Advice on software for knowledge sharing #tools


Jonathan Norman
 

I was recently approached by one of the Major Projects Association members looking for advice. Personally, I tend to focus far more on the people - activities, events, processes for knowledge sharing, rather than the software but let me share the query they sent me.

I'd be very grateful for any advice on this. Here is his query:

"We don’t have a corporate solution for knowledge capture and re-use.  Although we do lessons learned, the data is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums, and hence cannot be easily shared.  A high degree of the stuff captured tends to be ‘what we learnt on this problem’, rather than being what did we learn that is transferable, and what would I pass-on as my legacy, or to the next incumbent.  Likewise, when starting the next project, the data tends to have been about a specific instance and not very helpful.  It would be helpful to be able to data mine for projects of a similar nature and find relevant lessons.

 

I’m probably just looking for the art of the possible at this stage to see what software packages other organisations use and find helpful. We have SAP and Oracle P6 as our major systems so is there anything of a similar robustness?"



tman9999@...
 

A couple of things to consider.

Short’s Law #1: You cannot automate that which you don’t do well manually.
In this case, you state you don’t have a corporate solution for K capture and re-use, and your org is interested in a software solution for same. You then state that the current approach on spreadsheets is deficient in several ways. Suggestion: challenge work teams or departments to figure out how to improve K sharing and leveraging lessons learned. Make it a competition. Until you crack this one, you don’t have anything to automate. A new software solution for K sharing will just get in the way.

Short’s Law # 2: Proposed changes should be cognitively consistent and culturally compatible.
Carefully review the deployed software, processes, procedures, norms, etc. already in use. What is already present? How is it used? What additional capabilities does it have that is not being used; or is being used, but not for K sharing?
There is no “KM in a Box” solution. KM and K Sharing are a melange of tools and behaviors and processes and policies, so the way one org does it will likely be unique to that org in ways that will make it difficult to “drag and drop” into another one. Your best bet is to leverage what you are already using; the behaviors and norms that are already in place; the tool sets that employees are already familiar with. You can build on these by creatively augmenting what people are already using; and not requiring them to do something they lack the skill or knowledge to do (cognitively consistent); and by not transgressing established behavioral or cultural norms (culturally compatible).


Abdul Jaleel
 

Well, straight to the point. We have used SharePoint 2013 & 365 versions and found it useful to a greater extent. However, it depends upon several factors and one of them is your intranet platform. For us, our intranet is on SharePoint and that makes it easier for integrating with other corporate Applications/Software (HR/PM) as well. Though I have not used, Oracle and SAP do have KM modules that could be utilised if that is fitting to your requirement. On the other hand if you need to decide on a platform, just google for check-list of items to be considered for KM platform/software, you will be able to find some, if not many. I had a checklist prepared a few years ago, incase l find it l shall fwd it to you,  if you think it would be of help.

Abdul Jaleel
Kuwait


Megha Gulati
 

Hello, you can try google suite as well which gives you more features to use like developing  a site, storing data in google drive and other tools like word, excel, ppt for a corporate site. The cross-linking process between site and drive are very user friendly - which means, multiple users can access a single link with the most updated file from the backend through a site and work on it.

You can migrate your data from MS excel to G-Excel which can be shared and at the same time (considering users have read-write access) can work on the file at the same time. Any changes in the file by the specific user will be visible to the other user during same time of access.


Douglas Weidner
 

Abdul,

As you have heard in this group and probably know by now, there are many processes and technologies for K Sharing, from repositories for sharing explicit (already codified) K and information, to some pretty sophisticated tacit K transfer processes and techniques.

But, as many have said in this group and we count as an essential, first principle/step: you must know and define your real/specific K sharing/transfer needs.

At the KM Institute, for explicit K we know everyone already has a repository of some sort. The issue is that many repositories are only marginally effective (61% find them ineffective). Typically, that failure is not a software issue, but rather an implementation issue. Many install such KM Systems with little regard for change management, and especially attention to a robust taxonomy.

Also at the KM Institute we have a keen interest in tacit K collaboration, mentoring, sharing and even continuity, especially in the face of retiring 'Baby Boomers', the frequent job rotation of Millennials, and especially for complex organizational processes. There are some proven, evidence-based ways to foster and substantially enrich collaboration in this KM sector. But, most of these solutions are primarily procedural, and many lack infusion of any robust enough, supporting technology.

We have been testing a new structured K collaboration/mentoring software and designing ways to integrate it into the proven tacit processes we teach.

It has some key discriminators for the K Age including: 1) mobile enabled, 2) gamification, and 3) performance oriented algorithms/artificial intelligence. I particularly like its concept of a 4) diagnostic dashboard and 5) control console, such that organizational executives can monitor and stimulate the amount and quality of collaboration in their organization.  

We'll soon inform KMers of our research results. 

Based on prior case studies and preliminary results, we expect the new technology to substantially improve tacit K collaboration with resultant, substantive personal and organizational performance increases.

Douglas Weidner
Exec Chairman, Chief CKM Instructor

On Tue, Jul 16, 2019 at 1:14 AM Abdul Tharayil abdul.tharayil@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

Well, straight to the point. We have used SharePoint 2013 & 365 versions and found it useful to a greater extent. However, it depends upon several factors and one of them is your intranet platform. For us, our intranet is on SharePoint and that makes it easier for integrating with other corporate Applications/Software (HR/PM) as well. Though I have not used, Oracle and SAP do have KM modules that could be utilised if that is fitting to your requirement. On the other hand if you need to decide on a platform, just google for check-list of items to be considered for KM platform/software, you will be able to find some, if not many. I had a checklist prepared a few years ago, incase l find it l shall fwd it to you,  if you think it would be of help.

Abdul Jaleel
Kuwait


Susan Ostreicher
 

Hi Jonathan, 

You've already said you tend to focus more on people than software. I also agree with Tom's points about not introducing software unless the process itself is strong, and about not being able to "drag and drop" solutions from one organization to another. 

Having said that, and in the spirit of just sharing a solution that we've used and found helpful: We use Confluence for internal documentation. Confluence is essentially a wiki, so while most of our documentation is maintained by a small group, it's also easy for any user to jump in and add or correct information, and easy for us as knowledge managers to monitor these changes. 

For knowledge capture, we're piloting a discussion board feature for peer-to-peer questions and answers. Users can post a new question by creating a new Confluence page from a simple template. Other users who are signed up for notifications receive an email with the question in it, and they can open the page to leave a comment. Since the discussion board is also on Confluence, it's easily searchable alongside the rest of our documentation. We're using page-level metadata to mark questions as resolved. We're also using internal links to show a list of related documentation on each discussion board post, and a list of related posts on each documentation page. The goal is to make it easier to get questions answered, easier to automatically create a record of those answers, and easier to see contextual information whether you're reading a post or reading our "official" documentation. 

It sounds like the question here is about how to share lessons learned. I'm guessing that means that lessons learned are documented after every project, regardless of whether someone is asking a question - so it would be more of a "push" situation, versus our "pull" situation. I think a wiki could still work in this scenario - you probably wouldn't want to send notifications for every new page, but you could still use simple templates to make it easy to add new pages, and metadata to make them easier to "mine" later on. Of course, if some of the stuff being captured isn't useful to begin with, then software probably won't solve that problem. And it would be good to clearly understand why knowledge is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums today. If that's where the rest of the work happens, then it might seem like an extra burden for users to go somewhere else to capture lessons learned. 

Hope this helps,
Susan

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019 at 5:03 AM jonathan.norman@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I was recently approached by one of the Major Projects Association members looking for advice. Personally, I tend to focus far more on the people - activities, events, processes for knowledge sharing, rather than the software but let me share the query they sent me.

I'd be very grateful for any advice on this. Here is his query:

"We don’t have a corporate solution for knowledge capture and re-use.  Although we do lessons learned, the data is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums, and hence cannot be easily shared.  A high degree of the stuff captured tends to be ‘what we learnt on this problem’, rather than being what did we learn that is transferable, and what would I pass-on as my legacy, or to the next incumbent.  Likewise, when starting the next project, the data tends to have been about a specific instance and not very helpful.  It would be helpful to be able to data mine for projects of a similar nature and find relevant lessons.

 

I’m probably just looking for the art of the possible at this stage to see what software packages other organisations use and find helpful. We have SAP and Oracle P6 as our major systems so is there anything of a similar robustness?"



Jonathan Norman
 

Wow, thanks, Susan. You are the second person to recommend Confluence. I am grateful for your fulsome response.


From: sikmleaders@... on behalf of Susan Ostreicher susan.ostreicher@... [sikmleaders]
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:44:32 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing
 
 

Hi Jonathan, 

You've already said you tend to focus more on people than software. I also agree with Tom's points about not introducing software unless the process itself is strong, and about not being able to "drag and drop" solutions from one organization to another. 

Having said that, and in the spirit of just sharing a solution that we've used and found helpful: We use Confluence for internal documentation. Confluence is essentially a wiki, so while most of our documentation is maintained by a small group, it's also easy for any user to jump in and add or correct information, and easy for us as knowledge managers to monitor these changes. 

For knowledge capture, we're piloting a discussion board feature for peer-to-peer questions and answers. Users can post a new question by creating a new Confluence page from a simple template. Other users who are signed up for notifications receive an email with the question in it, and they can open the page to leave a comment. Since the discussion board is also on Confluence, it's easily searchable alongside the rest of our documentation. We're using page-level metadata to mark questions as resolved. We're also using internal links to show a list of related documentation on each discussion board post, and a list of related posts on each documentation page. The goal is to make it easier to get questions answered, easier to automatically create a record of those answers, and easier to see contextual information whether you're reading a post or reading our "official" documentation. 

It sounds like the question here is about how to share lessons learned. I'm guessing that means that lessons learned are documented after every project, regardless of whether someone is asking a question - so it would be more of a "push" situation, versus our "pull" situation. I think a wiki could still work in this scenario - you probably wouldn't want to send notifications for every new page, but you could still use simple templates to make it easy to add new pages, and metadata to make them easier to "mine" later on. Of course, if some of the stuff being captured isn't useful to begin with, then software probably won't solve that problem. And it would be good to clearly understand why knowledge is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums today. If that's where the rest of the work happens, then it might seem like an extra burden for users to go somewhere else to capture lessons learned. 

Hope this helps,
Susan

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019 at 5:03 AM jonathan.norman@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:
 

I was recently approached by one of the Major Projects Association members looking for advice. Personally, I tend to focus far more on the people - activities, events, processes for knowledge sharing, rather than the software but let me share the query they sent me.

I'd be very grateful for any advice on this. Here is his query:

"We don’t have a corporate solution for knowledge capture and re-use.  Although we do lessons learned, the data is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums, and hence cannot be easily shared.  A high degree of the stuff captured tends to be ‘what we learnt on this problem’, rather than being what did we learn that is transferable, and what would I pass-on as my legacy, or to the next incumbent.  Likewise, when starting the next project, the data tends to have been about a specific instance and not very helpful.  It would be helpful to be able to data mine for projects of a similar nature and find relevant lessons.

 

I’m probably just looking for the art of the possible at this stage to see what software packages other organisations use and find helpful. We have SAP and Oracle P6 as our major systems so is there anything of a similar robustness?"



Frank Guerino
 

Hi Jonathan,

 

I’m with Susan on the Confluence recommendation.  However, I’d like to point out that it’s more than just Confluence, alone.  It’s more of “Atlassian as an integrated platform” solution, where Confluence is just one component along with other tools such as Jira, Bitbucket, etc.  I suggest looking at the entire Atlassian suite of products: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlassian

 

NOTE: The reason that Confluence is rapidly evolving in the KM spaces is that Developers and engineers tend to have very significant and complex KM requirements, driven by things like federated development, data integrations between systems, heavy automation utilization, and their need for speed.  The downside is that we’re seeing more bifurcation of tools in businesses, where the technology teams are moving toward Atlassian and leaving their non-technical business counterparts in SharePoint (double systems and double the costs).  The dilemma for the business is that they can’t stop their tech teams from moving away from SharePoint without impairing their own business competitiveness due to their massive reliance on technology.

 

You also mentioned the desire for “mining” and “analytics/insights.”  The advanced (and more expensive) answer to these requirements are Big Data Lakes (static data) and Data Streams (dynamic data) that are composed of both unstructured and structured data sources and that are harvested for knowledge using fit for purpose tools.  Many companies are successfully using these solutions for things like:

 

  • Incident Avoidance (avoids customer disruptions, ensures higher levels of safety, and reduces support costs)
  • Sentiment Analysis (purchase intent predictions resulting in dynamic marketing and sales)
  • Better/faster medical diagnosis and treatments
  • Etc.

 

The reality is that platforms like Confluence and SharePoint solve some problems but can only do so much, which is why so many other tools are evolving to help solve knowledge problems, and why the investments in these alternatives are massive.

 

I hope this helps.

 

My Best,


Frank

--

Frank Guerino, Principal Managing Partner

The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

Guerino1_Skype (S)

 

 

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of SIKM Leaders
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders
Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 at 3:22 PM
To: SIKM Leaders
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Wow, thanks, Susan. You are the second person to recommend Confluence. I am grateful for your fulsome response.


From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of Susan Ostreicher susan.ostreicher@... [sikmleaders]
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:44:32 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Hi Jonathan, 

 

You've already said you tend to focus more on people than software. I also agree with Tom's points about not introducing software unless the process itself is strong, and about not being able to "drag and drop" solutions from one organization to another. 

 

Having said that, and in the spirit of just sharing a solution that we've used and found helpful: We use Confluence for internal documentation. Confluence is essentially a wiki, so while most of our documentation is maintained by a small group, it's also easy for any user to jump in and add or correct information, and easy for us as knowledge managers to monitor these changes. 

 

For knowledge capture, we're piloting a discussion board feature for peer-to-peer questions and answers. Users can post a new question by creating a new Confluence page from a simple template. Other users who are signed up for notifications receive an email with the question in it, and they can open the page to leave a comment. Since the discussion board is also on Confluence, it's easily searchable alongside the rest of our documentation. We're using page-level metadata to mark questions as resolved. We're also using internal links to show a list of related documentation on each discussion board post, and a list of related posts on each documentation page. The goal is to make it easier to get questions answered, easier to automatically create a record of those answers, and easier to see contextual information whether you're reading a post or reading our "official" documentation. 

 

It sounds like the question here is about how to share lessons learned.. I'm guessing that means that lessons learned are documented after every project, regardless of whether someone is asking a question - so it would be more of a "push" situation, versus our "pull" situation. I think a wiki could still work in this scenario - you probably wouldn't want to send notifications for every new page, but you could still use simple templates to make it easy to add new pages, and metadata to make them easier to "mine" later on. Of course, if some of the stuff being captured isn't useful to begin with, then software probably won't solve that problem. And it would be good to clearly understand why knowledge is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums today. If that's where the rest of the work happens, then it might seem like an extra burden for users to go somewhere else to capture lessons learned. 

 

Hope this helps,

Susan

 

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019 at 5:03 AM jonathan.norman@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was recently approached by one of the Major Projects Association members looking for advice. Personally, I tend to focus far more on the people - activities, events, processes for knowledge sharing, rather than the software but let me share the query they sent me.

 

I'd be very grateful for any advice on this. Here is his query:

 

"We don’t have a corporate solution for knowledge capture and re-use.  Although we do lessons learned, the data is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums, and hence cannot be easily shared.  A high degree of the stuff captured tends to be ‘what we learnt on this problem’, rather than being what did we learn that is transferable, and what would I pass-on as my legacy, or to the next incumbent.  Likewise, when starting the next project, the data tends to have been about a specific instance and not very helpful.  It would be helpful to be able to data mine for projects of a similar nature and find relevant lessons.

 

I’m probably just looking for the art of the possible at this stage to see what software packages other organisations use and find helpful. We have SAP and Oracle P6 as our major systems so is there anything of a similar robustness?"

 


Jonathan Norman
 

Again, I can’t begin to express my gratitude for the detailed advice I have received from many people in the group.

 

This is tremendous.

 

Jonathan

Jonathan Norman

Knowledge Manager

Major Projects Knowledge Hub

07387 268596

www.majorprojectsknowledgehub.net

www.majorprojects.org

If you no longer wish to receive emails from us please reply to this email address. View our updated privacy policy by following this link.

 

Major Projects Association is a Company Limited by Guarantee

Registered Company Number: 2157656 (England & Wales)

Registered Address: 1 Abbey Park Lodge, Abbey Street, Eynsham, Oxfordshire, OX29 4FN

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: 18 July 2019 13:45
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Hi Jonathan,

 

I’m with Susan on the Confluence recommendation.  However, I’d like to point out that it’s more than just Confluence, alone.  It’s more of “Atlassian as an integrated platform” solution, where Confluence is just one component along with other tools such as Jira, Bitbucket, etc.  I suggest looking at the entire Atlassian suite of products: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlassian

 

NOTE: The reason that Confluence is rapidly evolving in the KM spaces is that Developers and engineers tend to have very significant and complex KM requirements, driven by things like federated development, data integrations between systems, heavy automation utilization, and their need for speed.  The downside is that we’re seeing more bifurcation of tools in businesses, where the technology teams are moving toward Atlassian and leaving their non-technical business counterparts in SharePoint (double systems and double the costs).  The dilemma for the business is that they can’t stop their tech teams from moving away from SharePoint without impairing their own business competitiveness due to their massive reliance on technology.

 

You also mentioned the desire for “mining” and “analytics/insights.”  The advanced (and more expensive) answer to these requirements are Big Data Lakes (static data) and Data Streams (dynamic data) that are composed of both unstructured and structured data sources and that are harvested for knowledge using fit for purpose tools.  Many companies are successfully using these solutions for things like:

 

  • Incident Avoidance (avoids customer disruptions, ensures higher levels of safety, and reduces support costs)
  • Sentiment Analysis (purchase intent predictions resulting in dynamic marketing and sales)
  • Better/faster medical diagnosis and treatments
  • Etc.

 

The reality is that platforms like Confluence and SharePoint solve some problems but can only do so much, which is why so many other tools are evolving to help solve knowledge problems, and why the investments in these alternatives are massive.

 

I hope this helps.

 

My Best,


Frank

--

Frank Guerino, Principal Managing Partner

The International Foundation for Information Technology (IF4IT)
http://www.if4it.com
1.908.294.5191 (M)

Guerino1_Skype (S)

 

 

From: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Reply-To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 at 3:22 PM
To: SIKM Leaders <sikmleaders@...>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Wow, thanks, Susan. You are the second person to recommend Confluence. I am grateful for your fulsome response.


From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...> on behalf of Susan Ostreicher susan.ostreicher@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:44:32 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Hi Jonathan, 

 

You've already said you tend to focus more on people than software. I also agree with Tom's points about not introducing software unless the process itself is strong, and about not being able to "drag and drop" solutions from one organization to another. 

 

Having said that, and in the spirit of just sharing a solution that we've used and found helpful: We use Confluence for internal documentation. Confluence is essentially a wiki, so while most of our documentation is maintained by a small group, it's also easy for any user to jump in and add or correct information, and easy for us as knowledge managers to monitor these changes. 

 

For knowledge capture, we're piloting a discussion board feature for peer-to-peer questions and answers. Users can post a new question by creating a new Confluence page from a simple template. Other users who are signed up for notifications receive an email with the question in it, and they can open the page to leave a comment. Since the discussion board is also on Confluence, it's easily searchable alongside the rest of our documentation.. We're using page-level metadata to mark questions as resolved. We're also using internal links to show a list of related documentation on each discussion board post, and a list of related posts on each documentation page. The goal is to make it easier to get questions answered, easier to automatically create a record of those answers, and easier to see contextual information whether you're reading a post or reading our "official" documentation. 

 

It sounds like the question here is about how to share lessons learned.. I'm guessing that means that lessons learned are documented after every project, regardless of whether someone is asking a question - so it would be more of a "push" situation, versus our "pull" situation. I think a wiki could still work in this scenario - you probably wouldn't want to send notifications for every new page, but you could still use simple templates to make it easy to add new pages, and metadata to make them easier to "mine" later on. Of course, if some of the stuff being captured isn't useful to begin with, then software probably won't solve that problem. And it would be good to clearly understand why knowledge is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums today. If that's where the rest of the work happens, then it might seem like an extra burden for users to go somewhere else to capture lessons learned. 

 

Hope this helps,

Susan

 

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019 at 5:03 AM jonathan.norman@... [sikmleaders] <sikmleaders@...> wrote:

 

I was recently approached by one of the Major Projects Association members looking for advice. Personally, I tend to focus far more on the people - activities, events, processes for knowledge sharing, rather than the software but let me share the query they sent me.

 

I'd be very grateful for any advice on this. Here is his query:

 

"We don’t have a corporate solution for knowledge capture and re-use.  Although we do lessons learned, the data is captured locally in spreadsheets and other mediums, and hence cannot be easily shared.  A high degree of the stuff captured tends to be ‘what we learnt on this problem’, rather than being what did we learn that is transferable, and what would I pass-on as my legacy, or to the next incumbent.  Likewise, when starting the next project, the data tends to have been about a specific instance and not very helpful.  It would be helpful to be able to data mine for projects of a similar nature and find relevant lessons.

 

I’m probably just looking for the art of the possible at this stage to see what software packages other organisations use and find helpful. We have SAP and Oracle P6 as our major systems so is there anything of a similar robustness?"

 


Jeff Stemke
 

Hi Jonathan,


As Chevron’s Knowledge Strategist for over 25 years, I learned, like many of us, that a successful KM program has four important elements: effective knowledge transfer processes, shaping sharing behaviors, enabling technology (Lotus Notes in those days) and documenting tangible business value. We addressed all these elements and saved billions with best practices and lessons learned.


We know that too many KM programs start (and end) with the technology and ignore the other elements, especially demonstrating business value.


There is a mind-boggling array of tools on the market today. Yet companies I have talked to or worked with haven’t found anything to match what we had at Chevron.


So, I decided to build my own. The design criteria include: the ability to find relevant information quickly (one click), visual maps that accelerate competency by teaching new employees how to think like an expert, processes such as Q&A, best practices, lessons learned and member expertise profiles, easy capture and tracking of business value and built on a commonly available SharePoint platform.


If you would like more information and short demo of Visual-KnowHow for SharePoint, check out transferknowhow.com.


--Jeff Stemke


Jeff@...



Jonathan Norman
 

Thanks so much for this Jeff,

 

I am collating all the responses I have received today and I’ll send this onto the person who enquired.

 

BR

 

Jonathan

Jonathan Norman

Knowledge Manager

Major Projects Knowledge Hub

07387 268596

www.majorprojectsknowledgehub.net

www.majorprojects.org

If you no longer wish to receive emails from us please reply to this email address. View our updated privacy policy by following this link.

 

Major Projects Association is a Company Limited by Guarantee

Registered Company Number: 2157656 (England & Wales)

Registered Address: 1 Abbey Park Lodge, Abbey Street, Eynsham, Oxfordshire, OX29 4FN

 

 

 

 

From: sikmleaders@... <sikmleaders@...>
Sent: 18 July 2019 23:19
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Advice on software for knowledge sharing

 

 

Hi Jonathan,

 

As Chevron’s Knowledge Strategist for over 25 years, I learned, like many of us, that a successful KM program has four important elements: effective knowledge transfer processes, shaping sharing behaviors, enabling technology (Lotus Notes in those days) and documenting tangible business value. We addressed all these elements and saved billions with best practices and lessons learned.

 

We know that too many KM programs start (and end) with the technology and ignore the other elements, especially demonstrating business value.

 

There is a mind-boggling array of tools on the market today. Yet companies I have talked to or worked with haven’t found anything to match what we had at Chevron.

 

So, I decided to build my own. The design criteria include: the ability to find relevant information quickly (one click), visual maps that accelerate competency by teaching new employees how to think like an expert, processes such as Q&A, best practices, lessons learned and member expertise profiles, easy capture and tracking of business value and built on a commonly available SharePoint platform.

 

If you would like more information and short demo of Visual-KnowHow for SharePoint, check out transferknowhow.com.

 

--Jeff Stemke

 

Jeff@...