WEBINAR - Trolling in Chinese and English - Research Findings #webinar


Matt Moore
 


Online trolling can be a minor annoyance, a life-threatening nightmare or even a danger to our public institutions. But what are its causes, its true effects, and what can and should we do about it? In this seminar, three experts examine trolling from different perspectives and across cultures (with a focus on Australia and China):
- How does trolling behaviour play out in different environments?
- What drives trolls from a psychological perspective?
- How does trolling relate to freedom of speech issues?

Huixin Tian is a Doctoral student in the Department of Information and Library Science at Indiana University Bloomington. She has conducted extensive research into trolling in online Chinese language environments.

Evita March obtained her PhD in evolutionary and social psychology and is currently employed as a senior lecturer and researcher at Federation University Australia. Evita’s research interests include interpersonal relationships, cyberpsychology, and personality. In particular, Evita is interested in how people behave online, and she has explored a range of online behaviours including cyberbullying, cyberstalking, online dating, trolling, and self-presentation.

Dr. Jay Daniel Thompson is a Lecturer in Professional Communication in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University. He is researching the fraught relationship between trolling and freedom of speech. Dr. Thompson has also published extensively on the politics and ethics of media controversy.


Matt Moore
 

Some discussions around trolling, content moderation and culture that
will be useful to anyone working in these domains.

Evita March - The Psychology of Internet Trolling: https://youtu.be/i5qkZ369MPI
Huixin Tian - “I'm in the center of the vortex”: Mapping the
experience of trolling victims: https://youtu.be/RJOHCbvj6BQ
Jay Daniel Thompson - Is Trolling Freedom of Speech?:
https://youtu.be/To4bPIGiXzE
Speaker Panel: https://youtu.be/zR5xcr0ggOQ

Online trolling can be a minor annoyance, a life-threatening nightmare
or even a danger to our public institutions. But what are its causes,
its true effects, and what can and should we do about it? In this
seminar, three experts examine trolling from different perspectives
and across cultures (with a focus on Australia and China):
- How does trolling behaviour play out in different environments?
- What drives trolls from a psychological perspective?
- How does trolling relate to freedom of speech issues?

Evita March obtained her PhD in evolutionary and social psychology and
is currently employed as a senior lecturer and researcher at
Federation University Australia. Evita’s research interests include
interpersonal relationships, cyberpsychology, and personality. In
particular, Evita is interested in how people behave online, and she
has explored a range of online behaviours including cyberbullying,
cyberstalking, online dating, trolling, and self-presentation.

Huixin Tian is a PhD student in Information Science, Department of
Information and Library Science, Indiana University Bloomington. She
received a bachelor’s degree in archaeology from Peking University,
and a master’s degree in Anthropology from Indiana University
Bloomington. Her research interests include materiality of digital
mediation, virtuality and work, immigrant labor in the global
information industry, and innovation industry. Her dissertation
project will focus on the community of Chinese immigrant programmers
in the United States.

Dr. Jay Daniel Thompson is a Lecturer in Professional Communication in
the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University. He is
researching the fraught relationship between trolling and freedom of
speech. Dr. Thompson has also published extensively on the politics
and ethics of media controversy.