Topics

Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #data-science


 

Hi all,
This is my first post on SIKM.  I have worked in KM for 15+ years in Melbourne Australia and did a Masters of KM in the early 2000s.
Two years ago I began working for the Country Fire Authority; a volunteer fire fighting organisation with 53,000 volunteers at 1,219 brigades across the state of Victoria which is the third most dangerous fire state in the world after southern Spain and California.
Our leadership have a great grip on tangible asset management. Fire stations, Trucks, Training and Incident Mgt are all fantastic. But understanding the importance of accumulated experience and local knowledge has never been seriously appreciated or actively managed. As the Head of Knowledge for CFA, my first job has been to help our leaders grasp the nature of this valuable intangible asset. This video is of a presentation I did to the Australian PowerBI Users Group about one of the ways we are making the knowledge of our 50k volunteers visible.
I hope it sparks some thinking for your own organisation.  Always happy to chat about my work and learn from others if you want to reach out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiwzfYmyv6I

Stuart French
Program Mgr, Knowledge
Country Fire Authority (VIC)
stuart.french@...


 

Hi Stu

 

Welcome and good to hear from you down under. Your participation will be valuable for all of us.

 

Stay safe.

 

Bill

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stuart French via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, September 3, 2020 20:51
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #datawrangling

 

Hi all,
This is my first post on SIKM.  I have worked in KM for 15+ years in Melbourne Australia and did a Masters of KM in the early 2000s.
Two years ago I began working for the Country Fire Authority; a volunteer fire fighting organisation with 53,000 volunteers at 1,219 brigades across the state of Victoria which is the third most dangerous fire state in the world after southern Spain and California.
Our leadership have a great grip on tangible asset management. Fire stations, Trucks, Training and Incident Mgt are all fantastic. But understanding the importance of accumulated experience and local knowledge has never been seriously appreciated or actively managed. As the Head of Knowledge for CFA, my first job has been to help our leaders grasp the nature of this valuable intangible asset. This video is of a presentation I did to the Australian PowerBI Users Group about one of the ways we are making the knowledge of our 50k volunteers visible.
I hope it sparks some thinking for your own organisation.  Always happy to chat about my work and learn from others if you want to reach out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kiwzfYmyv6I

Stuart French
Program Mgr, Knowledge
Country Fire Authority (VIC)
stuart.french@...


 

Bill!

Lovely to see a friendly face. My condolences for our mate Mr Calabrese. I’ll miss him and he talked about you a lot. Hope you like the video. 

Stu. 


 

I did.  Look forward to your insights.

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stuart French via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, September 5, 2020 06:32
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #datawrangling

 

Bill!

Lovely to see a friendly face. My condolences for our mate Mr Calabrese. I’ll miss him and he talked about you a lot. Hope you like the video. 

Stu. 


Valdis Krebs
 

Hello Stuart,

Have you tried network analysis to map and measure who seeks out whom for advice, expertise, support, knowledge, etc?

The attached map shows a network of doctors -- the arrows show who seeks out whom for advice/expertise on new pharmaceuticals/prescriptions.  For privacy, names have been replaced by random numbers.

Valdis Krebs

http://orgnet.com/about.html

 

 


Murray Jennex
 

I agree with Valdis and Nancy (exchange tacit).  The Jennex-Olfman KM Success Model includes two constructs related to storing knowledge, one construct focuses on explicit and looks at the accuracy, relevance, and completeness of the knowledge and the other construct deals with tacit where the focus is on capturing who knows the tacit and then providing links to them so that those needing that knowledge can contact the tacit knowledge holder directly.  I've used this approach for over 20 years to manage knowledge in the commercial nuclear industry and for project teams, many of them virtual teams.  I've used network analysis as Valdis suggests to find out who people go to when they need to know something, and I've focused on putting the tacit knowledge in motion so it is exchanged rather than actually trying to capture it.  I have some articles on this if you like....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Valdis Krebs via groups.io <orgnet9@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Sep 7, 2020 11:25 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #datawrangling

Hello Stuart,

Have you tried network analysis to map and measure who seeks out whom for advice, expertise, support, knowledge, etc?
The attached map shows a network of doctors -- the arrows show who seeks out whom for advice/expertise on new pharmaceuticals/prescriptions.  For privacy, names have been replaced by random numbers.
Valdis Krebs
 
 


 

Thanks Valdis and Murray. 
I have used SNA before and did consider it, but at CFA, 80% of work is phone/paper based so there is no accessible data on connections. I have been restricted in terms of access to observing local practice and them completely cut out because of COVID restrictions. In any case, manually mapping interactions would be impossible given 53,000 volunteers across 1,219 brigades.
I am left with few options so I have joined a volunteer brigade myself (have done the 7 month training and done 10 call outs now) so I can understand the types on knowledge the brigades deal with, where the gaps are and most importantly getting a feel for the amazing mentoring culture at our brigades.  This has been really worth the investment and also given me a bit of credibility with the operations people who have little time for office workers telling them how to do their job :)

Valdis, do you have any ideas about data collection in this environment to build the SNA off?  I wanted to get access to the phone records but got a hard NO due to union issues.  Also, given the highly transactional nature of emergency management, most of those calls will be to communicate or hand-over incident information, not pass on knowledge or solve problems.

Murray, I follow a similar approach and have two projects underway at the moment: Knowledge Hub for people to access explicit info and Knowledge Web for people to flow, identify and connect with tacit knowledge.

Thanks for your feedback!
Stu


Murray Jennex
 

in the late 90s and early 2000s I used a short and simple questionnaire that simply asked who you go to when you need to know something.  This was on paper but you could do online now and collect the responses and map out who the gate keepers are I would think fairly easily....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart French <stuart@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Sep 7, 2020 6:46 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #datawrangling

Thanks Valdis and Murray. 
I have used SNA before and did consider it, but at CFA, 80% of work is phone/paper based so there is no accessible data on connections. I have been restricted in terms of access to observing local practice and them completely cut out because of COVID restrictions. In any case, manually mapping interactions would be impossible given 53,000 volunteers across 1,219 brigades.
I am left with few options so I have joined a volunteer brigade myself (have done the 7 month training and done 10 call outs now) so I can understand the types on knowledge the brigades deal with, where the gaps are and most importantly getting a feel for the amazing mentoring culture at our brigades.  This has been really worth the investment and also given me a bit of credibility with the operations people who have little time for office workers telling them how to do their job :)

Valdis, do you have any ideas about data collection in this environment to build the SNA off?  I wanted to get access to the phone records but got a hard NO due to union issues.  Also, given the highly transactional nature of emergency management, most of those calls will be to communicate or hand-over incident information, not pass on knowledge or solve problems.

Murray, I follow a similar approach and have two projects underway at the moment: Knowledge Hub for people to access explicit info and Knowledge Web for people to flow, identify and connect with tacit knowledge.

Thanks for your feedback!
Stu


 

Thanks Murray.  One of our volunteers recently complained he had been hit by 18 separate surveys since COVID began.  All from different people and levels of the organisation.  Our people are well and truly surveyed out. I need a way to passively determine these connections which in a non-digital workplace is proving difficult.


Murray Jennex
 

do you have phone records? can you see which internal phone numbers get the most internal calls? (i.e. I know this won't work if everyone is using their own phones) but it would seem that a non digital workplace would have some means of seeing who people are talking to, perhaps talk to the mail room and see who is getting the most paper requests? Of if people are using chat on computers to talk perhaps track traffic to employee ids?  You have an interesting problem, it will require some out of the box thinking but I think it can be done...murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart French <stuart@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, Sep 7, 2020 8:36 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Making Intangible knowledge visible to traditional leaders #datawrangling

Thanks Murray.  One of our volunteers recently complained he had been hit by 18 separate surveys since COVID began.  All from different people and levels of the organisation.  Our people are well and truly surveyed out. I need a way to passively determine these connections which in a non-digital workplace is proving difficult.


 

Hi Murray,
I'd be interested in viewing any articles you'd like to share here also Murray.


Valdis Krebs
 

>> Valdis, do you have any ideas about data collection in this environment to build the SNA off?  I wanted to get access to the phone records but got a hard NO due to union issues.  Also, given the highly transactional nature of emergency management, most of those calls will be to communicate or hand-over incident information, not pass on knowledge or solve problems.

There are ways to collect data and keep it private/anonymous.  It all depends on what you have.  But if an organization does not want to hand over data, then there is not much you can do.

Think about whether there are any “proxy networks” available that will give you insight into the organization without revealing anyone’s identity.  Like the attached network map … it is based on actual Amazon purchase data, but none of their customer's identities are revealed.  Yet we see emergent group behavior.  How can this metaphor be used in your situation?

Valdis


Leif Edvinsson
 

Could it be successsors  to Cambridge Analytica? 

tis 8 sep. 2020 kl. 18:26 skrev Valdis Krebs via groups.io <orgnet9=yahoo.com@groups.io>:

>> Valdis, do you have any ideas about data collection in this environment to build the SNA off?  I wanted to get access to the phone records but got a hard NO due to union issues.  Also, given the highly transactional nature of emergency management, most of those calls will be to communicate or hand-over incident information, not pass on knowledge or solve problems.

There are ways to collect data and keep it private/anonymous.  It all depends on what you have.  But if an organization does not want to hand over data, then there is not much you can do.

Think about whether there are any “proxy networks” available that will give you insight into the organization without revealing anyone’s identity.  Like the attached network map … it is based on actual Amazon purchase data, but none of their customer's identities are revealed.  Yet we see emergent group behavior.  How can this metaphor be used in your situation?

Valdis








Valdis Krebs
 
Edited

Yeah Leif, Cambridge Analytica, GRU, or NSA … take your pick. 😏


Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Valdis

I’ve been following your Amazon book mapping activities for as long as you’ve been doing them. They do paint a persistent and persuasive picture. However the other day, I wondered how you would know whether the data behind the maps is contaminated - do you have good insight into how Amazon's algorithm works for its suggestions? For example, do you know whether it is simply driven by “people who bought also bought” or are the results further tuned by topic categorisation putting “like” books together - hence accentuating the separation effect?

Do you have any insight into this?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 9 Sep 2020, at 12:26 AM, Valdis Krebs via groups.io <orgnet9@...> wrote:

>> Valdis, do you have any ideas about data collection in this environment to build the SNA off?  I wanted to get access to the phone records but got a hard NO due to union issues.  Also, given the highly transactional nature of emergency management, most of those calls will be to communicate or hand-over incident information, not pass on knowledge or solve problems.

There are ways to collect data and keep it private/anonymous.  It all depends on what you have.  But if an organization does not want to hand over data, then there is not much you can do.

Think about whether there are any “proxy networks” available that will give you insight into the organization without revealing anyone’s identity.  Like the attached network map … it is based on actual Amazon purchase data, but none of their customer's identities are revealed.  Yet we see emergent group behavior.  How can this metaphor be used in your situation?

Valdis

<July12020Polemics.png>


Valdis Krebs
 

Hi Patrick,

When I started doing these maps, in the early 2000s, I did speak to Andreas Weigand who was CTO at Amazon at the time.  He did explain that Amazon did list books in descending order of co-sales in the their "also bought lists".  He was Amazon's early data guy and helped set up all of their data analysis systems.  He has since left the company.  So, who knows if his original work has been changed.  Just from the data patterns I see, I don't sense any major changes.  If you look on Twitter or Facebook or the blogosphere... this pattern of strong red vs. blue clusters persists from a whole variety of researchers looking at a variety of social data sets.  I wrote a peer-reviewed paper on this process: https://journals.openedition.org/bms/1289

Enjoy!

Valdis 


Valdis Krebs
 

Although we started talking about intangible knowledge, may I expand the conversation to "emergent knowledge"? Attached is a network map from earlier this year of medical researchers and scientists who came together to fight Covid-19.  This data is from the public data base -- PubMed -- which lists all published, peer-reviewed papers in various medical fields.  Two people/nodes are connected if they were co-authors on a paper together.  Some relationships are stronger than others, but we do not show the thickness of the link for easy of reading. The node colors have no meaning here, but could be used to designate: country, medical speciality, organization, etc.  What is amazing is that this network formed in the first half of 2020.  Sure some of these people probably knew each other and had worked together prior to Covid, but this is the shape of the main component focused on the topic of Covid-19.  Unlike the politicians, who did not unite around this virus, scientists came together and freely shared their findings to beat the disease.

 


Patrick Lambe
 

Thanks Valdis, I agree the maps show a great deal of consistency so it seems fair to assume the underlying data collection is consistent. Thank you so much for the link to the paper, much appreciated!

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 9 Sep 2020, at 10:43 PM, Valdis Krebs via groups.io <orgnet9@...> wrote:

Hi Patrick,

When I started doing these maps, in the early 2000s, I did speak to Andreas Weigand who was CTO at Amazon at the time.  He did explain that Amazon did list books in descending order of co-sales in the their "also bought lists".  He was Amazon's early data guy and helped set up all of their data analysis systems.  He has since left the company.  So, who knows if his original work has been changed.  Just from the data patterns I see, I don't sense any major changes.  If you look on Twitter or Facebook or the blogosphere... this pattern of strong red vs. blue clusters persists from a whole variety of researchers looking at a variety of social data sets.  I wrote a peer-reviewed paper on this process: https://journals.openedition.org/bms/1289

Enjoy!

Valdis