Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now? #KMers #discussion-starter #jobs #state-of-KM


 

It is painful to observe, that in the Corona crisis a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew. We at SKMF have seen a similar case in 2015. But within 12 months the same company started to build a new KM team again. Because in the meantime, they realized what value the KM team delivered to the whole organization. It almost seems that if the knowledge managers do their job right, they become invisible. Everything runs smooth. So there is an impression they are not needed and in time of crisis they are fired. Any suggestions what KMers can do to communicate their value better?


Nick Milton
 

Hi Pavel

 

My blog post “how to keep your job as knowledge manager” addresses this question

 

http://www.nickmilton.com/2019/01/how-to-keep-your-job-as-knowledge.html

 

Nick

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Pavel Kraus
Sent: 07 May 2020 11:09
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now? #discussion-starter #kmers

 

It is painful to observe, that in the Corona crisis a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew. We at SKMF have seen a similar case in 2015. But within 12 months the same company started to build a new KM team again. Because in the meantime, they realized what value the KM team delivered to the whole organization. It almost seems that if the knowledge managers do their job right, they become invisible. Everything runs smooth. So there is an impression they are not needed and in time of crisis they are fired. Any suggestions what KMers can do to communicate their value better?


Robert L. Bogue
 

While organizations laying off their entire knowledge management team is tragic, I’m not sure it can be simplified to the point of just communicating value better.

 

Organizational leaders have to make decisions that sometimes emphasize short term survival over long term efficiency.  It’s like the way our bodies process stress.  It makes decisions to optimize short term benefits – glucose availability – over long term benefits – infection prevention, digestion, etc.

 

Organizational leaders often are aware that they’ll have to rebuild what they’re shuttering but feel as if it’s the best choice to ensure the organization will continue to exist in the long term.

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it.

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Pavel Kraus via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 6:09 AM
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now? #discussion-starter #kmers

 

It is painful to observe, that in the Corona crisis a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew. We at SKMF have seen a similar case in 2015. But within 12 months the same company started to build a new KM team again. Because in the meantime, they realized what value the KM team delivered to the whole organization. It almost seems that if the knowledge managers do their job right, they become invisible. Everything runs smooth. So there is an impression they are not needed and in time of crisis they are fired. Any suggestions what KMers can do to communicate their value better?


David Eddy
 

Pavel -

>
a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew.
>

Unfortunately in a cash crunch as we have today, work that is not DIRECTLY attached to revenue generation will be cancelled.

It’s a fundamental flaw in accounting practices.  Systems are too squishy & risky to put on the balance sheet, so systems spend  —  your salary  —  is flushed through the income statement.  Just as important as paper clips & toilet paper.

When times are tough… CUT EXPENSES.


In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, IBM’s CEO is quoted as saying they’re already seeing “a pause in transformational projects.

- David


David Sullivan
 

One suggestion would be to offer up projects that don't cost money (or cost very little) but put people to work.  Especially for smaller companies that have PPP loans and have to pay their employees, you may have lots of people on the payroll with little or nothing to do.  Management may welcome a chance to keep them busy and add value.

Do you have a set of documents you'd like to add to your KM database but never had the time to tag them with metadata?  Now you have assistance!

Always wanted to clean out the older docs from the database but not sure which are still valuable and which can be deleted?  Ask the users to do it!

Also a good time to have people fill out a survey on use cases and pain points, so that you have a blueprint for improving the KM system.

David


Dennis Pearce
 

It always seemed to me a strange unfortunate fluke of accounting jargon that people are "expenses" while machines are "assets."


 

Thanks for raising this question for discussion.

 

In talking with clients and potential clients over 20 years, I have always described KM activities and resources, projects and people, as investments, not costs. I also recognize that for many organizations, public and private, expenditures that don’t directly drive revenue may not be seen as investments, either because the return is not imminent or visible, and/or that both the short term and long term opportunity cots are not fully appreciated. Wholesale actions as discussed in the posts reflect perhaps that many organizations still do not appreciate the multidimensional value of the KM investment and focus on the singularity in which “KM” is considered in their organizations which no real connection to longer term value. As stated in a post, in survival it is often the objective numbers, and not necessarily the overall value that is considered. This is really true when the CFO is the decider on projects especially in smaller organizations.

 

It will certainly be interesting to see what this looks like in the KM field at the other end of this crisis. Clearly an opportunity for some doctoral research in many areas.

 

Stay healthy all

 

Best

 

Bill

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of David Eddy via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 7, 2020 05:10
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now?

 

Pavel -

 

a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew.

> 



Unfortunately in a cash crunch as we have today, work that is not DIRECTLY attached to revenue generation will be cancelled.



It’s a fundamental flaw in accounting practices.  Systems are too squishy & risky to put on the balance sheet, so systems spend  —  your salary  —  is flushed through the income statement.  Just as important as paper clips & toilet paper.



When times are tough… CUT EXPENSES.





In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, IBM’s CEO is quoted as saying they’re already seeing “a pause in transformational projects.



- David




Murray Jennex
 

I so agree!! We've researched the concept of intellectual capital and its funny that that concept, while focused on people, doesn't seem to like to mention people.  I did do a paper on how to identify critical knowledge before it walks out the door but still not quite the same thing.   I've also added the idea of human infrastructure to the Jennex-Olfman KM Success Model but I have yet to test it to confirm it (it is supported by the literature so I'm confident its a valid idea) still not much on the human value and human knowledge value to organizations to cause them to be listed as assets rather than their salaries as expenses....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Pearce <denpearce@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Thu, May 7, 2020 7:12 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now?

It always seemed to me a strange unfortunate fluke of accounting jargon that people are "expenses" while machines are "assets."


David Eddy
 

Bill -

>
I have always described KM activities and resources, projects and people, as investments, not costs.
>

How do CFOs respond to calling KM efforts “investments?


A bit of background:
(anyone with more current knowledge of accounting practices, please correct me)

I’m looking at this as software & systems for internal use.

By the rules of FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) 86 for software systems:
1/ - spending through proof-of-feasibility is expensed
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
3/ - after completion maintenance/repairs are expensed

Obviously these rules do not directly address the inconvenient fact that the bulk of KM work is human work, not tools.


There are a variety of forces in play here.

4/ - Accountants are very conservative.

5/ - They do not like to put hard-to-value resources on the balance sheet.

6/ - The intangible aspect of “goodwill” is an excellent example.  Just look at the Kraft-Heinz fiasco where they had to write down $1.2B in “intangible assets.”  Looks bad.

7/ - If software projects  —  an ERP implementation?  —  were put on the balance sheet, the frequency of such large-scale efforts being cancelled is such that it would look bad to regularly write off large amounts of defective “assets.”  Much safer to just dribble the spend through the income statement as G&A.

8/ - It can potentially be dangerous to have juicy assets on the balance sheet… because eventually the tax man will notice & demand their cut.

9/ - Solid software & process management (aka KM) can become more rather than less valuable over time.


A significant conundrum for double entry bookkeeping.

See: H. Thomas Johnson’s Relevance Lost

- David


 

Dear David,

I have attended several Intellectual Capital - Knowledge Management conferences. At one of those, we had a panel discussion with a top executive either from FASB or GAAP. She made a very valid point, which you have under no. 8 bellow.

She said that no company will identify and subsequently put freely and deliberately any unnecessary assets into their balance sheets, which would then trigger the appetite of tax people. I remember that after her statement the spirit of the conference kind of collapsed. Nobody was thinking about this point until that moment. But it is true, there is no interest of companies to pay more taxes.

Pavel

 

Bill -

>
I have always described KM activities and resources, projects and people, as investments, not costs.
>

How do CFOs respond to calling KM efforts “investments?


A bit of background:
(anyone with more current knowledge of accounting practices, please correct me)

I’m looking at this as software & systems for internal use.

By the rules of FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) 86 for software systems:
1/ - spending through proof-of-feasibility is expensed
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
3/ - after completion maintenance/repairs are expensed

Obviously these rules do not directly address the inconvenient fact that the bulk of KM work is human work, not tools.


There are a variety of forces in play here.

4/ - Accountants are very conservative.

5/ - They do not like to put hard-to-value resources on the balance sheet.

6/ - The intangible aspect of “goodwill” is an excellent example.  Just look at the Kraft-Heinz fiasco where they had to write down $1.2B in “intangible assets.”  Looks bad.

7/ - If software projects  —  an ERP implementation?  —  were put on the balance sheet, the frequency of such large-scale efforts being cancelled is such that it would look bad to regularly write off large amounts of defective “assets.”  Much safer to just dribble the spend through the income statement as G&A.

8/ - It can potentially be dangerous to have juicy assets on the balance sheet… because eventually the tax man will notice & demand their cut.

9/ - Solid software & process management (aka KM) can become more rather than less valuable over time.


A significant conundrum for double entry bookkeeping.

See: H. Thomas Johnson’s Relevance Lost

- David


Barbara Fillip
 

Hello everyone,
I'm responding by starting with Nick Milton's blog post key takeaway.

DIRECTLY SUPPORT THE FRONT LINE OF THE BUSINESS - THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE THE MONEY.
In my case, I need to ensure that our KM activities directly support our New Business efforts.  How is the KM team helping proposal teams get quick access to well-curated information about past and ongoing projects?  That's our corporate library activities, which are geared towards proposal needs.  How is the KM team helping proposal teams  access the technical expertise spread across the organization? That's our technical communities of practice being supported with a social enterprise network managed by the KM team. 

Beyond that, I am lucky to be sitting in a very small KM office (myself and one support person) strategically positioned within a broader team focused on "data, innovation and outreach" reporting to the Executive Office. Cutting off KM would not save much money in this case.  And since we are closely associated with the CEO's new corporate strategy, I don't think we are in danger (for now).

Critical to the survival of our KM efforts is also the fact that while the KM team provides guidance and coordination for the technical communities of practice, these technical practice teams are funded in a decentralized fashion by various regional units.  The cost is spread out.  This, while a serious pain to deal with on any given day because they report to these different regional units and not to the KM team, was specifically designed to keep them alive in lean times.  If they had been centralized in one unit, they would be a big target for cuts. 

Finally, remote work (on a global scale) has increased the velocity of our digital transformation and required KM to continue and even expand its collaboration with IT.  In fact, some of the things we were working on around global, virtual communities of practice prior to the crisis, have already made a huge positive difference in our ability to operate effectively in a COVID world. 

Stay well!
Barbara Fillip
Director of Knowledge Management
Chemonics International

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 6:17 AM Nick Milton <nick.milton@...> wrote:

Hi Pavel

 

My blog post “how to keep your job as knowledge manager” addresses this question

 

http://www.nickmilton.com/2019/01/how-to-keep-your-job-as-knowledge.html

 

Nick

 

From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Pavel Kraus
Sent: 07 May 2020 11:09
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now? #discussion-starter #kmers

 

It is painful to observe, that in the Corona crisis a large international company has fired the whole Knowledge Management Crew. We at SKMF have seen a similar case in 2015. But within 12 months the same company started to build a new KM team again. Because in the meantime, they realized what value the KM team delivered to the whole organization. It almost seems that if the knowledge managers do their job right, they become invisible. Everything runs smooth. So there is an impression they are not needed and in time of crisis they are fired. Any suggestions what KMers can do to communicate their value better?


Murray Jennex
 

another reason not to list intellectual capital is that then you have to negotiate pay with the holders of the IC and if the holder sees they are valuable it will raise their asking price....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 5:56 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now?

Dear David,

I have attended several Intellectual Capital - Knowledge Management conferences. At one of those, we had a panel discussion with a top executive either from FASB or GAAP. She made a very valid point, which you have under no. 8 bellow.

She said that no company will identify and subsequently put freely and deliberately any unnecessary assets into their balance sheets, which would then trigger the appetite of tax people. I remember that after her statement the spirit of the conference kind of collapsed. Nobody was thinking about this point until that moment. But it is true, there is no interest of companies to pay more taxes.

Pavel

 
Bill -

>
I have always described KM activities and resources, projects and people, as investments, not costs.
>

How do CFOs respond to calling KM efforts “investments?


A bit of background:
(anyone with more current knowledge of accounting practices, please correct me)

I’m looking at this as software & systems for internal use.

By the rules of FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) 86 for software systems:
1/ - spending through proof-of-feasibility is expensed
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
3/ - after completion maintenance/repairs are expensed

Obviously these rules do not directly address the inconvenient fact that the bulk of KM work is human work, not tools.


There are a variety of forces in play here.

4/ - Accountants are very conservative.

5/ - They do not like to put hard-to-value resources on the balance sheet.

6/ - The intangible aspect of “goodwill” is an excellent example.  Just look at the Kraft-Heinz fiasco where they had to write down $1.2B in “intangible assets.”  Looks bad.

7/ - If software projects  —  an ERP implementation?  —  were put on the balance sheet, the frequency of such large-scale efforts being cancelled is such that it would look bad to regularly write off large amounts of defective “assets.”  Much safer to just dribble the spend through the income statement as G&A.

8/ - It can potentially be dangerous to have juicy assets on the balance sheet… because eventually the tax man will notice & demand their cut.

9/ - Solid software & process management (aka KM) can become more rather than less valuable over time.


A significant conundrum for double entry bookkeeping.

See: H. Thomas Johnson’s Relevance Lost

- David


Jamie Park
 

I haven't read all of the threads - 

But the interesting part of this is the investment of funds into the Knowledge Management in the banking industry. I have just recently acquired a large amount of funding to hire more people as part of a conduct commitment in Enterprise Knowledge capability.


Hence the point about knowledge managers losing jobs right now? 

It is dependant upon the industry and upon which sector - 

Jamie 


On Sat, May 9, 2020, 3:33 PM Murray Jennex via groups.io <murphjen=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
another reason not to list intellectual capital is that then you have to negotiate pay with the holders of the IC and if the holder sees they are valuable it will raise their asking price....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Pavel Kraus <p.kraus@...>
To: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 5:56 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Are knowledge managers losing jobs right now?

Dear David,

I have attended several Intellectual Capital - Knowledge Management conferences. At one of those, we had a panel discussion with a top executive either from FASB or GAAP. She made a very valid point, which you have under no. 8 bellow.

She said that no company will identify and subsequently put freely and deliberately any unnecessary assets into their balance sheets, which would then trigger the appetite of tax people. I remember that after her statement the spirit of the conference kind of collapsed. Nobody was thinking about this point until that moment. But it is true, there is no interest of companies to pay more taxes.

Pavel

 
Bill -

>
I have always described KM activities and resources, projects and people, as investments, not costs.
>

How do CFOs respond to calling KM efforts “investments?


A bit of background:
(anyone with more current knowledge of accounting practices, please correct me)

I’m looking at this as software & systems for internal use.

By the rules of FASB (Financial Accounting Standards Board) 86 for software systems:
1/ - spending through proof-of-feasibility is expensed
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
3/ - after completion maintenance/repairs are expensed

Obviously these rules do not directly address the inconvenient fact that the bulk of KM work is human work, not tools.


There are a variety of forces in play here.

4/ - Accountants are very conservative.

5/ - They do not like to put hard-to-value resources on the balance sheet.

6/ - The intangible aspect of “goodwill” is an excellent example.  Just look at the Kraft-Heinz fiasco where they had to write down $1.2B in “intangible assets.”  Looks bad.

7/ - If software projects  —  an ERP implementation?  —  were put on the balance sheet, the frequency of such large-scale efforts being cancelled is such that it would look bad to regularly write off large amounts of defective “assets.”  Much safer to just dribble the spend through the income statement as G&A.

8/ - It can potentially be dangerous to have juicy assets on the balance sheet… because eventually the tax man will notice & demand their cut.

9/ - Solid software & process management (aka KM) can become more rather than less valuable over time.


A significant conundrum for double entry bookkeeping.

See: H. Thomas Johnson’s Relevance Lost

- David


David Eddy
 

Correction:

>
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
>

Major CORRECTION:

Shoud be “spending MAY be capitalized”  …and I would argue is more often than not expensed, not capitalized.

Last year I took a look at General Motor’s balance sheet… SYSTEMS were not listed as assets.


However you wish to describe it, the tribal, institutional knowledge and just plain knowledge is increasingly embedded in software applications & processes… flushed invisibly through the income statement.

Except in extraordinary times like today when the scamble is on to CUT spending since income is likely severely, negatively impacted.

- David


Matt Moore <innotecture@...>
 

Hi,

I realize this statement may not please accountants but you only know the value of something when you try to buy or sell it.

Many intangible assets are difficult to get consensus valuations for: https://www.marketingweek.com/what-is-the-point-of-brand-valuations-if-those-doing-the-valuing-are-so-off-target/

This is, in part, because the commercial value of something is not intrinsic within it. It is based on the future value it will deliver. And this is subject to change as our picture of the future changes. For example, recent fluctuations in the price of toilet paper and cruise tickets.

What does this mean for knowledge managers? People will only truly understand your value if they try to sell you or they get rid of you. The typical cycle you see in organisations is they will have some kind of knowledge function (often called something else) run for a number of years. Then they will cut it. Then someone else will restart it 18 months later.

As for calling something an “investment” vs a “cost”, I get the rhetorical intent but everyone does it and it can wear thin after a while. When I sat on procurement panels, vendors would talk about “investments” and I would just mentally change it to “expenses”.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On May 10, 2020, at 1:14 AM, David Eddy <deddy@...> wrote:

Correction:

>
2/ - system construction spending is capitalized & depreciated over 3 years
>

Major CORRECTION:

Shoud be “spending MAY be capitalized”  …and I would argue is more often than not expensed, not capitalized.

Last year I took a look at General Motor’s balance sheet… SYSTEMS were not listed as assets.


However you wish to describe it, the tribal, institutional knowledge and just plain knowledge is increasingly embedded in software applications & processes… flushed invisibly through the income statement.

Except in extraordinary times like today when the scamble is on to CUT spending since income is likely severely, negatively impacted.

- David


Daan Boom
 

Dear SIKM:

I noticed the discussion in this community on the trend of diminishing KM positions or KM units dissolved within organizations. That is a sad observation and I’m waiting for the data of Nick Milton, due in a few weeks, to see if this is a global phenomena. Regardless, in my view businesses in profit and non-profit do need KM. Why? The world is now changing at a rate unprecedented and at which the basic system, structures, and cultures built over the past years cannot keep up with the demand being placed on them. Baby steps to manage and strategize to the new normal are not sufficient and organizations and economies need something very new to stay abreast. In an age of tumultuous change and uncertainties, knowledge management provides organizations the capacities and insights to plan, adapt, and mainstream new concepts of doing business. A KM function and KM processes in place provide a valuable contribution to this process of planning and realignment. Maybe the current environment is a signal to renew and revive KM in organizations?

For the past years CCLFI provides a successful KM practitioners course twice a year but for one reason or another, we see a peak in demand. The 2nd 2020 batch is already fully booked and we decided to schedule a 3rd batch, starting in August. Maybe something to think of during WFH.

Warm regards, and stay safe and healthy.

Daan


Nick Milton
 

Daan, I am sorry, my survey data (which I hope to release in the next 7 days) will not show whether KM posts are diminishing. It does show that the people who answered the survey say that the importance of KM is increasing in their organisations (74%) or not changing (25%). Only 5% say the importance is decreasing.

Also a survey of knowledge posts I did on LinkedIn in January of this year (https://www.nickmilton.com/2020/01/how-many-knowledge-managers-are-there.html) showed that there were 47% more people on LinkedIn with Knowledge roles than there were in late 2014.

None of these statistics above reflect or measure the loss of KM professionals and teams during the pandemic. Only a later analysis will show whether KM lost more professionals than other disciplines did (safety management, risk management, quality management, project management, information management etc). It would be wrong I think, at this moment, to rely only on anecdotal evidence. Lots of people are losing their jobs, not just knowledge managers.

Nick Milton

-----Original Message-----
From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Daan Boom
Sent: 20 May 2020 04:05
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management Course

Dear SIKM:

I noticed the discussion in this community on the trend of diminishing KM positions or KM units dissolved within organizations. That is a sad observation and I’m waiting for the data of Nick Milton, due in a few weeks, to see if this is a global phenomena. Regardless, in my view businesses in profit and non-profit do need KM. Why? The world is now changing at a rate unprecedented and at which the basic system, structures, and cultures built over the past years cannot keep up with the demand being placed on them. Baby steps to manage and strategize to the new normal are not sufficient and organizations and economies need something very new to stay abreast. In an age of tumultuous change and uncertainties, knowledge management provides organizations the capacities and insights to plan, adapt, and mainstream new concepts of doing business. A KM function and KM processes in place provide a valuable contribution to this process of planning and realignment. Maybe the current environment is a signal to renew and revive KM in organizations?

For the past years CCLFI provides a successful KM practitioners course twice a year but for one reason or another, we see a peak in demand. The 2nd 2020 batch is already fully booked and we decided to schedule a 3rd batch, starting in August. Maybe something to think of during WFH.

Warm regards, and stay safe and healthy.

Daan


Daan Boom
 

Thank you Nick:  

Thank you for the clarification. What the report, as well as with your previous surveys, is taking temperature of KM in services and industries organizations, public and private. It may not exactly provide information on lost jobs but it gives a trend as perceived by the responders. The pandemic has revealed key vulnerabilities of industries and will undoubtedly become a number one priority to fix. This aspect may not resonate yet in the survey response but the discussions in this community earlier gives an indication how they perceive the future. Where I see hope is that organizations and nations have to think clearly about the many ways in which our world will be different. The trillions of stimulus dollars governments are borrowing, worries central banks how to keep the debt sustainable. Industries tap on this financial support and with the current low interest rate I don’t see a problem for a repayment but it hinges on a lot of variables. It may lead to creative destruction. The pandemic will likely result in structural sector and organizational calibration, re-allocation, and disrupting value chains build in the last decades. The on going ‘tech war’ between US and China may lead to a split in technology and global value chains. How that will unfold is difficult to predict, What I see as an opportunity for KM is guiding and preparing organizations for the new normal. Digital technology has very quickly become our lifeline, yet many organizations despite their IT maturity status, are not prepared for digital transactions and service delivery and support staff in WFH. I also observe the protests from people who are hating to work from home, and those who lament the end of privacy with the new track- and trace apps. Here are also opportunities for KM pro’s. I do realize that we- or at least a lot of the world’s population- came to a grinding halt and that we all gather in the lower tiers of Maslow hierarchy of needs. Our physiological needs become paramount and shelter and access to food is becoming the focus of our day to day activities. That behavior may take another year or so and will have long lasting effects and social infrastructure adjustments. 
Keep safe and healthy Nick and all SIKM community members.

Daan



On May 20, 2020, at 15:38, Nick Milton <nick.milton@...> wrote:

Daan, I am sorry, my survey data (which I hope to release in the next 7 days) will not show whether KM posts are diminishing. It does show that the people who answered the survey say that the importance of KM is increasing in their organizations (74%) or not changing (25%). Only 5% say the importance is decreasing.

Also a survey of knowledge posts I did on LinkedIn in January of this year (https://www.nickmilton.com/2020/01/how-many-knowledge-managers-are-there.html) showed that there were 47% more people on LinkedIn with Knowledge roles than there were in late 2014.

None of these statistics above reflect or measure the loss of KM professionals and teams during the pandemic. Only a later analysis will show whether KM lost more professionals than other disciplines did (safety management, risk management, quality management, project management, information management etc). It would be wrong I think, at this moment, to rely only on anecdotal evidence. Lots of people are losing their jobs, not just knowledge managers. 

Nick Milton


-----Original Message-----
From: SIKM@groups.io <SIKM@groups.io> On Behalf Of Daan Boom
Sent: 20 May 2020 04:05
To: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge Management Course

Dear SIKM:

I noticed the discussion in this community on the trend of diminishing KM positions or KM units dissolved within organizations. That is a sad observation and I’m waiting for the data of Nick Milton, due in a few weeks, to see if this is a global phenomena. Regardless, in my view businesses in profit and non-profit do need KM. Why? The world is now changing at a rate unprecedented and at which the basic system, structures, and cultures built over the past years cannot keep up with the demand being placed on them. Baby steps to manage and strategize to the new normal are not sufficient and organizations and economies need something very new to stay abreast. In an age of tumultuous change and uncertainties, knowledge management provides organizations the capacities and insights to plan, adapt, and mainstream new concepts of doing business. A KM function and KM processes in place provide a valuable contribution to this process of planning and realignment.  Maybe the current environment is a signal to renew and revive KM in organizations?

For the past years CCLFI provides a successful KM practitioners course twice a year but for one reason or another, we see a peak in demand. The 2nd 2020 batch is already fully booked and we decided to schedule a 3rd batch, starting in August. Maybe something to think of during WFH.

Warm regards, and stay safe and healthy.

Daan








Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 
Edited

Sharing the 2020 Human Capital trends from Deloitte with a trend focused on knowledge management which was great to see called out!  I think it has some great insights around how we as knowledge management professionals can provide value to our organizations.  While technology is making knowledge management more efficient, the ability to tie knowledge efforts to action and creating knowledge to jump start innovations and launch new products and services is where the value lies but it's a big gap today (82% of respondents said their organizations can do better at this). The more we can do to address the gap the more value we show to the business.  Efforts like curating best content to support client teams around the COVID response, capturing stories of how we are showing up for our clients and helping them respond during this crisis,  leveraging community to crowdsource ideas to specific business challenges to come up with ideas for new products/services are a few examples.    You can find the full report here, the KM chapter here.


Daan Boom
 

Dear Stacie:
Thank you for sharing and the trend substantiates opportunities for KM professionals when organizations are preparing for the new normal.

Daan

On May 23, 2020, at 2:31 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote: