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Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid #COVID-19


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here. 


Murray Jennex
 

nice article.  A quick observation, you asked how many companies were prepared.  I started working crisis response with Y2K and we learned then that organizations have short memories, a crisis occurs, the organization responds and vows to be ready next time, but then 3-6 months after the priority of being prepared becomes less important and ultimately forgotten.  This is even true for pandemics, our US stockpile for masks and supplies was ready for the H1N1 pandemic and was greatly depleted.  Did we replenish?  Sadly we did not and are rushing now to find supplies and ramp up production.  Will we remember after covid-19 is past its peak and replenish?  I hope so but doubt it.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 1, 2020 9:56 am
Subject: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here. 


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

It is a shame that we tend to go back to our old ways once we cross the crisis.
As they say, old habits die hard!
We need conscience keepers in every place to help us remember what we learned!

Regards
N

On Thu, 2 Apr 2020 at 01:06, Murray Jennex <murphjen@...> wrote:
nice article.  A quick observation, you asked how many companies were prepared.  I started working crisis response with Y2K and we learned then that organizations have short memories, a crisis occurs, the organization responds and vows to be ready next time, but then 3-6 months after the priority of being prepared becomes less important and ultimately forgotten.  This is even true for pandemics, our US stockpile for masks and supplies was ready for the H1N1 pandemic and was greatly depleted.  Did we replenish?  Sadly we did not and are rushing now to find supplies and ramp up production.  Will we remember after covid-19 is past its peak and replenish?  I hope so but doubt it.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 1, 2020 9:56 am
Subject: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here. 



--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Murray Jennex
 

actually, I think this is where KM can add great value.  I've attached a paper I did in 2003 following Y2K and 9/11.  We were wondering why people who were so well prepared for Y2K were not prepared following 9/11.  Our hypothesis was that those organizations that had a KM strategy would be more likely to capture the benefits of knowledge gained from projects like Y2K.  Our results were overwhelming in support of this if the organization had a KM strategy during Y2K and after Y2K.  I've attached the paper for those interested but this research has convinced me that the best way for an organization to remember what its done is by having a KM organization with a knowledge strategy.....murray jennex

let me know if you need citation information, the paper was presented and published by the HICSS conference


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <nirmala.pal@...>
To: Murray Jennex <murphjen@...>
Cc: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 3, 2020 10:25 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

It is a shame that we tend to go back to our old ways once we cross the crisis.
As they say, old habits die hard!
We need conscience keepers in every place to help us remember what we learned!

Regards
N

On Thu, 2 Apr 2020 at 01:06, Murray Jennex <murphjen@...> wrote:
nice article.  A quick observation, you asked how many companies were prepared.  I started working crisis response with Y2K and we learned then that organizations have short memories, a crisis occurs, the organization responds and vows to be ready next time, but then 3-6 months after the priority of being prepared becomes less important and ultimately forgotten.  This is even true for pandemics, our US stockpile for masks and supplies was ready for the H1N1 pandemic and was greatly depleted.  Did we replenish?  Sadly we did not and are rushing now to find supplies and ramp up production.  Will we remember after covid-19 is past its peak and replenish?  I hope so but doubt it.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 1, 2020 9:56 am
Subject: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here. 



--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Thank you for sharing this, Murray
Will run through it this week. :-)
Regards
N

On Mon, 6 Apr 2020 at 06:59, Murray Jennex <murphjen@...> wrote:
actually, I think this is where KM can add great value.  I've attached a paper I did in 2003 following Y2K and 9/11.  We were wondering why people who were so well prepared for Y2K were not prepared following 9/11.  Our hypothesis was that those organizations that had a KM strategy would be more likely to capture the benefits of knowledge gained from projects like Y2K.  Our results were overwhelming in support of this if the organization had a KM strategy during Y2K and after Y2K.  I've attached the paper for those interested but this research has convinced me that the best way for an organization to remember what its done is by having a KM organization with a knowledge strategy.....murray jennex

let me know if you need citation information, the paper was presented and published by the HICSS conference


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <nirmala.pal@...>
To: Murray Jennex <murphjen@...>
Cc: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Apr 3, 2020 10:25 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

It is a shame that we tend to go back to our old ways once we cross the crisis.
As they say, old habits die hard!
We need conscience keepers in every place to help us remember what we learned!

Regards
N

On Thu, 2 Apr 2020 at 01:06, Murray Jennex <murphjen@...> wrote:
nice article.  A quick observation, you asked how many companies were prepared.  I started working crisis response with Y2K and we learned then that organizations have short memories, a crisis occurs, the organization responds and vows to be ready next time, but then 3-6 months after the priority of being prepared becomes less important and ultimately forgotten.  This is even true for pandemics, our US stockpile for masks and supplies was ready for the H1N1 pandemic and was greatly depleted.  Did we replenish?  Sadly we did not and are rushing now to find supplies and ramp up production.  Will we remember after covid-19 is past its peak and replenish?  I hope so but doubt it.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Nirmala Palaniappan <Nirmala.pal@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Apr 1, 2020 9:56 am
Subject: [SIKM] Sharing my article on KM in the times of Covid

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here. 



--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


 

Hi Nirmala,

I completely agree that the focus is once again first on tools and not in the way how to intelligently use them. Here my thoughts for the same topic:
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/knowledge-management-age-corona-pavel-kraus/

Regards,
Pavel

Hope this article resonates with all the KMers here.