Topics

Request for feedback: ISO Knowledge Management standard and draft charter of the International Knowledge Professional Society #ISO-KM-Standard


Stan Garfield
 

The following is from Arthur Shelley.  You can read more about Arthur in my recent profile.


From: Arthur Shelley <Arthur@...>


Hello Knowledge Leaders and KM Professionals,

 

At the AuSKM conference next Wednesday we are facilitating a conversation about the opportunities and challenges that will arise by the release of the ISO Knowledge Management standard (ISO30401). You can view the standard structure here: https://www.iso.org/standard/ 68683.html

 

Although many of you can’t be here in Melbourne for that activity, your voice can still be part of it. We are interested to receive form you a statement of what you think is THE BIGGEST benefit or risk associated with the standard.


You can submit your perspective to Cath@... as a 30-60 second video, or as just a SHORT written statement (one or two sentences). You can put something on your blob, YouTube or other video library and send us the link too if you prefer.

 

Clearly there is VOLUMES of opinions flying around on the international forums, some positively excited and others quite negative. These will also be used as part of the conversations. I am interested in what YOU think as a leader or experienced practitioner. All contributions will be shared with the participants of the AuSKM conference to stimulate the diversity of perspectives in the conversation (with full acknowledgement of course).


Here is the link to the ISO standard: https://www.iso.org/standard/ 68683.html You can “View” the ISO 30401 structure (all  header sections) here, but not full content on this site. You can of course buy it there too. I know standards seem like the cost a lot, but it is less than the cost of a consultant for an hour. Personally I believe most good advice is largely free and the answers will not come from standard itself, but for the conversations it stimulates.

 

My thoughts on how ISO30401 will make a difference for many… (and how I would/do proceed as a practitioner in my own contexts). I suggest the best way forward for many people/organisations is to engage in internal dialogue around the elements of the standard - perhaps in a series of Agile facilitations about what it means for them and how it can generate value in their context. Maybe assess the level of maturity against most of the elements and reflect on what implications this has for the performance of the organisation (which can be anything from personal to teams to whole of organisation – in ANY sector).

 

The standard is a framework and a conversation starter – it highlight the key elements of a good KM program for sustained success. NO document and NO ONE person can provide all the “answers” for you. Successful initiatives will collectively engage the experiences of the experienced people in contexts relevant to them, to enable the highest priorities. These priorities are then developed into beneficial projects to be implemented (usually as aligned programs with phases as new insights emerge from the early projects). The standards topics are an excellent start to these conversations and HOW each organisation implements these will inevitably be different (which is why the standard covers WHAT and now HOW).

 

The outputs and outcomes of these dialogues is a range of possibilities. This is when you MAY benefit from engaging a strategic KM consultant. Just remember, the consultant does not (normally) know your business like your own people do. Do not engage anyone who starts by telling you how to proceed. They should be asking lots of questions to understand your perspectives and desired outcomes, connections, purpose, knowledge flows, decision-making approaches and (human and technical) knowledgebase as well as your knowledge gaps. Only then can they really help you to progress.

 

A good organisation will develop far more impactful and sustainable Knowledge initiatives by taking ownership of it internally, with a leadership sponsor and a senior “doer”. Without this leadership support and internal action, no consultant can assist. A consultant can help you with strategic advice on how to move forward once you know what is most important - but do you really need them by then? You are better off with a high quality mentor who is knowledge aware. Hope this is helpful.

 

You may also be interested to make a comment on the draft charter of the International Knowledge Professional Society which will be the topic of another interactive dialogue at AuSKM. You can comment on the developing draft here: https://docs.google.com/ document/d/16sEP5chIcHjvY- MBVgU8-JSffxwjGxBW2rPHenKAxjs/ edit?usp=sharing This society is in the process of being established to connect us as a profession and highlight the importance of KM across all  professional disciplines. You can join us here: https://www.linkedin.com/ groups/10390250



From: Cath Shelley <cath@...>


Please feel free to reply to me at cath@... with your submission.
Please remember that I will need to collate these to be shown Wednesday afternoon.
I can only include these if they are in my inbox by 8pm Tuesday.
Would love to hear as many voices as possible! 



Murray Jennex
 

for academics who aren't intending to be consultants the price is still pretty high, any academic/research discounts?


-----Original Message-----
From: stangarfield@... [sikmleaders]
To: sikmleaders
Sent: Sun, Nov 11, 2018 9:15 am
Subject: [sikmleaders] Request for feedback: ISO Knowledge Management standard and draft charter of the International Knowledge Professional Society



The following is from Arthur Shelley.  You can read more about Arthur in my recent profile.

From: Arthur Shelley <Arthur@...>

Hello Knowledge Leaders and KM Professionals,
 
At the AuSKM conference next Wednesday we are facilitating a conversation about the opportunities and challenges that will arise by the release of the ISO Knowledge Management standard (ISO30401). You can view the standard structure here: https://www.iso.org/standard/ 68683.html
 
Although many of you can’t be here in Melbourne for that activity, your voice can still be part of it. We are interested to receive form you a statement of what you think is THE BIGGEST benefit or risk associated with the standard.

You can submit your perspective to Cath@... as a 30-60 second video, or as just a SHORT written statement (one or two sentences). You can put something on your blob, YouTube or other video library and send us the link too if you prefer.
 
Clearly there is VOLUMES of opinions flying around on the international forums, some positively excited and others quite negative. These will also be used as part of the conversations. I am interested in what YOU think as a leader or experienced practitioner. All contributions will be shared with the participants of the AuSKM conference to stimulate the diversity of perspectives in the conversation (with full acknowledgement of course).

Here is the link to the ISO standard: https://www.iso.org/standard/ 68683.html You can “View” the ISO 30401 structure (all  header sections) here, but not full content on this site. You can of course buy it there too. I know standards seem like the cost a lot, but it is less than the cost of a consultant for an hour. Personally I believe most good advice is largely free and the answers will not come from standard itself, but for the conversations it stimulates.
 
My thoughts on how ISO30401 will make a difference for many… (and how I would/do proceed as a practitioner in my own contexts). I suggest the best way forward for many people/organisations is to engage in internal dialogue around the elements of the standard - perhaps in a series of Agile facilitations about what it means for them and how it can generate value in their context. Maybe assess the level of maturity against most of the elements and reflect on what implications this has for the performance of the organisation (which can be anything from personal to teams to whole of organisation – in ANY sector).
 
The standard is a framework and a conversation starter – it highlight the key elements of a good KM program for sustained success. NO document and NO ONE person can provide all the “answers” for you. Successful initiatives will collectively engage the experiences of the experienced people in contexts relevant to them, to enable the highest priorities. These priorities are then developed into beneficial projects to be implemented (usually as aligned programs with phases as new insights emerge from the early projects). The standards topics are an excellent start to these conversations and HOW each organisation implements these will inevitably be different (which is why the standard covers WHAT and now HOW).
 
The outputs and outcomes of these dialogues is a range of possibilities. This is when you MAY benefit from engaging a strategic KM consultant. Just remember, the consultant does not (normally) know your business like your own people do. Do not engage anyone who starts by telling you how to proceed. They should be asking lots of questions to understand your perspectives and desired outcomes, connections, purpose, knowledge flows, decision-making approaches and (human and technical) knowledgebase as well as your knowledge gaps. Only then can they really help you to progress.
 
A good organisation will develop far more impactful and sustainable Knowledge initiatives by taking ownership of it internally, with a leadership sponsor and a senior “doer”. Without this leadership support and internal action, no consultant can assist. A consultant can help you with strategic advice on how to move forward once you know what is most important - but do you really need them by then? You are better off with a high quality mentor who is knowledge aware. Hope this is helpful.
 
You may also be interested to make a comment on the draft charter of the International Knowledge Professional Society which will be the topic of another interactive dialogue at AuSKM. You can comment on the developing draft here: https://docs.google.com/ document/d/16sEP5chIcHjvY- MBVgU8-JSffxwjGxBW2rPHenKAxjs/ edit?usp=sharing This society is in the process of being established to connect us as a profession and highlight the importance of KM across all  professional disciplines. You can join us here: https://www.linkedin.com/ groups/10390250



From: Cath Shelley <cath@...>


Please feel free to reply to me at cath@... with your submission.
Please remember that I will need to collate these to be shown Wednesday afternoon.
I can only include these if they are in my inbox by 8pm Tuesday.
Would love to hear as many voices as possible! 




Stan Garfield
 

Murray, this comment from Kay Greig may offer an option for you:

"For those of you working for larger organizations, educational establishment or a government agency, you may have access to the full content of the ISO standard through your library."