What to call knowledge management? #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-flow #name


John Muz
 

 

Hi KM Practitioners,


I am new in the KM world and this is my first post on this forum. Before posting, I searched for previous posts on this but could not any,

 

While reading "Mastering Organizational Knowledge Flow: How to Make Knowledge Sharing Work" - Frank Leistner . I was wondering what you think about the idea of Frank Leistner  calling a ‘stop’ to the word “Knowledge Management” (KM) to “Knowledge Flow Management (KFM)”. And, if his idea is totally accepted in the KM community then, why do we still have persistence use of KM instead of KFM.

 

Using the term 'Knowledge Management' instead of 'Knowledge Flow Management', he notes:

 

“it creates a wrong sense of understanding and people will use unsuitable approaches to solve issues connected with it’   ...First, there is a problem with those two words in combination…”

“After a long time of playing with alternative terms, the one that actually fits best with my understanding is knowledge flow management, because the thing that you can manage is the flow of knowledge. You can speed it up by providing tools and technology as a foundation.”

 

‘Along those same lines, it is not possible to “transfer knowledge,” at least not in the direct sense of transferring an entity from one person to another. What actually happens is that person A shares some information, which is then used by person B and combined with prior (tacit) knowledge and experiences to create new knowledge.’

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Regards

John Muzam,

PhD – Candidate

Wroclaw- Poland


John Antill
 

First as long as you are doing it there is no right or wrong answer to this.It is the same as Knowledge Broker. The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management. Locally you can use whatever works to describe what you do. I prefer the term knowledge broker because I am selling information flow one way or the other to another party. Everything has a cost. The biggest problem we have right now is the ability to show management the actual cost per person metric on how we save money. You upgrade computers to faster computers/internet/communications to save money.  Same thing with transportation. Call yourself a Knowledge Flow manager if that helps. 
An organization's knowledge inherently needs to show the hard and soft costs. Show that.
It is a river. There are docks, eddies, boats, and a whole plethora of ways to get goods down it. You hire a river master to get it the fastest most efficient way possible. 
All KM is a guide to what you should be doing. 
I am getting a Master of Science in Knowledge Management hence a STEM degree. It is derived from the Library of Science and today librarians call themselves a plethora of titles. The point is to use what you feel comfortable with. Until the tangent intellect of a company (business intelligence) is traded on wall street, it is loaned against but not traded, I shall use the term KNowledge manager or Knowledge Specialist, or whatever the title the US Army gives me. Some are Knowledge Consultants. 
John Antill
MCKM, CKS IA KT
Kent State MS KM Advisory Board Member
MS KM Student at Kent State
256-541-1229


Douglas Weidner
 

John,


Welcome to the Knowledge Age!

 

The world has passed thru a number of fundamental episodic changes that have greatly affected human occupations—from hunter-gatherers, to the Agrarian, Industrial and more recent Info Ages. We are now entering the challenging Knowledge Age, where robots, drones and artificial intelligence will replace many existing occupations.

 

Knowledge Management (KM) is a transformational discipline. It optimizes evidence-based, human and organizational performance in the K Age as a ‘Learning Organization’. Learning Organizations are enabled by KM Systems (IT), but driven by substantially improved human aptitudes (skills and competencies) and especially by transformation of K Worker attitudes (personal purpose and passion).  K Workers have unique K-Age activities, which include trusted interpersonal collaborations, K sharing, and especially creativity.

 

We must act now to develop personal knowledge managers, the future workforce, who will have much increased engagement, personal performance and job satisfaction. The cumulative result will be substantially-improved, organizational performance, health and sustainment in the K Age.


At the KM Institute, we know that KM is much more than just increasing K flow. Besides, such definitional battles have been fought and settled in the past. In the early 2000s, many thought to call it K Sharing.


You can argue whether we are in the K Age/Economy/Society/Era, but the concept of KM, dating to mid-1990s, has been long settled. Further, you can argue that KM is about 'People, Process and Technology' which is true, but if it is the K Age, it is much more about K and that is about people, not technology which has become quite ubiquitous and commoditized.There are over 10,000 Certified K Managers (CKM) and many more KMers with a KM job title with $Billions spent by KM providers, from consultants to technologies.


Also, it might be helpful for you to at least read the ISO 30401:2018 Knowledge management systems - Requirements, but please don't confuse the word systems to think it means an IT system.


On Sat, Feb 27, 2021 at 9:12 AM John Muz <fatherjohnmuzam@...> wrote:

 

Hi KM Practitioners,


I am new in the KM world and this is my first post on this forum. Before posting, I searched for previous posts on this but could not any,

 

While reading "Mastering Organizational Knowledge Flow: How to Make Knowledge Sharing Work" - Frank Leistner . I was wondering what you think about the idea of Frank Leistner  calling a ‘stop’ to the word “Knowledge Management” (KM) to “Knowledge Flow Management (KFM)”. And, if his idea is totally accepted in the KM community then, why do we still have persistence use of KM instead of KFM.

 

Using the term 'Knowledge Management' instead of 'Knowledge Flow Management', he notes:

 

“it creates a wrong sense of understanding and people will use unsuitable approaches to solve issues connected with it’   ...First, there is a problem with those two words in combination…”

“After a long time of playing with alternative terms, the one that actually fits best with my understanding is knowledge flow management, because the thing that you can manage is the flow of knowledge. You can speed it up by providing tools and technology as a foundation.”

 

‘Along those same lines, it is not possible to “transfer knowledge,” at least not in the direct sense of transferring an entity from one person to another. What actually happens is that person A shares some information, which is then used by person B and combined with prior (tacit) knowledge and experiences to create new knowledge.’

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Regards

John Muzam,

PhD – Candidate

Wroclaw- Poland


Douglas Weidner
 

Good advice John,

Call it whatever works for you, but as you said...make it successful.

From what I've seen, being successful is much more the issue to be resolved, than the what to call it. Be successful and you can call it whatever you want.

Douglas Weidner
Chief CKM Instructor
KM Institute

On Sat, Feb 27, 2021 at 10:26 AM John Antill <jantill4@...> wrote:
First as long as you are doing it there is no right or wrong answer to this.It is the same as Knowledge Broker. The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management. Locally you can use whatever works to describe what you do. I prefer the term knowledge broker because I am selling information flow one way or the other to another party. Everything has a cost. The biggest problem we have right now is the ability to show management the actual cost per person metric on how we save money. You upgrade computers to faster computers/internet/communications to save money.  Same thing with transportation. Call yourself a Knowledge Flow manager if that helps. 
An organization's knowledge inherently needs to show the hard and soft costs. Show that.
It is a river. There are docks, eddies, boats, and a whole plethora of ways to get goods down it. You hire a river master to get it the fastest most efficient way possible. 
All KM is a guide to what you should be doing. 
I am getting a Master of Science in Knowledge Management hence a STEM degree. It is derived from the Library of Science and today librarians call themselves a plethora of titles. The point is to use what you feel comfortable with. Until the tangent intellect of a company (business intelligence) is traded on wall street, it is loaned against but not traded, I shall use the term KNowledge manager or Knowledge Specialist, or whatever the title the US Army gives me. Some are Knowledge Consultants. 
John Antill
MCKM, CKS IA KT
Kent State MS KM Advisory Board Member
MS KM Student at Kent State
256-541-1229


 
Edited

1. KFM is not “totally accepted in the KM community.” As a matter of fact, this is the first I’ve heard of it (granted, I’m not familiar with Leister’s work; and have not been actively researching the field in the last couple of years). 
2. KM as I understand it is a broad discipline, comprising dozens of areas of endeavor. Narrative design, communities of practice, best practice sharing, after action learning, taxonomy, portals...the list goes on and on (there’s a nice diagram or two  stashed in the file cabinet here somewhere). 
3. Along those lines, the F in KFM feels too limiting to me. At a minimum, regardless of terminology, I think everyone here would agree that “knowledge” can exist both as a stock and a flow. So why rename the KM so it focuses only on flow? Whither knowledge as a stock??
4. As others have already pointed out, it really doesn’t matter what you call it - the definitional battles have been fought more times than I can count, and further resolution of them is not likely forthcoming. Focus on a measurable business outcome and call it something that reflects the desired outcome and you’ll be fine. 
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-Tom
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Tom Short Consulting
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Stan Garfield
 


John Muz
 

Thank you, John. That sounds interesting :)    The scientific community we belong to is Knowledge Management.  Use whatever works to describe what you do. 


John Muz
 

Thank you all for the input.
Indeed, that has clarified my doubt, and given me a clear picture and insight into the topic- KM name 

John Muzam,

PhD – Candidate

Wroclaw- Poland


Matt Moore