benchmarking against the industry #standards #strategy #maturity


Ann Haibach
 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

Thanks,
Ann Haibach


 

Hi Ann

 

Glad to share my practice based version of a maturity framework. It is one of many frameworks that exist.  Please follow up with me if you have any specific questions.  Hope you find it useful.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2018 12:20
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach


Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Ann

If you check this list’s archives over the past 2-3 weeks there has been a lively discussion around the draft ISO KM standard - in particular there’s a post by Boris Jaeger describing the historical background to standards work in KM with some useful links.

I recently conducted a study of maturity frameworks and some of the issues they have to contend with - you’ll find the white paper linked at 

Best wishes

Patrick

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com

On 24 Jan 2018, at 5:19 PM, ann.haibach@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 


We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

Thanks,
Ann Haibach



Stan Garfield
 

Here are two articles with links to maturity models:

Regards,
Stan


Arthur Shelley
 

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

 

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

 

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

 

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all  those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach


Chris Collison
 

Hi Ann,

I’ve attached the model from Learning to Fly (thanks for the evergreen comment Arthur – as I approach 50, I need all the reassurance I can get!)

 

I’d absolutely endorse what Arthur said about starting with the basics and developing your own. You’ll get buy-in, recognised tone/language – and it’s fun!  

Here are some suggested steps for a 3-hour workshop:

 

  1. Arrange a workshop for a good cross-section interested parties (volunteers rather than conscripts). To develop the content in a model, I’d suggest groups of 3-5 at tables, so aiming for 9+ people in the workshop to allow for efficient use of time.

  2. Discuss the level at which the model will be used – Team?  Department?  Office?  Country? 
    Agree what level 5 and level 1 mean.  I counsel groups to avoid negative language for low levels (‘foundation’ or ‘basic’ rather than ‘underperforming’) to reduce “fear of ‘fessing-up” when the model is used.

  3. Agree upon the practices (the topics/columns of a model).  There are several ways to do this.  Anecdote circles work well as an engaging, emergent approach.  Appreciative inquiry or drawing pictures of a ‘what good looks like’ vision following by a discussion about common themes.  I tend to use other maturity models as a check, providing them to tables once the ideas are flowing rather than an input at the start, to avoid ‘leading the witness’. You’ll need to check with the group that the practices are discrete, and at a similar level of granularity.
    Aim for somewhere between 5 and 15 practices to have a model which is usable. I encourage groups to describe them with an active verb if possible (e.g. Mobilizing Learning or Connecting People – rather than Lessons Learned or Communities) – my attached one could be better in this regard.

 

  1. Once the practices are established (that’s the hard bit!). I then prepare a large space on a wall to make a super-size model, and write the titles of each practice on an A4 sheet and stick them up, allowing space for 5 levels below each one.

 

  1. Ask each table group to choose a practice, and remove it from the wall.  In their group, ask them to think about the factors which influence that practice (some people call these the ‘variables’) and to use these to build some descriptions for levels 1, 3 and 5, using 1 landscape-format A4 sheet for each. (You can extrapolate for levels 2 and 4 later).   As soon as they have completed their three levels, get them to stick the heading and the descriptions on the wall – and then those their next practice to work on.  After 1-2 hours, you should have a life-sized maturity model on the wall.  I wouldn't expect a table-group to work-up content for more than 4 practices – it can be fairly intense.

 

  1. When the first version of the model is up on the wall, encourage groups to add comments (via post-its) to the output from the other tables.  Discuss anything which is contentious together.

 

  1. Finally, give the model a test-run with the group.  Get the participants to conduct an assessment of a team/department they know, and use dots or post-its to record the scores. This will give you a sense as to whether the hurdle is too high or low.
    I use blue and green post-its or markers to generate a ‘river diagram’ in real time, and illustrate the potential for benchlearning.

 

  1. You can fine-tune the model and normalise the language after the workshop and feed it back – avoid large-group wordsmithing.

 

Don’t stop at developing a Maturity model for KM though - that would be like buying SharePoint just for your KM Team to use!   This whole process is a KM tool in its own right, and can be used to codify and mobilize knowledge for any topic – and then to curate content and support communities.

 

Hope this helps.  There’s a lot more detail on the design and facilitated use of self-assessment tool (aka maturity models) for any business topic in: ‘No More Consultants – We know more than we think.’ On Amazon.

 

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "'Arthur' arthur@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Thursday, 25 January 2018 at 05:47
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

 

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

 

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

 

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all  those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach


Patrick Lambe
 

I love the workshop design. I absolutely agree that the best use of such a model is to determine meanings and markers for the organisation against its context and goals, not against abstract industry standards, and the "process is more important than the product” approach.

The other consideration is that such models need to change with the times, as needs and expectations change (and the organisation learns more about itself).

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com

On 25 Jan 2018, at 10:26 AM, Chris Collison chris.collison@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


Hi Ann,

I’ve attached the model from Learning to Fly (thanks for the evergreen comment Arthur – as I approach 50, I need all the reassurance I can get!)

 

I’d absolutely endorse what Arthur said about starting with the basics and developing your own. You’ll get buy-in, recognised tone/language – and it’s fun!  

Here are some suggested steps for a 3-hour workshop:

 

  1. Arrange a workshop for a good cross-section interested parties (volunteers rather than conscripts). To develop the content in a model, I’d suggest groups of 3-5 at tables, so aiming for 9+ people in the workshop to allow for efficient use of time.

  2. Discuss the level at which the model will be used – Team?  Department?  Office?  Country?  
    Agree what level 5 and level 1 mean.  I counsel groups to avoid negative language for low levels (‘foundation’ or ‘basic’ rather than ‘underperforming’) to reduce “fear of ‘fessing-up” when the model is used.

  3. Agree upon the practices (the topics/columns of a model).  There are several ways to do this.  Anecdote circles work well as an engaging, emergent approach.  Appreciative inquiry or drawing pictures of a ‘what good looks like’ vision following by a discussion about common themes.  I tend to use other maturity models as a check, providing them to tables once the ideas are flowing rather than an input at the start, to avoid ‘leading the witness’. You’ll need to check with the group that the practices are discrete, and at a similar level of granularity.
    Aim for somewhere between 5 and 15 practices to have a model which is usable. I encourage groups to describe them with an active verb if possible (e.g. Mobilizing Learning or Connecting People – rather than Lessons Learned or Communities) – my attached one could be better in this regard.

 

  1. Once the practices are established (that’s the hard bit!). I then prepare a large space on a wall to make a super-size model, and write the titles of each practice on an A4 sheet and stick them up, allowing space for 5 levels below each one.

 

  1. Ask each table group to choose a practice, and remove it from the wall.  In their group, ask them to think about the factors which influence that practice (some people call these the ‘variables’) and to use these to build some descriptions for levels 1, 3 and 5, using 1 landscape-format A4 sheet for each. (You can extrapolate for levels 2 and 4 later).   As soon as they have completed their three levels, get them to stick the heading and the descriptions on the wall – and then those their next practice to work on.  After 1-2 hours, you should have a life-sized maturity model on the wall.  I wouldn't expect a table-group to work-up content for more than 4 practices – it can be fairly intense. 

 

  1. When the first version of the model is up on the wall, encourage groups to add comments (via post-its) to the output from the other tables.  Discuss anything which is contentious together.

 

  1. Finally, give the model a test-run with the group.  Get the participants to conduct an assessment of a team/department they know, and use dots or post-its to record the scores. This will give you a sense as to whether the hurdle is too high or low.
    I use blue and green post-its or markers to generate a ‘river diagram’ in real time, and illustrate the potential for benchlearning.

 

  1. You can fine-tune the model and normalise the language after the workshop and feed it back – avoid large-group wordsmithing.

 

Don’t stop at developing a Maturity model for KM though - that would be like buying SharePoint just for your KM Team to use!   This whole process is a KM tool in its own right, and can be used to codify and mobilize knowledge for any topic – and then to curate content and support communities.

 

Hope this helps.  There’s a lot more detail on the design and facilitated use of self-assessment tool (aka maturity models) for any business topic in: ‘No More Consultants – We know more than we think.’ On Amazon.

 

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "'Arthur' arthur@...[sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Thursday, 25 January 2018 at 05:47
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

  

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

 

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

 

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

 

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all  those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com 

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

<image001.png>

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] 
Sent: Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach




Stephen Bounds
 

Most maturity models are problematic because of their domain assumptions, but I find KM maturity models to be particularly prone to inheriting the biases and views of the author.

So I also endorse the idea of a custom maturity model. However, I generally call these "roadmaps", the idea being that you're signposting the road to success through incremental change rather than indicating objective "maturity".

I don't know if any of the available 'standard' KM models are suitable for benchmarking to be honest. The Singapore KRO is probably the closest. An alternative you might consider is evaluation against the K-CORE model of 4 knowledge capabilities and 12 knowledge variables <https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20141130101909-42674299-4-popular-mistakes-knowledge-managers-make>.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@cordelta.com
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 25/01/2018 9:36 PM, Patrick Lambe plambe@greenchameleon.com [sikmleaders] wrote:

I love the workshop design. I absolutely agree that the best use of such a model is to determine meanings and markers for the organisation against its context and goals, not against abstract industry standards, and the "process is more important than the product” approach.


The other consideration is that such models need to change with the times, as needs and expectations change (and the organisation learns more about itself).

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
+65 62210383



website: www..straitsknowledge.com <http://www.straitsknowledge.com>
weblog: www.greenchameleon.com <http://www.greenchameleon.com>
twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com <http://www.aithinsoftware.com>

On 25 Jan 2018, at 10:26 AM, Chris Collison chris.collison@outlook.com <mailto:chris.collison@outlook.com> [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


Hi Ann,

I’ve attached the model from Learning to Fly (thanks for the evergreen comment Arthur – as I approach 50, I need all the reassurance I can get!)

I’d absolutely endorse what Arthur said about starting with the basics and developing your own. You’ll get buy-in, recognised tone/language – and it’s fun!

Here are some suggested steps for a 3-hour workshop:

1. Arrange a workshop for a good cross-section interested parties
(volunteers rather than conscripts). To develop the content in a
model, I’d suggest groups of 3-5 at tables, so aiming for 9+
people in the workshop to allow for efficient use of time.

2. Discuss the level at which the model will be used – Team? 
Department?  Office? Country?
Agree what level 5 and level 1 mean. I counsel groups to avoid
negative language for low levels (‘foundation’ or ‘basic’ rather
than ‘underperforming’) to reduce “fear of ‘fessing-up” when the
model is used..

3. Agree upon the practices (the topics/columns of a model).  There
are several ways to do this.  Anecdote circles work well as an
engaging, emergent approach.  Appreciative inquiry or drawing
pictures of a ‘what good looks like’ vision following by a
discussion about common themes.  I tend to use other maturity
models as a check, providing them to tables once the ideas are
flowing rather than an input at the start, to avoid ‘leading the
witness’. You’ll need to check with the group that the practices
are discrete, and at a similar level of granularity.
Aim for somewhere between 5 and 15 practices to have a model
which is usable. I encourage groups to describe them with an
active verb if possible (e.g. Mobilizing Learning or Connecting
People – rather than Lessons Learned or Communities) – my
attached one could be better in this regard.

4. Once the practices are established (that’s the hard bit!). I then
prepare a large space on a wall to make a super-size model, and
write the titles of each practice on an A4 sheet and stick them
up, allowing space for 5 levels below each one.

5. Ask each table group to choose a practice, and remove it from the
wall.  In their group, ask them to think about the factors which
influence that practice (some people call these the ‘variables’)
and to use these to build some descriptions for levels 1, 3 and
5, using 1 landscape-format A4 sheet for each. (You can
extrapolate for levels 2 and 4 later).   As soon as they have
completed their three levels, get them to stick the heading and
the descriptions on the wall – and then those their next practice
to work on.  After 1-2 hours, you should have a life-sized
maturity model on the wall.  I wouldn't expect a table-group to
work-up content for more than 4 practices – it can be fairly intense.

6. When the first version of the model is up on the wall, encourage
groups to add comments (via post-its) to the output from the
other tables.  Discuss anything which is contentious together.

7. Finally, give the model a test-run with the group.  Get the
participants to conduct an assessment of a team/department they
know, and use dots or post-its to record the scores. This will
give you a sense as to whether the hurdle is too high or low.
I use blue and green post-its or markers to generate a ‘river
diagram <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ai7LcCzOJo8>’ in real
time, and illustrate the potential for benchlearning.

8. You can fine-tune the model and normalise the language after the
workshop and feed it back – avoid large-group wordsmithing.

/Don’t stop at developing a Maturity model for KM though - that would be like buying SharePoint just for your KM Team to use!   This whole process is a KM tool in its own right, and can be used to codify and mobilize knowledge for any topic – and then to curate content and support communities./

Hope this helps.  There’s a lot more detail on the design and facilitated use of self-assessment tool (aka maturity models) for any business topic in: ‘No More Consultants – We know more than we think.’ On Amazon.

Chris

*From:*<sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups..com>> on behalf of "'Arthur'arthur@organizationalzoo.com <mailto:arthur@organizationalzoo.com>[sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
*Reply-To:*"sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
*Date:*Thursday, 25 January 2018 at 05:47
*To:*"sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>" <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>>
*Subject:*RE: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D <https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn..exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D>

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

Regards

*/Arthur Shelley/*

*Producer:**Creative Melbourne <http://www.creativemelbourne.com.au/>*

*Author:**KNOW/ledge/SUCCESS/ion/ <http://www.businessexpertpress.com/books/knowledge-succession-sustained-capability-growth-through-strategic-projects>*//Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

*Earlier Books:*The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

*Principal:*www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au <http://www..intelligentanswers.com.au/>

*Founder:*Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/ambassadors/>

*Mb.*+61 413 047 408 *Skype:*Arthur.Shelley *Twitter:*@Metaphorage

*LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168*

*Free behavioural profiles:*www.organizationalzoo.com <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/>

*Blog:*www.organizationalzoo.com/blog <http://www.organizationalzoo.com/blog>

<image001.png> <http://www.creativemelbourne.com.au/cm18/>

*From:*sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]
*Sent:*Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
*To:*sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com <mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com>
*Subject:*[sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable?

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

Thanks,

Ann Haibach


<KM_SelfAssessment.pdf>


Howie Cohen
 

In 2014, I went into the insurance industry cold.  I had a book bag full of models and frameworks some (most) from this group.   I found the maturity models very effective in the DoD and core US Federal application. I could use the models in the same discussion thread as DODAF / FEAF enterprise architecture discussions / planning etc.   I also used models in discussions / examples in some of the commercial work but these were more strategic references.  In practical application the models had to convert to some roadmap but again this was more strategic.   Going into a complex environment with a practical and measurable approach required extensive modification and customization of any models I had.  KM maturity in a large organization (like insurance) has to be designed, customized and built for purpose in that organization.   Sourcing knowledge from this group and leveraging the combined expertise will make it much easier but there isn't a one size fits all.  This also applies across insurance.  The industry is changing in so many ways and companies are doing things dramatically different from each other.  If you look at something like Lemonade which seeks 80+% full automation vs AIG or other large co that has massive KT requirements etc.  This doesn't even get into the differences in the multiple views on rapid service knowledge / managed services etc vs core insurance knowledge or practice knowledge in underwriting or claims.  I personally found that everyday I was going to school and partnering with other KM teams.   Even indicators of organizational health from expense / market cap etc are vastly different.  Insurance companies are looked via the combined ratio as opposed to other market indicators.    

Hope this helps! 
--Howie 

On Thu, Jan 25, 2018 at 8:03 AM, Stephen Bounds km@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Most maturity models are problematic because of their domain assumptions, but I find KM maturity models to be particularly prone to inheriting the biases and views of the author.

So I also endorse the idea of a custom maturity model. However, I generally call these "roadmaps", the idea being that you're signposting the road to success through incremental change rather than indicating objective "maturity".

I don't know if any of the available 'standard' KM models are suitable for benchmarking to be honest. The Singapore KRO is probably the closest. An alternative you might consider is evaluation against the K-CORE model of 4 knowledge capabilities and 12 knowledge variables.

Cheers,
-- Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 25/01/2018 9:36 PM, Patrick Lambe plambe@... [sikmleaders] wrote:
 

I love the workshop design. I absolutely agree that the best use of such a model is to determine meanings and markers for the organisation against its context and goals, not against abstract industry standards, and the "process is more important than the product” approach.


The other consideration is that such models need to change with the times, as needs and expectations change (and the organisation learns more about itself).

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner



twitter: @plambesg

Knowledge mapping made easy: www.aithinsoftware.com

On 25 Jan 2018, at 10:26 AM, Chris Collison chris.collison@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:


Hi Ann,

I’ve attached the model from Learning to Fly (thanks for the evergreen comment Arthur – as I approach 50, I need all the reassurance I can get!)

 

I’d absolutely endorse what Arthur said about starting with the basics and developing your own. You’ll get buy-in, recognised tone/language – and it’s fun!  

Here are some suggested steps for a 3-hour workshop:

 

  1. Arrange a workshop for a good cross-section interested parties (volunteers rather than conscripts). To develop the content in a model, I’d suggest groups of 3-5 at tables, so aiming for 9+ people in the workshop to allow for efficient use of time.

  2. Discuss the level at which the model will be used – Team?  Department?  Office?  Country?  
    Agree what level 5 and level 1 mean.  I counsel groups to avoid negative language for low levels (‘foundation’ or ‘basic’ rather than ‘underperforming’) to reduce “fear of ‘fessing-up” when the model is used..

  3. Agree upon the practices (the topics/columns of a model).  There are several ways to do this.  Anecdote circles work well as an engaging, emergent approach.  Appreciative inquiry or drawing pictures of a ‘what good looks like’ vision following by a discussion about common themes.  I tend to use other maturity models as a check, providing them to tables once the ideas are flowing rather than an input at the start, to avoid ‘leading the witness’. You’ll need to check with the group that the practices are discrete, and at a similar level of granularity.
    Aim for somewhere between 5 and 15 practices to have a model which is usable. I encourage groups to describe them with an active verb if possible (e.g. Mobilizing Learning or Connecting People – rather than Lessons Learned or Communities) – my attached one could be better in this regard.

 

  1. Once the practices are established (that’s the hard bit!). I then prepare a large space on a wall to make a super-size model, and write the titles of each practice on an A4 sheet and stick them up, allowing space for 5 levels below each one.

 

  1. Ask each table group to choose a practice, and remove it from the wall.  In their group, ask them to think about the factors which influence that practice (some people call these the ‘variables’) and to use these to build some descriptions for levels 1, 3 and 5, using 1 landscape-format A4 sheet for each. (You can extrapolate for levels 2 and 4 later).   As soon as they have completed their three levels, get them to stick the heading and the descriptions on the wall – and then those their next practice to work on.  After 1-2 hours, you should have a life-sized maturity model on the wall.  I wouldn't expect a table-group to work-up content for more than 4 practices – it can be fairly intense. 

 

  1. When the first version of the model is up on the wall, encourage groups to add comments (via post-its) to the output from the other tables.  Discuss anything which is contentious together.

 

  1. Finally, give the model a test-run with the group.  Get the participants to conduct an assessment of a team/department they know, and use dots or post-its to record the scores. This will give you a sense as to whether the hurdle is too high or low.
    I use blue and green post-its or markers to generate a ‘river diagram’ in real time, and illustrate the potential for benchlearning.

 

  1. You can fine-tune the model and normalise the language after the workshop and feed it back – avoid large-group wordsmithing.

 

Don’t stop at developing a Maturity model for KM though - that would be like buying SharePoint just for your KM Team to use!   This whole process is a KM tool in its own right, and can be used to codify and mobilize knowledge for any topic – and then to curate content and support communities.

 

Hope this helps.  There’s a lot more detail on the design and facilitated use of self-assessment tool (aka maturity models) for any business topic in: ‘No More Consultants – We know more than we think.’ On Amazon.

 

Chris

 

 

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of "'Arthur' arthur@organizationalzoo.com[sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com" <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Thursday, 25 January 2018 at 05:47
To: "sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com" <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

  

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

 

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

 

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

 

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all  those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com 

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] 
Sent: Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach






 

Thanks Arthur for the kind words.  Agree with Chris completely—KM always needs to be context relevant. 

 

I have learned to approach the development of KM strategy and implementation by first understanding what the as-is KM environment is (KME)  and consider this understanding in the context of the organization’s business and operational environment (BOE), then working with the client organization to determine where they want to go with KM (to-be KME), what outcomes they want and why, from their investment of time and resources in these desired KM outcomes.  Benchmarking is useful, and can be valuable, but “cloning” is not.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2018 00:48
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

Hi Ann,

Yes the  debate has been great about the ISO KM standards. In addition to the ever helpful Patrick, Matt and Bill, this forum, KM4Dev and ActKM forum have all had good dialogues about KM Maturity models over the years. Chros Collison’s model from Learning to Fly is evergreen as it is simple to use n workshops and makes many very practical points gto stumilatte dialogue.

 

The Knowledge Management society of Singapore have a developmental “award” called KRO (Knowledge Ready Organization - a process to mentor organisation through the journey you are undertaking rather than a “competition”). It has as its base 10 questions across 6 criteria (Leadership, Strategy, Culture, Process, Technology and Impact).

 

There are many models and most are useful if they are used as a stimulant for constructive conversation and development planning and offer a way to assess progress over time. Some are quite simple and others quite complex, start with basics and develop your own based on your organisational needs and direction.

 

There are several useful insights in the special edition of JEMI Patrick convened/edited in 2014 here:

https://doaj.org/toc/2299-7326?source=%7B%22query%22%3A%7B%22filtered%22%3A%7B%22filter%22%3A%7B%22bool%22%3A%7B%22must%22%3A%5B%7B%22range%22%3A%7B%22index.date%22%3A%7B%22lt%22%3A%221420070400000%22%2C%22gte%22%3A%221388534400000%22%7D%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22index.issn.exact%22%3A%222299-7326%22%7D%7D%2C%7B%22term%22%3A%7B%22_type%22%3A%22article%22%7D%7D%5D%7D%7D%2C%22query%22%3A%7B%22match_all%22%3A%7B%7D%7D%7D%7D%2C%22from%22%3A0%2C%22size%22%3A100%7D

Enjoy your learning and capability development journey through knowledge. I am certain it will deliver benefits for all  those who actively participate and foe the stakeholders they serve.

 

Regards

Arthur Shelley

Producer: Creative Melbourne

Author: KNOWledge SUCCESSion  Sustained performance and capability growth through knowledge projects

Earlier Books: The Organizational Zoo (2007) & Being a Successful Knowledge Leader (2009)

Principal: www.IntelligentAnswers.com.au 

Founder: Organizational Zoo Ambassadors Network

Mb. +61 413 047 408  Skype: Arthur.Shelley  Twitter: @Metaphorage

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=4229168

Free behavioural profiles: www.organizationalzoo.com

Blog: www.organizationalzoo.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Thursday, 25 January 2018 4:20 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Benchmarking against the industry

 

 

I'm looking for information on industry standards and maturity assessments for Knowledge Management.  What do you use to benchmark your KM efforts against the KM industry overall? Is there a KM maturity assessment that you find valuable? 

 

We're just over a year into our KM program here, and I'd appreciate any help on this topic that you can offer.

 

Thanks,

Ann Haibach


Aaron Buchsbaum
 

Patrick --- thanks for your link to http://www.greenchameleon.com/gc/blog_detail/developing_a_km_maturity_assessment_that_supports_action_planning. I very much enjoyed the high-level contrast between progressive maturity vs. the “phase shift” idea you attributed to Milton. Makes sense from where I sit.  Cheers --- Aaron


Boris Jaeger
 

Dear Ann,
 
as for the ISO KM standard discussion I very much liked the contributions from Murray (here in this group) or Brad (in the KM4Dev dgroup, https://dgroups.org/groups/km4dev-l, http://www.km4dev.org)...
 
When we talk about evergreen KM maturity models you should take a look at the models developed by Siemens (http://www.kmmm.org), Tata, or InfoSys (https://sites.google.com/site/thekmbible/home/maturity-model)
 
You may also want to check out APQC's KM Capability Assessment Tool, based on their KM Maturity model.
 
 

Before you do a workshop on this issue you should definitely do some further research on this issue (check for more of such models, analyse the pros and cons of such models, etc.).
 
A Model of Organizational Knowledge Management Maturity based on People, Process, and Technology
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.207.4296&rep=rep1&type=pdf
 
 
 
Knowledge Management Maturity Models: A Systemic Comparison
https://doi.org/10.1109/ICIII.2011.420
 
The danger of maturity models in KM (and the alternative)
http://www.nickmilton.com/2011/07/danger-of-maturity-models-in-km-and.html
 
...
 

A good starter to digg deeper into KM maturity models are definitely the compilations provided by Stan Garfield.

Have a relaxing weekend,
Boris Jaeger - "Curiosity is the beginning of all learning!"

CONTACT
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ACHIEVEMENTS
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Ann Haibach
 

Thank you, thank you, everyone, for your helpful and insightful responses to my question.  Please keep your feedback coming.  

Thank you, too, to Stan for telling me about this useful group at KMWorld.