Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management #culture #trust


Robert L. Bogue
 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Rob,

Like you, I strongly believe that trust forms the basis for success in Knowledge Management.

I use the 5 dimensions of trust identified by Mika Vanhala to undertake an analytical approach of where trust exists or is lacking in any organisational system. These are visualised in the diagram below:

Doing this assessment provides a tangible discussion for the basis of KM improvement. Sometimes this means operational or structural improvements, sometimes it is about better communications of things already being done. Either way trust can provide a guide to prioritisation as well as being a KPI to strive for.

Slides from a recent masterclass I gave on the issue are here: https://www.slideshare.net/bounds/why-trust-is-vital-to-success-with-knowledge-management

Happy to chat more if it resonates.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 28/04/2018 11:39 AM, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] wrote:

Friends

Ive been pondering a problem and Id love folks thoughts on it. I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organizations culture but in my observation theres rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture. (including budget and staffing)

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization. I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier. I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication. Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy. From a tools perspective, I believe that theres an opportunity to leverage affinity groups to start the idea of sharing. Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organizations work. Theyre designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories but Im really interested in what you believe.

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM or the factors that influence it?

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310 M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog



John Hovell
 

Hi Robert,

 

Much appreciated question, thanks for asking. Similar to you, I’ll be interested to read thoughts from other KMers as well.

 

If I jump straight to “an answer”, here’s what comes to mind first for me - https://sites.google.com/site/stangarfield/SAFARIS.png

 

But that said, can you say more about what you mean by ‘culture’? I read budget, staffing, trust, and communication. The “answer” above comes from a perspective of “specific actions for a knowledge sharing culture”.

 

I’ve found it helpful to think of ‘culture’ as either ‘behavior change’ or ‘group dynamics’. When thinking of it as behavior change, then it becomes an effort of listening/observing/awareness of current behaviors and then group discussions about desired-future-behaviors. There’s an old adage that says something to the effect of “a company’s culture is defined as the worst accepted behaviors by the leadership”. That’s quite a dire perspective, so then another helpful perspective has been to re-frame ‘culture’ as ‘group dynamics’. Then, KM can partner with other disciplines (such as Organization Development, Diversity & Inclusion, Innovation, Process Improvement, Design Thinking, Project Management, Change Management, etc.) to “boldly reveal the system to itself” and “support self-organization”.

 

At risk of writing an email that is too long, I’ll offer one more adage that might help, its known as the change paradox, “real change begins when you become who you are, as opposed to who you want to be”, (which I think is complex and true for an individual and any group size) if that makes sense?

 

Am I reading the question correctly? Is this helpful?

 

Thanks,

John

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...]
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 9:40 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Chris Collison
 

Hi Robert,

It’s a great problem to ponder!

 

A few years ago, I wrote an article (attached) entitled ‘The seven deadly syndromes of knowledge sharing’ which described some caricatures of cultural barriers which I had encountered.  It’s a light-hearted piece, but I have found it quite helpful with clients as a prompt to get start them thinking about articulating and diagnosing some of their own syndromes – and then planning cultural interventions which can help to gradually address them.

 

Hope it’s helpful for you.

Kind regards,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable Ltd.

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, 28 April 2018 at 03:10
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Chris Collison
 

Hmm. Not sure whether the ‘Seven Deadly Syndromes’ attachment made it through, so I have uploaded it manually to the group.

Link here: https://bit.ly/2r5Rt24

 

Cheers,

Chris

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Chris Collison chris.collison@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, 28 April 2018 at 15:33
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management [1 Attachment]

 

 

[Attachment(s) from Chris Collison included below]

Hi Robert,

It’s a great problem to ponder!

A few years ago, I wrote an article (attached) entitled ‘The seven deadly syndromes of knowledge sharing’ which described some caricatures of cultural barriers which I had encountered.  It’s a light-hearted piece, but I have found it quite helpful with clients as a prompt to get start them thinking about articulating and diagnosing some of their own syndromes – and then planning cultural interventions which can help to gradually address them.

Hope it’s helpful for you.

Kind regards,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable Ltd.

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, 28 April 2018 at 03:10
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Stan Garfield
 


Nancy Dixon
 

Rob,
Like others I have written about this in blog posts. Here is one that seems to be downloaded a lot. http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2009/03/five-actions-organizations-can-take-to-increase-knowledge-sharing.html   But beyond those practices I think it is a bit of a chicken and egg situation. I have seen that when organizations put KM practices in place, like Communities, AARs, Peer Assists, the culture itself starts to change. The act of seeing people helping each other creates a feeling of  reciprocity - someone helped me so I will help someone else - pay it forward. Maybe Dan Ranta will come in on this thread. But I remember when Dan started the great communities at Conoco, he did so by collecting stories about how employees and teams had been helping each other - that was happening, of course, before KM was started. John McQuary   at Fluor did much the same thing by “advertising” the sharing that was going on - Posters telling those stories in office hallways, on the web site, having a contest for the best story, executives repeating the stories. I’m not sure we need to wait for the “chicken” to think that a knowledge sharing culture is there; maybe we should just go look for the “eggs”. I think there is knowledge sharing happening in every organization between caring people that don’t ever talk about it. Both Dan and John got it to grow by pointing to it.

Nancy


 

Hi Robert,
Indeed culture and work practice behaviors are fundamental to KM projects.

My work over the past few years has been focused on helping organizations adapt and adopt digital environments (enterprise social networks, collaboration tools, modern intranets) to bring the benefits of connection and community of the external web within the organization.

And in truth the "internal vs external" model in the digital age is a diminishing paradigm.   Holistic digital marketing efforts by companies seek to bring "employees" into social network-based conversations with customers and prospects and to broaden brand impact.

Having said that, it is remarkable to me that individuals who are quite adept at being active in external social networks (linking, activating, connecting, sharing), turn off those behaviors when they come to work.

I used basic tactics around adoption and engagement, but I look to expand capabilities for individuals using concepts like Personal Knowledge Mastery and Working Out Loud, as well as active convening, facilitating and stewarding communities.    Here's a couple of links for you on talks or writings that expand on this thought.

I find there's often a few big issues on large-scale KM initiatives
1)   Leaders view it as something that their workforce has to adapt to, not them - therefore they don't look upon it as a culture change that they have to lead.
2)   There's not enough up-front attention paid to the business imperatives for the initiative (especially if it involved large scale technology rollout), so the change program under-performs
3)   Often viewed as a layering on of technology, rather than a move towards profound changes in approaches to the way people work, collaborate, share knowledge, take active ownership of their own networks, etc.

I think about how to address some of these issues  - here's a few items that might be of help/interest.

Enterprise Social Networks and the Digital Workplace

Communities for Change

Something's on overload, but it's not collaboration


And here's a great McKinsey podcast with Satya Nadella on culture change


Catherine


Social Collaboration and Digital Transformation
Silicon Valley, USA
+1-650-704-3889

Contributor to Smarter Innovation (chapter abstracts) (Ark Group, 2014)
Blog: www.collaboration-incontext.com


On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 7:33 AM, Chris Collison chris.collison@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Chris Collison included below]

Hi Robert,

It’s a great problem to ponder!

 

A few years ago, I wrote an article (attached) entitled ‘The seven deadly syndromes of knowledge sharing’ which described some caricatures of cultural barriers which I had encountered.  It’s a light-hearted piece, but I have found it quite helpful with clients as a prompt to get start them thinking about articulating and diagnosing some of their own syndromes – and then planning cultural interventions which can help to gradually address them.

 

Hope it’s helpful for you.

Kind regards,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable Ltd.

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, 28 April 2018 at 03:10
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 



T J Elliott
 

One of the cultural barriers that can exist is the tendency by top leadership to diminish or even deride opportunitirs for reflection. Without reflection, generating new knowledge or revising existing knowledge becomes much more difficult. If 'the way we do things around here' is to always criticize any attempts to reflect as 'paralysis by analysis' and to fail to consider the possibility that this approach actually may be leading to 'extinction by intuition', then the stickiness of existing knowledge is intensified.

Of course, the opposite circumstances can also obtain and leadership encourage dialogue. Starbucks closing all stores on May 29 might be such an example of encouraging reflection that builds new actionable knowledge.

Leadership is not the only force within a culture that can restrict the opportunity to reflect. I've always been partial to the work of Charles Perrow about orders of control. The structure of the organization, its rules and forms and other bureaucratic devices, also order the days in such a way that might make any true reflection impossible. Consider the standing agendas of regularly scheduled meetings that often run back to back. Is there any time available to ask whether we need to revise our theories of action based upon recent results?

Thank you for such an interesting question

All the best,
T.J.

"All systems resist change, complex systems resist change in complex ways."
T.J. Elliott


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Rob,


Like you, I strongly believe that trust forms the basis for success in Knowledge Management.

I use the 5 dimensions of trust identified by Mika Vanhala to undertake an analytical approach of where trust exists or is lacking in any organisational system. These are visualised in the attached diagram.


Doing this assessment provides a tangible discussion for the basis of KM improvement. Sometimes this means operational or structural improvements, sometimes it is about better communications of things already way trust can provide a guide to prioritisation as well as being a KPI to strive for.


Slides from a recent masterclass I gave on the issue are here: https://www.slideshare.net/bounds/why-trust-is-vital-to-success-with-knowledge-management


Hope this provides food for thought.


Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================


Tammy Bearden
 

Stirring question, Rob. Culture is boss, it totally sets the norm and cadence of an organization. Those who rock the boat, even if in the strategic best interest of the org., need tough skin. 

One huge barrier I have seen is: success in the way things have always been done, or complacency. Another is the effort to apply the rigor to purposeful, disciplined knowledge sharing and capture. And of course getting limited budget relative to ROI is always hard, especially if KM is incongruent with risk-averse financiers/c-suite. Need to continuously secure buy-in by using KM principles and tactics to help others be successful (WIIFM.)

Defining organizational decision-making very clearly will afford opportunities for KM growth/success. What’s the decision to be made and who is the decision maker? Consensus is important, but the decision maker can take in all input then decide. 

Another opportunity is with Storytelling...share success stories that envelop KM principles and touch points. Carefully tell of failures that could have been avoided with more KM rigor. And always promote/celebrate failures as learning opportunities and iterations on a future success.

Eager to read others’ thoughts on cultural barriers to KM success! 
 
Tammy


On Apr 27, 2018, at 8:39 PM, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Robert L. Bogue
 

Stephen –

 

Thanks.  I believe trust is foundational in life.  I really enjoyed Trust: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order My review is at https://www.thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/02/27/book-review-trust-human-nature-reconstitution-social-order/   

 

I tend to view trust a bit differently than it appears you do.  I tend to think in terms of competence, contractual, and communication trust.  (There’s more on this in my post Trust=>Vulnerability=>Intimacy available at https://www.thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2013/10/21/trust-vulnerability-intimacy/)

 

As the question is evolving through the responses, I’m wondering if trust isn’t one of the root conditions which enable KM.

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2018 10:06 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Hi Rob,

 

Like you, I strongly believe that trust forms the basis for success in Knowledge Management.

I use the 5 dimensions of trust identified by Mika Vanhala to undertake an analytical approach of where trust exists or is lacking in any organisational system. These are visualised in the attached diagram.

 

Doing this assessment provides a tangible discussion for the basis of KM improvement. Sometimes this means operational or structural improvements, sometimes it is about better communications of things already way trust can provide a guide to prioritisation as well as being a KPI to strive for.

 

Slides from a recent masterclass I gave on the issue are here: https://www.slideshare.net/bounds/why-trust-is-vital-to-success-with-knowledge-management

 

Hope this provides food for thought.

 

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================


Robert L. Bogue
 

Tammy –

 

Thanks.  I agree story telling is an important skill for the change agent / KM practitioner to have.  They need to be able to get folks to buy in.

 

I don’t know that I agree that we need to build consensus on every decision.  When looking at conflict models, it seems that driving to consensus is too expensive to do all the time.  I think that the real art is knowing when consensus is necessary/appropriate.

 

I agree with the barriers – except that I take a more nuanced view of KM and sharing.  There are places where you need to make it in-line and a part of the process.  (Policies/Procedures for instance) and other places that where for me you need to be targeting relationships and emergence.

 

As for culture, for me it’s not the boss.  It’s the momentum.  Culture is the result of people and policies.  Without effort for change they’ll continue as they are.  I don’t like thinking of culture as it’s own entity (or person) because I find that people don’t know how to make small changes that have a big impact.

 

Please feel free to push back on my perceptions – and thank you for responding.  I appreciate understanding your perspective.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2018 12:16 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Stirring question, Rob. Culture is boss, it totally sets the norm and cadence of an organization. Those who rock the boat, even if in the strategic best interest of the org., need tough skin. 

 

One huge barrier I have seen is: success in the way things have always been done, or complacency. Another is the effort to apply the rigor to purposeful, disciplined knowledge sharing and capture. And of course getting limited budget relative to ROI is always hard, especially if KM is incongruent with risk-averse financiers/c-suite. Need to continuously secure buy-in by using KM principles and tactics to help others be successful (WIIFM.)

 

Defining organizational decision-making very clearly will afford opportunities for KM growth/success. What’s the decision to be made and who is the decision maker? Consensus is important, but the decision maker can take in all input then decide. 

 

Another opportunity is with Storytelling...share success stories that envelop KM principles and touch points. Carefully tell of failures that could have been avoided with more KM rigor. And always promote/celebrate failures as learning opportunities and iterations on a future success.

 

Eager to read others’ thoughts on cultural barriers to KM success! 

 

Tammy

 


On Apr 27, 2018, at 8:39 PM, Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 


Robert L. Bogue
 

TJ –

 

I love the idea that there needs to be capacity for reflection.  I really frame that into long-term focus availability.  That is they’re not so focused on making quarterly earnings – or in smaller businesses payroll.  They’ve got the capacity in terms of mental effort, timing, resources, etc., to try to figure out how to transform the organization into something better.

 

As others commented, apathy is the other end.  There’s got to be the right amount of creative tension happening to help drive the organization forward without driving it apart.

 

Thanks!

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 8:29 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

One of the cultural barriers that can exist is the tendency by top leadership to diminish or even deride opportunitirs for reflection. Without reflection, generating new knowledge or revising existing knowledge becomes much more difficult. If 'the way we do things around here' is to always criticize any attempts to reflect as 'paralysis by analysis' and to fail to consider the possibility that this approach actually may be leading to 'extinction by intuition', then the stickiness of existing knowledge is intensified.

Of course, the opposite circumstances can also obtain and leadership encourage dialogue. Starbucks closing all stores on May 29 might be such an example of encouraging reflection that builds new actionable knowledge.

Leadership is not the only force within a culture that can restrict the opportunity to reflect. I've always been partial to the work of Charles Perrow about orders of control. The structure of the organization, its rules and forms and other bureaucratic devices, also order the days in such a way that might make any true reflection impossible. Consider the standing agendas of regularly scheduled meetings that often run back to back. Is there any time available to ask whether we need to revise our theories of action based upon recent results?

Thank you for such an interesting question

All the best,
T.J.

"All systems resist change, complex systems resist change in complex ways."
T.J. Elliott


Robert L. Bogue
 

Nancy –

 

I think that there’s a set of skills that practitioners need – story telling is definitely on the list.  I also think there are a set of conditions in the organization that either encourage or discourage KM.  I think they’re probably the same ones that encourage collaboration – but I’m not 100% sure on that yet.  (I’m thinking through whether Hackman’s criteria and conditions map to KM.  My review of his Collaborative Intelligence is at https://www.thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2014/05/03/book-review-collaborative-intelligence-using-teams-to-solve-hard-problems/ -- and it summarizes his perspective.)

 

I do also agree that virtuous cycles will feed the system once you get the feedback loops setup correctly.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 4:22 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Re: Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Rob,

Like others I have written about this in blog posts. Here is one that seems to be downloaded a lot. http://www.nancydixonblog.com/2009/03/five-actions-organizations-can-take-to-increase-knowledge-sharing.html   But beyond those practices I think it is a bit of a chicken and egg situation. I have seen that when organizations put KM practices in place, like Communities, AARs, Peer Assists, the culture itself starts to change. The act of seeing people helping each other creates a feeling of  reciprocity - someone helped me so I will help someone else - pay it forward. Maybe Dan Ranta will come in on this thread. But I remember when Dan started the great communities at Conoco, he did so by collecting stories about how employees and teams had been helping each other - that was happening, of course, before KM was started. John McQuary   at Fluor did much the same thing by “advertising” the sharing that was going on - Posters telling those stories in office hallways, on the web site, having a contest for the best story, executives repeating the stories. I’m not sure we need to wait for the “chicken” to think that a knowledge sharing culture is there; maybe we should just go look for the “eggs”. I think there is knowledge sharing happening in every organization between caring people that don’t ever talk about it. Both Dan and John got it to grow by pointing to it.

 

Nancy



On Apr 28, 2018, at 10:10 AM, stangarfield@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

Rob, thanks for your post.  Here is what I have written about culture, trust, and communications.

1.       How Can You Nurture a Knowledge-Sharing Culture?

2.      Knowledge-Sharing Culture and Values

3.      50 Categories for Assessing Organizational Culture

4.      KM, culture and compromise

5.      The importance of trust in knowledge sharing

6.      Knowledge Management Communications


Regards,
Stan

 

 


Robert L. Bogue
 

Catherine –

 

I can’t agree more about the problem with people looking at projects like they’re technology projects rather than cultural change projects.  I often tell people that most technology projects are actually organizational change programs in disguise.  The problem with that is that if I ask a room full of 100 IT professionals if they’ve been trained on organizational change, only one in three times will I get anyone raise their hand.  In half of those I get told it was an introductory level class.  Certainly not solid training on how to do organizational change in an organization.

 

I further agree that when leaders think that whatever the initiative is doesn’t apply to them … it’s a clear marker about the lack of health in the organization.  The best leaders I know want to do what everyone else is doing so that they understand.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 5:13 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Hi Robert,

Indeed culture and work practice behaviors are fundamental to KM projects.

My work over the past few years has been focused on helping organizations adapt and adopt digital environments (enterprise social networks, collaboration tools, modern intranets) to bring the benefits of connection and community of the external web within the organization.

And in truth the "internal vs external" model in the digital age is a diminishing paradigm.   Holistic digital marketing efforts by companies seek to bring "employees" into social network-based conversations with customers and prospects and to broaden brand impact.

Having said that, it is remarkable to me that individuals who are quite adept at being active in external social networks (linking, activating, connecting, sharing), turn off those behaviors when they come to work.

I used basic tactics around adoption and engagement, but I look to expand capabilities for individuals using concepts like Personal Knowledge Mastery and Working Out Loud, as well as active convening, facilitating and stewarding communities.    Here's a couple of links for you on talks or writings that expand on this thought.

I find there's often a few big issues on large-scale KM initiatives

1)   Leaders view it as something that their workforce has to adapt to, not them - therefore they don't look upon it as a culture change that they have to lead.

2)   There's not enough up-front attention paid to the business imperatives for the initiative (especially if it involved large scale technology rollout), so the change program under-performs

3)   Often viewed as a layering on of technology, rather than a move towards profound changes in approaches to the way people work, collaborate, share knowledge, take active ownership of their own networks, etc.

I think about how to address some of these issues  - here's a few items that might be of help/interest.

 

Enterprise Social Networks and the Digital Workplace

Communities for Change

Something's on overload, but it's not collaboration

And here's a great McKinsey podcast with Satya Nadella on culture change

Catherine


Social Collaboration and Digital Transformation

Silicon Valley, USA

+1-650-704-3889

Contributor to Smarter Innovation (chapter abstracts) (Ark Group, 2014)
Blog: www.collaboration-incontext.com

 

 

On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 7:33 AM, Chris Collison chris.collison@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

[Attachment(s) from Chris Collison included below]

Hi Robert,

It’s a great problem to ponder!

 

A few years ago, I wrote an article (attached) entitled ‘The seven deadly syndromes of knowledge sharing’ which described some caricatures of cultural barriers which I had encountered.  It’s a light-hearted piece, but I have found it quite helpful with clients as a prompt to get start them thinking about articulating and diagnosing some of their own syndromes – and then planning cultural interventions which can help to gradually address them.

 

Hope it’s helpful for you.

Kind regards,

Chris

 

Knowledgeable Ltd.

 

 

 

From: <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of "Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]" <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Saturday, 28 April 2018 at 03:10
To: "sikmleaders@..." <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

I published a list of 12 critical success factors for KM in the 2000's (and am currently doing research to re-verify them) they are:

A Knowledge Strategy that identifies users, sources, processes, storage strategy, knowl­edge and links to knowledge for the KMS;
Motivation and Commitment of users including incentives and training; 
Integrated Technical Infrastructure in­cluding networks, databases/repositories, computers, software, KMS experts;
An organizational culture and structure that supports learning and the sharing and use of knowledge;
A common enterprise wide knowledge structure that is clearly articulated and easily understood;
Senior Management support including allocation of resources, leadership, and providing training;
A Learning Organization;
There is a clear goal and purpose for the KMS;
Measures are established to assess the im­pacts of the KMS and the use of knowledge as well as verifying that the right knowledge is being captured;
The search, retrieval, and visualization functions of the KMS support easy knowl­edge use;
Work processes are designed that incorporate knowledge capture and use; 
Security/protection of knowledge.



-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]
To: sikmleaders
Sent: Fri, Apr 27, 2018 7:10 pm
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management



Friends –
 
I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)
 
I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.
 
To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.
 
Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.
 
Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?
 
Rob
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
 



Murray Jennex
 

I don't mention trust in the list because trust is a fundamental requirement for knowledge sharing (as pointed out by many of you).

An interesting study I published two years ago (and working on a more complete article on this now) are statistically validated measures of KM success (done after KM has been implemented).  This study found four major constructs: leadership, impact on business, km strategy impact, and knowledge content use/impact.  While culture is not mentioned in an after the fact measurement of success it is a required precursor, plus I would argue that leadership incorporates org culture issues.  I will also say that the four groups of measures I mention here did not constitute the full range of measures, i.e. they explained about 70% of the measures.  This leaves a lot of room for additional measures and I can see trust as both a precursor for KM and a measure of KM success just as leadership is (perhaps trust is a part of the leadership measure, or is embedded in all four success measure groups).  Thanks...murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Murray Jennex murphjen@... [sikmleaders] To: sikmleaders
Sent: Mon, Apr 30, 2018 12:39 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management



I published a list of 12 critical success factors for KM in the 2000's (and am currently doing research to re-verify them) they are:

A Knowledge Strategy that identifies users, sources, processes, storage strategy, knowl­edge and links to knowledge for the KMS;
Motivation and Commitment of users including incentives and training; 
Integrated Technical Infrastructure in­cluding networks, databases/repositories, computers, software, KMS experts;
An organizational culture and structure that supports learning and the sharing and use of knowledge;
A common enterprise wide knowledge structure that is clearly articulated and easily understood;
Senior Management support including allocation of resources, leadership, and providing training;
A Learning Organization;
There is a clear goal and purpose for the KMS;
Measures are established to assess the im­pacts of the KMS and the use of knowledge as well as verifying that the right knowledge is being captured;
The search, retrieval, and visualization functions of the KMS support easy knowl­edge use;
Work processes are designed that incorporate knowledge capture and use; 
Security/protection of knowledge.



-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 27, 2018 7:10 pm
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management



Friends –
 
I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)
 
I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.
 
To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.
 
Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.
 
Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?
 
Rob
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects..com/blog
 





Robert L. Bogue
 

Murray –

 

Thanks.  Some of the 12 feel a bit squishy.  I don’t know how I’d write metrics around them.

 

I am curious though, do you exclude from your definition of KM anything that’s got a formal process around it?  Say, policies and procedures.  They could contain a wealth of context specific knowledge – or not – depending upon the way the organization manages them.  Do you put that inside or outside the KM bucket?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2018 3:53 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

 

I don't mention trust in the list because trust is a fundamental requirement for knowledge sharing (as pointed out by many of you).

 

An interesting study I published two years ago (and working on a more complete article on this now) are statistically validated measures of KM success (done after KM has been implemented).  This study found four major constructs: leadership, impact on business, km strategy impact, and knowledge content use/impact.  While culture is not mentioned in an after the fact measurement of success it is a required precursor, plus I would argue that leadership incorporates org culture issues.  I will also say that the four groups of measures I mention here did not constitute the full range of measures, i.e. they explained about 70% of the measures.  This leaves a lot of room for additional measures and I can see trust as both a precursor for KM and a measure of KM success just as leadership is (perhaps trust is a part of the leadership measure, or is embedded in all four success measure groups).  Thanks...murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Murray Jennex murphjen@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Mon, Apr 30, 2018 12:39 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management



I published a list of 12 critical success factors for KM in the 2000's (and am currently doing research to re-verify them) they are:

 

A Knowledge Strategy that identifies users, sources, processes, storage strategy, knowl­edge and links to knowledge for the KMS;

Motivation and Commitment of users including incentives and training; 

Integrated Technical Infrastructure in­cluding networks, databases/repositories, computers, software, KMS experts;

An organizational culture and structure that supports learning and the sharing and use of knowledge;

A common enterprise wide knowledge structure that is clearly articulated and easily understood;

Senior Management support including allocation of resources, leadership, and providing training;

A Learning Organization;

There is a clear goal and purpose for the KMS;

Measures are established to assess the im­pacts of the KMS and the use of knowledge as well as verifying that the right knowledge is being captured;

The search, retrieval, and visualization functions of the KMS support easy knowl­edge use;

Work processes are designed that incorporate knowledge capture and use; 

Security/protection of knowledge.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 27, 2018 7:10 pm
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management

 

Friends –

 

I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)

 

I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.

 

To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.

 

Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.

 

Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects..com/blog

 

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

I think any knowledge can be in KM and I don't exclude anything that has a formal process around it.  In fact, my background is the nuclear industry and we had almost everything with a formal process around it so to me that is actually easier to do than not having a formal process.  Process is captured in the critical success factors through the first CSF, A Knowledge Strategy that identifies users, sources, processes, storage strategy, knowl­edge and links to knowledge for the KMS, as in my KM success model this is expanded to include processes for maintaining/capturing/using knowledge.  In my metrics for measuring KM Success this is captured through a clearer construct, knowledge content.  I am re-working my KM success model and make it much clearer that KM strategy stays focused on aligning KM with the organization and implementing KPIs and strategic goals while Knowledge Content Management deals specifically with the processes used to identify/capture/share/store knowledge.

So to directly answer your question, its inside the KM bucket

murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders]
To: sikmleaders
Sent: Mon, Apr 30, 2018 5:28 pm
Subject: RE: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management



Murray –
 
Thanks.  Some of the 12 feel a bit squishy.  I don’t know how I’d write metrics around them.
 
I am curious though, do you exclude from your definition of KM anything that’s got a formal process around it?  Say, policies and procedures.  They could contain a wealth of context specific knowledge – or not – depending upon the way the organization manages them.  Do you put that inside or outside the KM bucket?
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
 
From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2018 3:53 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management
 
 
I don't mention trust in the list because trust is a fundamental requirement for knowledge sharing (as pointed out by many of you).
 
An interesting study I published two years ago (and working on a more complete article on this now) are statistically validated measures of KM success (done after KM has been implemented).  This study found four major constructs: leadership, impact on business, km strategy impact, and knowledge content use/impact.  While culture is not mentioned in an after the fact measurement of success it is a required precursor, plus I would argue that leadership incorporates org culture issues.  I will also say that the four groups of measures I mention here did not constitute the full range of measures, i.e. they explained about 70% of the measures.  This leaves a lot of room for additional measures and I can see trust as both a precursor for KM and a measure of KM success just as leadership is (perhaps trust is a part of the leadership measure, or is embedded in all four success measure groups).  Thanks...murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Murray Jennex murphjen@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Mon, Apr 30, 2018 12:39 pm
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management


I published a list of 12 critical success factors for KM in the 2000's (and am currently doing research to re-verify them) they are:
 
A Knowledge Strategy that identifies users, sources, processes, storage strategy, knowl­edge and links to knowledge for the KMS;
Motivation and Commitment of users including incentives and training; 
Integrated Technical Infrastructure in­cluding networks, databases/repositories, computers, software, KMS experts;
An organizational culture and structure that supports learning and the sharing and use of knowledge;
A common enterprise wide knowledge structure that is clearly articulated and easily understood;
Senior Management support including allocation of resources, leadership, and providing training;
A Learning Organization;
There is a clear goal and purpose for the KMS;
Measures are established to assess the im­pacts of the KMS and the use of knowledge as well as verifying that the right knowledge is being captured;
The search, retrieval, and visualization functions of the KMS support easy knowl­edge use;
Work processes are designed that incorporate knowledge capture and use; 
Security/protection of knowledge.
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogue rbogue@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
To: sikmleaders <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Fri, Apr 27, 2018 7:10 pm
Subject: [sikmleaders] Creating a Cultural Capacity for Knowledge Management
 
Friends –
 
I’ve been pondering a problem and I’d love folks thoughts on it.  I think that often times we speak of the KM initiative as disconnected from the organization’s culture but in my observation there’s rarely anything that has as much impact on the KM project as the corporate culture.  (including budget and staffing)
 
I was wondering what you believe are the cultural barriers and opportunities to KM projects – and what you think the tools or techniques are effective at encouraging the creation of a culture in which KM (and the organization) can thrive.
 
To provide a set of examples, I believe that one of the major factors is the degree of trust in the organization.  I believe that lack of trust is perhaps the biggest barrier.  I believe that one of the opportunities for improvement in organizations is communication.  Strangely few organizations (large or small) have a clearly articulated communication strategy.  From a tools perspective, I believe that there’s an opportunity to leverage “affinity groups” to start the idea of sharing.  Initially these groups might be entirely unrelated to the organization’s work.  They’re designed to make sharing inside the organization the new norm.
 
Obviously, there are other things that I see as items in each of these categories – but I’m really interested in what you believe.
 
Care to share your thoughts on the relationship between culture and KM – or the factors that influence it?
 
Rob
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects..com/blog