Knowledge recognition technologies #tools


Mila Malekolkalami
 


Hello to everyone! Hope you are fine and safe.
I need some help to identify the different technologies using for knowledge recognition.

Is there a source to list the technologies in knowledge processes such as recognition, representation, creation and etc?

Thank you



Stan Garfield
 

Hi, Mila.

Thanks for posting again!

Please say a bit more about your query.  What do you mean by knowledge recognition?  How are you planning to use the information you are seeking?

Regards,
Stan


Mila Malekolkalami
 

I need to identify different technologies in KM.
What technologies are used in different KM processes?

I have read Nick Milton's book, knowledge technologies. But i didn't find what I need.

For example, Orbital and Skillsoft are sample vendors in knowledge creation.

But I cant find any technologies that are used for recognition of knowledge.
I have to find these technologies used in organizations and compare them together.



On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 9:54 PM, Stan Garfield
<stangarfield@...> wrote:
Hi, Mila.

Thanks for posting again!

Please say a bit more about your query.  What do you mean by knowledge recognition?  How are you planning to use the information you are seeking?

Regards,
Stan


 

Hi Mila

 

Not sure I have enough to help you, but would offer the following hi-level considerations that might tighten up your question’s focus:

 

  1. Do you have an idea of the organization’s’ business environment and the knowledge management environment? 
    1. Why does the organization exist? What is the mission? 
    2. What kind of tech and tools does the organization have to support knowledge capture, sharing, etc?
    3. What kind of knowledge sharing culture exists to support the use of knowledge and the flow of knwoedge within and across the organization?
  2. Where are the gaps between what they want to do and what KM technologies they need to do it?

 

 

Available discuss further if you wish. Others here can also help. Hope this helps.

 

Best

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 10:40
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge recognition technologies

 

I need to identify different technologies in KM.

What technologies are used in different KM processes?

 

I have read Nick Milton's book, knowledge technologies. But i didn't find what I need.


For example, Orbital and Skillsoft are sample vendors in knowledge creation.

 

But I cant find any technologies that are used for recognition of knowledge.

I have to find these technologies used in organizations and compare them together.

 

 

 

On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 9:54 PM, Stan Garfield

<stangarfield@...> wrote:

Hi, Mila.

Thanks for posting again!

Please say a bit more about your query.  What do you mean by knowledge recognition?  How are you planning to use the information you are seeking?

Regards,
Stan


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Mila,

I'm not sure you'll find a comprehensive list of technologies for "knowledge recognition" per se, because the range of possible techniques that can be applied is so broad. Many tools also tend to be domain-specific rather than general in nature -- for example, in healthcare.

As per the Firestone and McElroy Decision Execution Cycle (itself derived from the Popper's Tetradic Schema) we may consider the process of knowledge recognition to have 3 broad components -- contextualising and recognising problems, identifying alternative solutions, and error elimination and selection.

Each of these areas can have knowledge tools deployed independently, although many technologies support two or all of these areas:

1. Contextualising and recognising problems
  • qualitative data analysis (eg NVivo, text mining)
  • quantitative data analysis (eg SPSS, R)
  • inference and auto-classification (eg semantic web, graph technology)
  • big data / AI insights (eg behaviour prediction, automated medical diagnosis)
2. Identifying alternative solutions
  • support facilitation (eg help desks, consulting)
  • topic-specific information repositories (eg intranets, knowledge bases)
  • natural language query interfaces (eg chatbots)
3. Error elimination and selection
  • triage / diagnostic / differential tools (eg MYCIN)
  • recommendation engines (eg Siri, YouTube, Netflix)

Hope this provides a useful starting point.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 16/04/2020 3:39 am, Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io wrote:

I need to identify different technologies in KM.
What technologies are used in different KM processes?

I have read Nick Milton's book, knowledge technologies. But i didn't find what I need.

For example, Orbital and Skillsoft are sample vendors in knowledge creation.

But I cant find any technologies that are used for recognition of knowledge.
I have to find these technologies used in organizations and compare them together.



On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 9:54 PM, Stan Garfield
Hi, Mila.

Thanks for posting again!

Please say a bit more about your query.  What do you mean by knowledge recognition?  How are you planning to use the information you are seeking?

Regards,
Stan


Mila Malekolkalami
 

Bill and stephen thanks for your emails.

Stephen, thanks your email is really helpful.


On Thu, Apr 16, 2020 at 8:10 AM, Stephen Bounds
<km@...> wrote:

Hi Mila,

I'm not sure you'll find a comprehensive list of technologies for "knowledge recognition" per se, because the range of possible techniques that can be applied is so broad. Many tools also tend to be domain-specific rather than general in nature -- for example, in healthcare.

As per the Firestone and McElroy Decision Execution Cycle (itself derived from the Popper's Tetradic Schema) we may consider the process of knowledge recognition to have 3 broad components -- contextualising and recognising problems, identifying alternative solutions, and error elimination and selection.

Each of these areas can have knowledge tools deployed independently, although many technologies support two or all of these areas:

1. Contextualising and recognising problems
  • qualitative data analysis (eg NVivo, text mining)
  • quantitative data analysis (eg SPSS, R)
  • inference and auto-classification (eg semantic web, graph technology)
  • big data / AI insights (eg behaviour prediction, automated medical diagnosis)
2. Identifying alternative solutions
  • support facilitation (eg help desks, consulting)
  • topic-specific information repositories (eg intranets, knowledge bases)
  • natural language query interfaces (eg chatbots)
3. Error elimination and selection
  • triage / diagnostic / differential tools (eg MYCIN)
  • recommendation engines (eg Siri, YouTube, Netflix)

Hope this provides a useful starting point.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 16/04/2020 3:39 am, Mila Malekolkalami via groups.io wrote:
I need to identify different technologies in KM.
What technologies are used in different KM processes?

I have read Nick Milton's book, knowledge technologies. But i didn't find what I need.

For example, Orbital and Skillsoft are sample vendors in knowledge creation.

But I cant find any technologies that are used for recognition of knowledge.
I have to find these technologies used in organizations and compare them together.



On Wed, Apr 15, 2020 at 9:54 PM, Stan Garfield
Hi, Mila.

Thanks for posting again!

Please say a bit more about your query.  What do you mean by knowledge recognition?  How are you planning to use the information you are seeking?

Regards,
Stan


Rahul Lama
 

Hi Stephen,

Thanks for this detailed message. I am currently looking out for a tech platform for hosting captured knowledge in the form of videos/articles for a startup. Any suggestions on which tech platform I can look at, apart from slack/yammer/groups.io? Also, I am considering recommending groups.io to my organization. Any thoughts on that? We don't have any intranet or blog yet.

Thanks,
Rahul


Aprill Allen
 

hi Rahul,

Guru is simple, easy to integrate, and affordable. https://www.getguru.com/

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


 

Hi,

I am wondering how this Guru will perform after one year when full of material and used by a multitude of users.

Or will it go the path of so many other applications that are cherished at the beginning and abandoned later due to information overload.

As I described in this article though, the next empty application is already around the corner :)
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bliss-empty-applications-pavel-kraus/

Best Pavel Kraus

 

hi Rahul,

Guru is simple, easy to integrate, and affordable. https://www.getguru.com/

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Douglas Weidner
 

Hi Pavel,
Great and simple article - right to the sad, but true, point: 

"So what would be needed to keep everybody happy? This is what nobody wants to hear. Namely, some type of agreed governance, some guidelines for naming, rules how to structure the information. And the discipline to do it. This takes effort and logical work. Nobody wants to do this really."

The corollary might be: It's not the tool, but rather the process around it.  In other words, even a mediocre tool can be successful if properly tuned for an important purpose. But, alas, such tuning involves human commitment and effort and we are all too busy for that, it seems.

Cheers,
Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 4:01 AM Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am wondering how this Guru will perform after one year when full of material and used by a multitude of users.

Or will it go the path of so many other applications that are cherished at the beginning and abandoned later due to information overload.

As I described in this article though, the next empty application is already around the corner :)
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bliss-empty-applications-pavel-kraus/

Best Pavel Kraus

 
hi Rahul,

Guru is simple, easy to integrate, and affordable. https://www.getguru.com/

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Douglas,

I wouldn't be quite so cynical about human nature. What Pavel describes seems nearly inevitable to me without some forethought and planning -- perhaps we might call it 'knowledge system engineering'?

All 'grassroots' information systems (that is, those that grow without explicit top-down management directives) exist because of a simple equation: that the value achieved from retrieving information is less than the cost required to store and access it.

However as a system grows in size and complexity we face an inevitable trade-off: do we increase the cost of access (an increased time to search and find what you're looking for), or the cost of storage (by requiring better metadata and organisation)?

If we socialise the increased costs, those who only marginally value the benefits of the system will stop using it. Information managers often try to address the increased cost of access by increasing the cost of storage -- for example, by adding a mandatory metadata entry screen to the system. This is generally a false economy and just adds friction for those people who are adding the most value -- the contributors.

On the other hand, dedicating a librarian or other devoted resource to management of the system becomes a corporate overhead, creating a much more explicit (financial) cost/benefit to justify. Since information systems are prone to being under-valued due to psychological distancing, it is typically necessary to educate people about the system's benefits on an ongoing basis.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 10/06/2020 9:33 pm, Douglas Weidner wrote:

Hi Pavel,
Great and simple article - right to the sad, but true, point: 

"So what would be needed to keep everybody happy? This is what nobody wants to hear. Namely, some type of agreed governance, some guidelines for naming, rules how to structure the information. And the discipline to do it. This takes effort and logical work. Nobody wants to do this really."

The corollary might be: It's not the tool, but rather the process around it.  In other words, even a mediocre tool can be successful if properly tuned for an important purpose. But, alas, such tuning involves human commitment and effort and we are all too busy for that, it seems.

Cheers,
Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 4:01 AM Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am wondering how this Guru will perform after one year when full of material and used by a multitude of users.

Or will it go the path of so many other applications that are cherished at the beginning and abandoned later due to information overload.

As I described in this article though, the next empty application is already around the corner :)
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bliss-empty-applications-pavel-kraus/

Best Pavel Kraus

 
hi Rahul,

Guru is simple, easy to integrate, and affordable. https://www.getguru.com/

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


 

Hi Douglas,

we are exactly on the same page. I have tried to make similar points in my last few LinkedIn articles about the working from home during corona lockdown.

By the way, I greatly enjoyed having been on the Swiss CKM faculty for many years. It is a pity we do not have your CKM courses in Switzerland anymore.

Cheers,
Pavel

 
-- 
Dr. Pavel Kraus
AHT intermediation GmbH
Churerstrasse 35
8808 Pfäffikon

+41 79 396 55 35
www.aht.ch
pavel.kraus@...
https://www.linkedin.com/in/pavel-kraus/

------------------------------
Präsident SKMF
SWISS KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT FORUM
www.skmf.net

Hi Pavel,
Great and simple article - right to the sad, but true, point: 

"So what would be needed to keep everybody happy? This is what nobody wants to hear. Namely, some type of agreed governance, some guidelines for naming, rules how to structure the information. And the discipline to do it. This takes effort and logical work. Nobody wants to do this really."

The corollary might be: It's not the tool, but rather the process around it.  In other words, even a mediocre tool can be successful if properly tuned for an important purpose. But, alas, such tuning involves human commitment and effort and we are all too busy for that, it seems.

Cheers,
Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Wed, Jun 10, 2020 at 4:01 AM Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...> wrote:
Hi,

I am wondering how this Guru will perform after one year when full of material and used by a multitude of users.

Or will it go the path of so many other applications that are cherished at the beginning and abandoned later due to information overload.

As I described in this article though, the next empty application is already around the corner :)
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/bliss-empty-applications-pavel-kraus/

Best Pavel Kraus

 
hi Rahul,

Guru is simple, easy to integrate, and affordable. https://www.getguru.com/

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com




Rahul Lama
 

Hi Aprill,

We got in touch with the Guru team and their enterprise version is very expensive for my organization. 

We are thinking of the Discourse platform for piloting. Any platforms we can use for as Forums or for Q&A for the org where everyone can ask questions, seek people and connect? Would Groups.io be a good fit for that?

Regards,
Rahul


Aprill Allen
 

Hi Rahul,

Hmm. OK. Good to know re the enterprise cost. 
Discourse and Vanilla are well regarded for forums and Q&A. 
Groups.io is not ideal. There are limitations that don't make it great for large organisations. It's really just a slightly fancy mailing list. 

--

Aprill Allen
Founder and Managing Director | Knowledge Bird
KM Consulting & KCS Training
M: +61 (0)400 101 961
knowledgebird.com


Tom Barfield
 

Rahul – Years ago one of my teams explored an open source Q&A system that was similar to Stack Exchange.  We determined it wasn’t a great fit for us – but could be good for you.  I don’t have details but I just did a search that you might find gives you a whole bunch of ideas to consider.

 

https://www.google.com/search?ei=3NPqXo-qJM7QtQbk2KbICw&q=open+source+stack+overflow+alternative&oq=open+source+stack+overflow+alternative&gs_lcp=CgZwc3ktYWIQAzICCAA6BAgAEA06BggAEAcQHjoICAAQDRAFEB46CAgAEAgQDRAeOgUIIRCrAlCrpAFYo7kBYO-6AWgBcAB4AIABaogBoAaSAQM5LjGYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6&sclient=psy-ab&ved=0ahUKEwiPiIP6qorqAhVOaM0KHWSsCbkQ4dUDCAw&uact=5

 

Tom

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Rahul Lama
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2020 10:57 AM
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge recognition technologies

 

Hi Aprill,

We got in touch with the Guru team and their enterprise version is very expensive for my organization. 

We are thinking of the Discourse platform for piloting. Any platforms we can use for as Forums or for Q&A for the org where everyone can ask questions, seek people and connect? Would Groups.io be a good fit for that?

Regards,
Rahul


Stan Garfield
 

For forums and Q&A, I suggest evaluating these major vendors of Enterprise Social Networks (ESNs):
  1. Atlassian Confluence
  2. Aurea Jive
  3. Facebook Workplace
  4. Google Currents
  5. HCL Connections
  6. Limeade (formerly Sitrion)
  7. Microsoft Yammer
  8. Salesforce Chatter
  9. SAP Jam
  10. TIBCO tibbr


Katrina Pugh
 

Hi, all
I would add to the CoP platforms Influent Solutions ( http://Influentsolutions.ch)  Influent works with UN, WHO, and large cross-organizational networks). (Community Cloud is the name of the product).

(We’re looking at this for a plastic waste nonprofit http://bit.ly/2X4PP20.)

Thanks
Kate

Katrina Pugh
AlignConsulting | Collaboration, Analytics and Strategy
Columbia University | Information and Knowledge Strategy Master of Science Program

On Jun 18, 2020, at 12:24 AM, Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:

For forums and Q&A, I suggest evaluating these major vendors of Enterprise Social Networks (ESNs):
  1. Atlassian Confluence
  2. Aurea Jive
  3. Facebook Workplace
  4. Google Currents
  5. HCL Connections
  6. Limeade (formerly Sitrion)
  7. Microsoft Yammer
  8. Salesforce Chatter
  9. SAP Jam
  10. TIBCO tibbr


Rahul Lama
 

Thanks a lot, Aprill. We got in touch with both Vanilla and Discourse and are currently looking at Discourse for our forums.

Friends, any suggestions on what Intranet software or website we can use for creating an Intranet website for internal use by colleagues at work?

Regards,
Rahul


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Liferay Portals and Collaboration might be a good choice. They have, both, a community and enterprise version. The former is likely to be free....

Regards 
N

On Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 11:57 Rahul Lama, <rlama1990@...> wrote:
Thanks a lot, Aprill. We got in touch with both Vanilla and Discourse and are currently looking at Discourse for our forums.

Friends, any suggestions on what Intranet software or website we can use for creating an Intranet website for internal use by colleagues at work?

Regards,
Rahul


Rahul Lama
 

Hi Nirmala! Thank you for sharing. Will check them out.

Regards,
Rahul Lama

On Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 2:55 pm Nirmala Palaniappan, <Nirmala.pal@...> wrote:
Liferay Portals and Collaboration might be a good choice. They have, both, a community and enterprise version. The former is likely to be free....

Regards 
N

On Fri, 26 Jun 2020, 11:57 Rahul Lama, <rlama1990@...> wrote:
Thanks a lot, Aprill. We got in touch with both Vanilla and Discourse and are currently looking at Discourse for our forums.

Friends, any suggestions on what Intranet software or website we can use for creating an Intranet website for internal use by colleagues at work?

Regards,
Rahul