October 2020 SIKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #monthly-call #emotions


Stan Garfield
 

Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, 
Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be 
More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & EmotionThe call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:
  • Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
  • How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
  • How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call


Matt Moore
 

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@gmail.com> wrote:

Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar

--
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@innotecture.com.au


Patrick Lambe
 

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others). I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this.

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:

Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar





-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




Stan Garfield
 

TO: SIKM Leaders Community

Yesterday we held our 182nd monthly call. 
Thanks to Matt for presenting, to those who asked questions and made comments, and to all those who attended.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt discussed:
  • Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
  • How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
  • How to design products and programs that account for emotion
Please continue the discussion here by replying to this thread. Here are the details of the call:
Zoom Chat
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:00 PM Morning All!
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:01 PM Hi all! Got coffee now :)
From Jannene Kyytsonen to Everyone:  05:01 PM good Morning from Sydney Australia
From Kelley Doyle to Everyone:  05:02 PM Good evening from New England in the USA
From Heather Fox to Everyone:  05:02 PM Hello from Delaware, USA
From Nuria Yo to Everyone:  05:02 PM hi from Barcelona. night here
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:03 PM Will there be a transcript available?
From Joel Muzard to Everyone:  05:03 PM Joel Muzard from Montreal
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:04 PM If there's not a transcript from the sound recording, then otter.ai can probably work with the recording :)
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:04 PM Hi all from Canberra, Australia where it's a very civilised hour!
From sswasu@... to Everyone:  05:05 PM morning all
From Retha to Everyone:  05:05 PM Hi from Randburg, South Africa :)
From Matthew Moore to Everyone:  05:05 PM https://www.menti.com/ code 1965677
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:09 PM Greetings from New York City!
From Stan Garfield to Everyone:  05:09 PM Matthew Moore: Profiles in Knowledge https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/matthew-moore-profiles-knowledge-stan-garfield/
From sswasu@... to Everyone:  05:09 PM greetings from Abu Dhabi, UAE!
From Cory Cannon to Everyone:  05:10 PM Greetings from the great state of Texas
From Stan Garfield to Everyone:  05:13 PM Discussion in SIKM Leaders Community https://sikm.groups.io/g/main/topic/77128586
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:15 PM Thanks Stan. So pleased to be "in the same room" as you after some years of interacting with you and reading your work.
From Soli Le-Masurier to Everyone:  05:16 PM The biggest link I can see (for me) is that as we are 'enabling' then we can have strong emotions attached to our work to make sure we are enabling 'correctly' or 'impactfully' or more common for me - getting frustrated when someone wants to interrupt my approach
From St Patrick's Episcopal Church to Everyone:  05:17 PM infinite
From Mary Abraham to Everyone:  05:17 PM Infinite!
From Kelley Doyle to Everyone:  05:17 PM 12
From Plato to Everyone:  05:17 PM 547823
From John Hovell to Everyone:  05:17 PM only constrained by language :)
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:17 PM As many as there are people
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:17 PM Hundreds
From Michael Olsson to Everyone:  05:17 PM It depends on what language you are using
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:17 PM 1
From Dave Frank to Everyone:  05:18 PM I've seen it and it is a great movie for all ages.
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:20 PM Emotions are a body-mind construct, individually interpreted and unique
From Michael Olsson to Everyone:  05:20 PM Anyone who is sceptical about emotion is a cultural construct should take a flight from Helsinki to Rome! :-)
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:21 PM Hume
From Bill Kaplan to Everyone:  05:21 PM Robbie
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:21 PM I knew the robot :)
From Jannene Kyytsonen to Everyone:  05:22 PM Where are most of the emotion reading problems from, gender or race basis ?
From Bill Kaplan to Everyone:  05:22 PM Yes
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:22 PM For the Aussies in the room, Hume reminded me a lot of Barnaby J
From Jannene Kyytsonen to Everyone:  05:23 PM No, still true in Finland
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:23 PM Yes, @joanne Jacobs :(
From Kelley Doyle to Everyone:  05:27 PM That's hilarious - this book is next to my desk right now, I'm on page 100. Good to know I'm on the right track. :-)
From Soli Le-Masurier to Everyone:  05:28 PM Often both the user side and admin side are terrible, or only the user side is reasonable
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:28 PM My systems are not and it is a problem  - people tell me it is boring and unexciting. Am working on design a lot more now.
From Kelley Doyle to Everyone:  05:29 PM @Soli, agree, my last KB was a nightmare to work in.
From Soli Le-Masurier to Everyone:  05:31 PM And then unfortunately demotivating for the admins and un-enticing for the users
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:33 PM Hahahah
From Jannene Kyytsonen to Everyone:  05:37 PM Try the space industry where there is a mix of military, business and academia- different cultures and inclinations to share and co-create
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:37 PM That would be a delicate, fine dance, Jannene!
From Abhijit to Everyone:  05:47 PM @ Stan & Alison will share my story some other day
From St Patrick's Episcopal Church to Everyone:  05:47 PM LOLOL
From Zoe C to Everyone:  05:47 PM I ended up talking to myself...
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:47 PM We had a great convo — but off topic
From Mon Lukas to Everyone:  05:47 PM There is never enough caffeine to support a breakout!
From Hilary Yerbury Australia to Everyone:  05:48 PM One of our group brought up the difference between emotion in the workplace and emotion in KM
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:48 PM HI Abhijit - sounds like every Knowledge Manager has challenges with colleague's emotions, which is a relief to hear!!
From Jooste, Adriaan to Everyone:  05:48 PM We had a great discussion - connecting on topics of similarity and difference, high energy and positive emotion was then created by connecting on who we knew in common. Not the exact assignment - but fun!
From Abhijit to Everyone:  05:48 PM @ Alison thank for sharing experience and yes I absolutely agree
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:48 PM I was interested in the issue of responding to people who struggle to emote - such as people with ASD.
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:49 PM I am a former psychologist, so I may factor emotions in just as a matter of course
From Joanne Jacobs to Everyone:  05:50 PM I'm not against breakouts AT ALL - LOVE THEM! but I have to go as I have tradespeople pulling up outside my house RIGHT NOW! Thank you Matt! Thank you Stan!!!
From Hilary Yerbury Australia to Everyone:  05:57 PM Tim, Good to know, things have been rough in NYC
From Rosemary Sempell to Everyone:  05:58 PM great to chat with NY, South Africa and Australia in our room
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:59 PM I am right on the Hudson River, where there is lots of fresh air and sunshine!
From Jooste, Adriaan to Everyone:  05:59 PM This was very insightful - thanks!
From Retha to Everyone:  05:59 PM Great session, thanks Matt et al.
From John Hovell to Everyone:  05:59 PM much appreciated as always Matt, thanks!!
From Mary Abraham to Everyone:  05:59 PM Thanks so much, Matt!
From AlisonJ to Everyone:  05:59 PM Thanks so much everyone - what a great discussion.
From Zoe C to Everyone:  05:59 PM Thank you :)
From Soli Le-Masurier to Everyone:  05:59 PM :)
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  05:59 PM Great session, Matt.  The second breakout didn’t work FYI.  Thanks!!!
From Abhijit to Everyone:  05:59 PM @ Vittoria & Alison it was really enlightening & listen to your experience
From Mary Abraham to Everyone:  05:59 PM Loved the international nature of this meeting.
From Jacinta Byrne to Everyone:  05:59 PM Thanks all!
From Dave Frank to Everyone:  06:00 PM Thanks Matt. Very exciting.
From Abhijit to Everyone:  06:00 PM Thanks everyone
From Tim Wood Powell to Everyone:  06:00 PM Very interesting and helpful.


Robert L. Bogue
 

Matt, I too am sorry to have missed the live conversation but was able to watch the recording today.  I had a few thoughts.

 

  1. I liked the introduction of design thinking into the discussion but it caused me to be curious about the relationship between aesthetics and emotion.  I don’t typically think about design thinking as an aspect of emotion – though I know that V.S. Ramachandran speaks of how sculptures include exaggerated proportions to elicit emotions.
  2. I was further intrigued by the state of KM and whether we give greater consideration than the general public to the consumption of information / knowledge rather than it’s storage.  In my work with information architecture this is a recurring theme that I have to work with clients on… “How is this for the person consuming it?”
  3. I was also pondering the idea that what we store in a system is explicit knowledge and therefore context-less.  However, emotions are necessarily context-connected.  I wonder if the nature of converting knowledge into a KM system necessarily reduces the amount of emotion in it.  (Your comment about academic journals and emotion was humorous to me because I find academic writing very painful.)

 

Patrick, with regard to your final point, I was triggered to think about Francis Fukuyam’s work in Trust: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/02/27/book-review-trust-human-nature-reconstitution-social-order/) In it he explains how trust is experienced differently in different cultures.  Basically the trust (and commitment) is focused in different areas between self, family, and state.  I recognize the relationship between personal experiences and culture and how these might influence emotions, however, I wonder what degree of influence they might have.  Do you have a sense for how much of a person’s emotion might be driven by culture?

 

Good discussions.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:28 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] October 19 SiKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #emotions #monthlycall

 

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

 

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others). I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this.

 

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

 

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

 

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

 

On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <
stangarfield@...> wrote:


Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...



 


Matt Moore
 


Patrick,

Thank you for your comments.

1. Metacognition / Intelligence / Labour

“I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this” - do say more.

I get what you are saying about the labour vs intelligence distinction. I was actually a little nervous about referencing “emotional labour” because its original use had a strong class dimension. It was all about the invisible work required of low status service jobs (typically occupied by working-class women). I’m not sure if KM fits in that category. And as I noted, my response to “emotional intelligence” are now as complex and capacious as the term itself has become. That said, I agree that “labour” rather than “intelligence“ (which is often discussed as tho it were innate) is more fruitful.

2. That’s an interesting read of the word clouds. As my exchange with Stan indicated, it’s from the academic literature not the direct words of practitioners, so we need to interpret with caution (I’m also unsure how much such results are artifacts of their mining process). I would also be interested in the comments of others on this - and on that paper as a whole (it’s only 10 pages).

3. The emotions and culture thing is explored extensively in the early chapters of Barrett’s book. And I think she would agree with you that this relationship is reflexive and two-way.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Oct 20, 2020, at 5:28 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others)..

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:

Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar





-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




Matt Moore
 

Hi Robert,

Good to keep the conversation going.

1. Emotion & Design

I would definitely recommend the Don Norman book (and also Patrick Jordan’s work on pleasurable design). If you look at the work of IDEO, a lot of their focus on empathy is actually about trying communicate and comprehend emotional states. And mood boards are very much a thing in design.

I think part of the issue might be that “design thinking” as sold (esp. by the big, trad consultancies rather than the specialist design shops) is actually often a caricature of design practices - and leaves out some of the icky emotional stuff as not being business-y enough.

2. Consumption. Maybe? Would you care to say more about that?

3. Removal of emotional context in explicit knowledge

I think I broadly agree - altho I would say that we try to remove emotion from it (“emotion laundering” if you will). You often find traces of emotion in there. And in laundering, you might actually change some of the nature of the knowledge itself. And I think this is often done without weighing of the costs / benefits of doing so.


4. Fukuyama - I thought “Trust” was an interesting book (and he is a more interesting writer than often given for). I tried to use it to explain to Oracle execs why Microsoft would hit us hard in the database markets about 15 years ago - but that’s another story.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Oct 20, 2020, at 11:01 PM, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



Matt, I too am sorry to have missed the live conversation but was able to watch the recording today.  I had a few thoughts.

 

  1. I liked the introduction of design thinking into the discussion but it caused me to be curious about the relationship between aesthetics and emotion.  I don’t typically think about design thinking as an aspect of emotion – though I know that V.S. Ramachandran speaks of how sculptures include exaggerated proportions to elicit emotions.
  2. I was further intrigued by the state of KM and whether we give greater consideration than the general public to the consumption of information / knowledge rather than it’s storage.  In my work with information architecture this is a recurring theme that I have to work with clients on… “How is this for the person consuming it?”
  3. I was also pondering the idea that what we store in a system is explicit knowledge and therefore context-less.  However, emotions are necessarily context-connected.  I wonder if the nature of converting knowledge into a KM system necessarily reduces the amount of emotion in it.  (Your comment about academic journals and emotion was humorous to me because I find academic writing very painful.)

 

Patrick, with regard to your final point, I was triggered to think about Francis Fukuyam’s work in Trust: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/02/27/book-review-trust-human-nature-reconstitution-social-order/) In it he explains how trust is experienced differently in different cultures.  Basically the trust (and commitment) is focused in different areas between self, family, and state.  I recognize the relationship between personal experiences and culture and how these might influence emotions, however, I wonder what degree of influence they might have.  Do you have a sense for how much of a person’s emotion might be driven by culture?

 

Good discussions.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:28 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] October 19 SiKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #emotions #monthlycall

 

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

 

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others). I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this.

 

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

 

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

 

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

<image001.jpg>

 

On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <
stangarfield@...> wrote:


Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...



 


Robert L. Bogue
 

Matt  -

 

Re: Emotion/Design – Yea, I’ve seen some of IDEO’s work and the Kelley brother’s writing.  However, I’m still not sold on the connection – other than as explained below.  I think aesthetics and emotion aren’t the same.  I agree “design thinking as sold” is sort of like McDonald’s “arch” brand a few years ago that was supposed to appeal to adults and more refined tastes… it was still mass produced – and had to be.  As a result the quality bar couldn’t be maintained.  I tend to think that large organizations try to ensure consistency and therefore can’t maintain quality.  Sort of like Harrison Burgeron by Kurt Vonnegut.

 

Re: Consumption – In information architecture and intranet design people want to optimize for the creator experience.  We want to make it easy for people to store things in the system.  However, this is necessarily in opposition to making it best for the consumer.  For instance, yesterday, I had a customer (who is good at this by the way) dump users who were looking for corporate branding resources into a file system.  The experience when they would land there is “um, where am I?” so I had to coach him that a bit of work on a landing page that pointed to the same assets would be valuable.  It’s a mindset shift to think about how do I make this easier for others.

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Matt Moore via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 1:24 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] October 19 SIKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #emotions #monthlycall

 

Hi Robert,

 

Good to keep the conversation going.

 

1. Emotion & Design

 

I would definitely recommend the Don Norman book (and also Patrick Jordan’s work on pleasurable design). If you look at the work of IDEO, a lot of their focus on empathy is actually about trying communicate and comprehend emotional states. And mood boards are very much a thing in design.

 

I think part of the issue might be that “design thinking” as sold (esp. by the big, trad consultancies rather than the specialist design shops) is actually often a caricature of design practices - and leaves out some of the icky emotional stuff as not being business-y enough.

 

2. Consumption. Maybe? Would you care to say more about that?

 

3. Removal of emotional context in explicit knowledge

 

I think I broadly agree - altho I would say that we try to remove emotion from it (“emotion laundering” if you will). You often find traces of emotion in there. And in laundering, you might actually change some of the nature of the knowledge itself. And I think this is often done without weighing of the costs / benefits of doing so.


4. Fukuyama - I thought “Trust” was an interesting book (and he is a more interesting writer than often given for). I tried to use it to explain to Oracle execs why Microsoft would hit us hard in the database markets about 15 years ago - but that’s another story.

 

Regards,

 

Matt Moore

+61 423 784 504



On Oct 20, 2020, at 11:01 PM, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



Matt, I too am sorry to have missed the live conversation but was able to watch the recording today.  I had a few thoughts.

 

  1. I liked the introduction of design thinking into the discussion but it caused me to be curious about the relationship between aesthetics and emotion.  I don’t typically think about design thinking as an aspect of emotion – though I know that V.S. Ramachandran speaks of how sculptures include exaggerated proportions to elicit emotions.
  2. I was further intrigued by the state of KM and whether we give greater consideration than the general public to the consumption of information / knowledge rather than it’s storage.  In my work with information architecture this is a recurring theme that I have to work with clients on… “How is this for the person consuming it?”
  3. I was also pondering the idea that what we store in a system is explicit knowledge and therefore context-less.  However, emotions are necessarily context-connected.  I wonder if the nature of converting knowledge into a KM system necessarily reduces the amount of emotion in it.  (Your comment about academic journals and emotion was humorous to me because I find academic writing very painful.)

 

Patrick, with regard to your final point, I was triggered to think about Francis Fukuyam’s work in Trust: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/02/27/book-review-trust-human-nature-reconstitution-social-order/) In it he explains how trust is experienced differently in different cultures.  Basically the trust (and commitment) is focused in different areas between self, family, and state.  I recognize the relationship between personal experiences and culture and how these might influence emotions, however, I wonder what degree of influence they might have.  Do you have a sense for how much of a person’s emotion might be driven by culture?

 

Good discussions.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:28 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] October 19 SiKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #emotions #monthlycall

 

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

 

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others). I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this.

 

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

 

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

 

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

 

P

 

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

<image001.jpg>

 

On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <
stangarfield@...> wrote:



Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar





-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...




 


Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Matt

Metacognition:
The basic idea of metacognition is that if we can become aware of how we think, we can change the way we think. This is one of the key rationales for conducting cognitive task analysis - by understanding the mechanics of an experienced person’s sense making and decision making, apart from giving a pathway to teaching some of those mechanics to others, that experienced person can become more self aware and deliberate about how they think. I know just from conducting CTA interviews, I become more aware of how I direct my thinking.

I believe the same principle applies in relation to the emotional side of the house. “Uh-oh, he’s pressing my buttons again, I can feel my blood pressure going up, time for me to make a joke to ease the tension” 

Invisible work:
I’m intrigued by your comments. Coincidentally I’ve written part of a chapter on why it’s so important to “see” invisible work in knowledge management, because when we don’t see it, and then move to digitalise that work, we design for unreal environments. Nursing, for example, is full of invisible “bridging the gaps” labour, but when designed systems ignore it, the result can be (a) new (unmanaged) improvisations outside the system to get the ignored work done or (b) errors and safety issues propagate through the system because the error-spotting opportunities previously present in that invisible work have been excised. Actually any roles that involve flexible coordination and adjustment across functions (such as project management) have large amounts of invisible work. Davina Allen’s The Invisible Work of Nurses is a great place to start.

Word Clouds:
Yes my point was that the research literature (not to mention the practitioner conference and magazine material) has very little on failure.

Barrett on Emotions and Culture:
I’m trying so hard not to pick up a new book to read right now. You are a bad man.

P


Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 21 Oct 2020, at 1:08 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:


Patrick,

Thank you for your comments.

1. Metacognition / Intelligence / Labour

“I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this” - do say more.

I get what you are saying about the labour vs intelligence distinction. I was actually a little nervous about referencing “emotional labour” because its original use had a strong class dimension. It was all about the invisible work required of low status service jobs (typically occupied by working-class women). I’m not sure if KM fits in that category. And as I noted, my response to “emotional intelligence” are now as complex and capacious as the term itself has become. That said, I agree that “labour” rather than “intelligence“ (which is often discussed as tho it were innate) is more fruitful.

2. That’s an interesting read of the word clouds. As my exchange with Stan indicated, it’s from the academic literature not the direct words of practitioners, so we need to interpret with caution (I’m also unsure how much such results are artifacts of their mining process). I would also be interested in the comments of others on this - and on that paper as a whole (it’s only 10 pages).

3. The emotions and culture thing is explored extensively in the early chapters of Barrett’s book. And I think she would agree with you that this relationship is reflexive and two-way.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Oct 20, 2020, at 5:28 PM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:

Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 

I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:

1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others)..

2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.

3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.

Thanks again for opening up this discussion.

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com

<SK18th_Anniv2020_emailfooter (2).jpg>

On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:

Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar





-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...





Patrick Lambe
 

Hi Rob

>>Do you have a sense for how much of a person’s emotion might be driven by culture?

I was thinking mainly about team and organisational culture as distinct from national culture. If culture is an emergent property of groups at different scales, then I think there is a huge effect/affect.

I have worked in organisations and periods where I just hated going to work because of the atmosphere and patterns of behaviour (when I found myself becoming cynical I decided it was time to leave). I have worked in organisations and periods where despite the challenges and periodic conflicts there was a basic sense of togetherness and trust that made the energy of the place positive. Now certainly some elements came from the qualities of leadership, but in most cases I can recall the emotional impact of the culture seemed more diffuse than the emotional impact generated by leadership. And the chemistry of a team (and the culture it generates) can be disproportionately affected by the emotional contributions of even a single team member: whether gloom and doom or bring it on.

I think the basic distinction when it comes to culture is Matt’s distinction between an emotion as a transient feeling and a mood. Cultures I think generate/evoke repeated emotions that can become prevailing moods. 

Does that clarify?

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 20 Oct 2020, at 8:00 PM, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Matt, I too am sorry to have missed the live conversation but was able to watch the recording today.  I had a few thoughts.
 
  1. I liked the introduction of design thinking into the discussion but it caused me to be curious about the relationship between aesthetics and emotion.  I don’t typically think about design thinking as an aspect of emotion – though I know that V.S. Ramachandran speaks of how sculptures include exaggerated proportions to elicit emotions.
  2. I was further intrigued by the state of KM and whether we give greater consideration than the general public to the consumption of information / knowledge rather than it’s storage.  In my work with information architecture this is a recurring theme that I have to work with clients on… “How is this for the person consuming it?”
  3. I was also pondering the idea that what we store in a system is explicit knowledge and therefore context-less.  However, emotions are necessarily context-connected.  I wonder if the nature of converting knowledge into a KM system necessarily reduces the amount of emotion in it.  (Your comment about academic journals and emotion was humorous to me because I find academic writing very painful.)
 
Patrick, with regard to your final point, I was triggered to think about Francis Fukuyam’s work in Trust: Human Nature and the Reconstitution of Social Order (https://thorprojects.com/blog/archive/2017/02/27/book-review-trust-human-nature-reconstitution-social-order/) In it he explains how trust is experienced differently in different cultures.  Basically the trust (and commitment) is focused in different areas between self, family, and state.  I recognize the relationship between personal experiences and culture and how these might influence emotions, however, I wonder what degree of influence they might have.  Do you have a sense for how much of a person’s emotion might be driven by culture?
 
Good discussions.
 
Rob
 
-------------------
Robert L. Bogue
O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog
Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com
Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick Lambe via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:28 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] October 19 SiKM Call: Matt Moore - More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion #emotions #monthlycall
 
Really enjoyed the recording Matt, sorry to have missed the live session. 
 
I was thinking about some interesting directions this topic might develop in after reviewing your session:
 
1. On the David Hume quote that reason is the slave of the passions, I would be interested in a discussion of the role of metacognition (understanding how we think) in helping us manage (or better a better word might be influence) our emotions (and reasoning) - which to me sits somewhere between emotional intelligence and Gary Klein’s work in naturalistic decision making and cognitive task analysis. I think this is connected with your discussion of “emotional labour” and is actually a more expressive concept than "emotional intelligence”. We do have to work on ourselves to become better at influencing our own emotions as well as others, and moderating some of the negative effects of poorly managed emotions (in self and others). I think the notion of metacognition offers some tools towards this.
 
2. Your Hornung et al 2020 word cloud slide suggested to me that the KM community (as represented in the research literature) shows a lot more coalescence around positive emotions (meaning several positive concepts turned up a lot), whereas for negative emotions, there were far fewer common emotions and a much wider diversity of individualistic emotional expressions. I’m tempted to think that this is because we are not good at discussing our failures in public, so we are isolated in failure and only publicly united in success. I wonder what other folks think about this.
 
3. You touched briefly on some of the connections between emotion and culture (how culture influences emotions). I think the relationship between the two is reflexive and two-way (meaning that particular emotions or moods can also come to dominate culture) and I think it would be really interesting to explore different scales of emotional influence (personal, team and organisational) and how they interact with culture. I’m not suggesting we can easily have that discussion here, but you commented that the research on emotions in KM is limited, and could do with more attention - I thought this was a potentially productive area to explore.
 
Thanks again for opening up this discussion.
 
P
 
Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:                                                    +65 98528511

web:                                                       www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:                                             www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:           www.aithinsoftware.com

<image001.jpg>
 
On 20 Oct 2020, at 6:46 AM, Matt Moore <matt@...> wrote:
 
Hi all,

Many thanks to those who participated.

Video recording is here: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tanVYgiXv5U
(I'll be adding references and other links)

Regards,

Matt

On Mon, Oct 19, 2020 at 11:24 PM Stan Garfield <
stangarfield@...> wrote:


Reminder: New day and time. This is a reminder of today's monthly call from 5-6 pm EDT.

This month's call will be held on a special day and time. Our speaker, Matt Moore, would like to include fellow Australians. So the call will start at 5:00 pm US EDT on Monday, October 19, 2020, which is 8:00 am on Tuesday, October 20 in Sydney.

Matt's topic will be More Than A Feeling: Knowledge Management & Emotion. The call will held be in Zoom, not using our usual dial-in numbers.

Here is the Zoom link.
Here are additional details.
Here is a related thread.

Our lives are full of emotion but emotions are rarely talked about in knowledge management. In this session Matt will discuss:

Different theories of emotion and what they mean for organizations
How knowledge and information professionals can manage their own emotions and respond to those of others
How to design products and programs that account for emotion

SIKM Leaders Community Monthly Call

When: Monday, October 19, 2020, 5:00-6:00 PM Eastern Daylight Time
Community Site
Previous Calls
Future Calls
Calendar




-- 
Matt Moore
M. +61 (0) 423 784 504
matt@...