Agile Knowledge Management #agile


Elizabeth Winter
 

Hi, Folks—

 

Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:

 

As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:

 

  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment

 

It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  

 

But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?

 

For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.

 

Thanks,

Lizzi

 

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 




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Leif Edvinsson
 

Very relevant observation. As a start it might be valuable to maka distinction onto  Knowledge Navigation. KN has 3 key dimensions
: position, direction and speed. 
See more in my Corporate Longitude book. See also the new KM ISO standard work. As well  as the knowledge dynamics also called Wissensbilanz , from Germany, based on MIT work by late prof Jay Forrester
Best wishes
Leif 

ons 3 mars 2021 kl. 15:22 skrev Elizabeth Winter <elizabeth.winter@...>:

Hi, Folks—

 

Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:

 

As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:

 

  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment

 

It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  

 

But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?

 

For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.

 

Thanks,

Lizzi

 

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 




This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.


Disclaimer

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Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hi Lizzi,

This is such a critical question to ask of ourselves. I am inclined to think that this is on the same lines as short-term thinking vs long-term thinking. I believe organisations are indeed marching towards better search engines and machine learning based discoveries and - in general - having technology compensate for lack of - to put it bluntly - human discipline and integrity. I think one of the workarounds is to focus on designing and establishing processes that pay attention to knowledge and its utilisation. Someone in the team and organisation must wear the hat of a person who considers long-term agility as opposed to myopic agility.....

Eager to see what others have to share. 

Regards 
Nirmala 


On Wed, 3 Mar 2021 at 7:52 PM, Elizabeth Winter <elizabeth.winter@...> wrote:

Hi, Folks—

 

Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:

 

As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:

 

  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment

 

It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  

 

But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?

 

For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.

 

Thanks,

Lizzi

 

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 




This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.


Disclaimer

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Matt Moore
 

Elizabeth,

Have you come across the concept of “pace layering”? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shearing_layers

You’re probably best of starting with the different tempos and cadences of different business activities - different life cycles: at one end you have the lifecycle of the entire company then down into the lifecycles of different markets and service offerings then into the lifecycles of customers & staff then into projects then down to a scrum standup. We’ve gone from decades to minutes.

What are the different kinds of knowledge and information that change at those different speeds?

BTW automating stuff works if the content you apply it to is predictable and standardised. The less standardised it is, the less well automation will work.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Mar 4, 2021, at 1:22 AM, Elizabeth Winter <elizabeth.winter@...> wrote:



Hi, Folks—

 

Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:

 

As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:

 

  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment

 

It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  

 

But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?

 

For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.

 

Thanks,

Lizzi

 

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager

<image003.png>

3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 




This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.


Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

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Murray Jennex
 

to build on Matt's post (a good one btw) is the thought that agile vs traditional is not a either/or situation.  I've been a project manager for 30 years as well as a KM researcher and one of the things that PMs are moving too is realizing that agile methods are a tool that can be used in any project or initiative situation; and you don't have to do just agile.  As Matt mentions, there are several life cycles and while agile tends to ignore life cycles in favor of sprints, an experienced PM realizes that you can apply agile methods to any project.  If fact, we have a traditional lifecycle that is agile base, the RAD (Rapid Application Development) lifecycle.  So, within a PM environment, the PM can choose methods that work best with slow objectives and use different methods with fast objectives, no problem and in fact, this will be well received as it shows you to be a modern PM not rooted in tradition.  Just my thoughts on this, and to be clear, I'm saying I don't see why you have to choose traditional approaches or agile approaches, you should both in the situations appropriate for each.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Moore <matt@...>
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Mar 3, 2021 11:28 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Agile Knowledge Management

Elizabeth,

Have you come across the concept of “pace layering”? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shearing_layers

You’re probably best of starting with the different tempos and cadences of different business activities - different life cycles: at one end you have the lifecycle of the entire company then down into the lifecycles of different markets and service offerings then into the lifecycles of customers & staff then into projects then down to a scrum standup. We’ve gone from decades to minutes.

What are the different kinds of knowledge and information that change at those different speeds?

BTW automating stuff works if the content you apply it to is predictable and standardised. The less standardised it is, the less well automation will work.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Mar 4, 2021, at 1:22 AM, Elizabeth Winter <elizabeth.winter@...> wrote:


Hi, Folks—
 
Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:
 
As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:
 
  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment
 
It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  
 
But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?
 
For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.
 
Thanks,
Lizzi
 
 
LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager

<image003.png>

3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us
 



This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.


Disclaimer
The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business. Providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Specializing in; Security, archiving and compliance. To find out more Click Here.


Bruce Boyes
 

Hi Elizabeth,

Real-time iterative learning is an alternative to trying to rapidly update document repositories. The following links may be of assistance in this regard:


Based on the above and a growing body of other related research, I have recommended that such approaches be much more widely used.

Best regards,

Bruce.



On Thursday, 4 March 2021, 12:07:33 pm AEDT, Murray Jennex via groups.io <murphjen@...> wrote:


to build on Matt's post (a good one btw) is the thought that agile vs traditional is not a either/or situation.  I've been a project manager for 30 years as well as a KM researcher and one of the things that PMs are moving too is realizing that agile methods are a tool that can be used in any project or initiative situation; and you don't have to do just agile.  As Matt mentions, there are several life cycles and while agile tends to ignore life cycles in favor of sprints, an experienced PM realizes that you can apply agile methods to any project.  If fact, we have a traditional lifecycle that is agile base, the RAD (Rapid Application Development) lifecycle.  So, within a PM environment, the PM can choose methods that work best with slow objectives and use different methods with fast objectives, no problem and in fact, this will be well received as it shows you to be a modern PM not rooted in tradition.  Just my thoughts on this, and to be clear, I'm saying I don't see why you have to choose traditional approaches or agile approaches, you should both in the situations appropriate for each.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Moore <matt@...>
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: SIKM@groups.io
Sent: Wed, Mar 3, 2021 11:28 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Agile Knowledge Management

Elizabeth,

Have you come across the concept of “pace layering”? https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shearing_layers

You’re probably best of starting with the different tempos and cadences of different business activities - different life cycles: at one end you have the lifecycle of the entire company then down into the lifecycles of different markets and service offerings then into the lifecycles of customers & staff then into projects then down to a scrum standup. We’ve gone from decades to minutes.

What are the different kinds of knowledge and information that change at those different speeds?

BTW automating stuff works if the content you apply it to is predictable and standardised. The less standardised it is, the less well automation will work.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Mar 4, 2021, at 1:22 AM, Elizabeth Winter <elizabeth.winter@...> wrote:


Hi, Folks—
 
Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:
 
As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:
 
  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment
 
It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  
 
But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?
 
For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.
 
Thanks,
Lizzi
 
 
LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager

<image003.png>

3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us
 



This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.


Disclaimer
The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

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Nick Milton
 

Hi Lizzi

 

I don’t think  its so much about Agile, of Fast and Slow; I think its more about the nature of knowledge compared to the nature of  information.

 

Knowledge is not static - it evolves. Different topics evolve at different rates, but the nature of knowledge is that it is always changing.  Documents, on the other hand, do not change. They are published, then maybe a revision is published, then maybe another revision, but each is a static document with a publication date.

 

Therefore I think you can argue that documents are not the natural home for knowledge. Knowledge is better served by being stored somewhere it can constantly evolve, such as articles in a wiki, or articles in a knowledge base which can be constantly updated and are (therefore) constantly up to date. The content in the wiki or knowledge base is always “latest and greatest” because it is the collectively-sourced “common truth” (provided that there is a clear and active discussion and update path). Therefore we don’t think in terms of “final documents” but on “current state of the art”. This content can always link to documents, in the form of examples, templates etc etc where required.

 

If this is the case, then document management and information retrieval approaches alone will not serve. You need to concentrate more on the collective creation and update of the current truth.

 

 

Nick Milton

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elizabeth Winter
Sent: 03 March 2021 14:22
To: sikm@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Agile Knowledge Management

 

Hi, Folks—

 

Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:

 

As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:

 

  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment

 

It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  

 

But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?

 

For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.

 

Thanks,

Lizzi

 

 

LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us

 

 



This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.

Disclaimer

The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business. Providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Specializing in; Security, archiving and compliance. To find out more Click Here.


Murray Jennex
 

Nick, I think you missed the use of procedures in organizations, lots of how to knowledge is captured in procedures and they guide decisions.  For legal and other purposes you have to track the revisions/versions of procedures, you just can't get out of that,  Of course this knowledge evolves and the organization makes changes to the procedures then the organization can keep the current version of the procedure on the wiki or portal, but somewhere there needs to be a repository of revisions/versions and a history of the document.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Nick Milton <nick.milton@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io; sikm@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Mar 4, 2021 1:43 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Agile Knowledge Management

Hi Lizzi
 
I don’t think  its so much about Agile, of Fast and Slow; I think its more about the nature of knowledge compared to the nature of  information.
 
Knowledge is not static - it evolves. Different topics evolve at different rates, but the nature of knowledge is that it is always changing.  Documents, on the other hand, do not change. They are published, then maybe a revision is published, then maybe another revision, but each is a static document with a publication date.
 
Therefore I think you can argue that documents are not the natural home for knowledge. Knowledge is better served by being stored somewhere it can constantly evolve, such as articles in a wiki, or articles in a knowledge base which can be constantly updated and are (therefore) constantly up to date. The content in the wiki or knowledge base is always “latest and greatest” because it is the collectively-sourced “common truth” (provided that there is a clear and active discussion and update path). Therefore we don’t think in terms of “final documents” but on “current state of the art”. This content can always link to documents, in the form of examples, templates etc etc where required.
 
If this is the case, then document management and information retrieval approaches alone will not serve. You need to concentrate more on the collective creation and update of the current truth.
 
 
Nick Milton

 
 
From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Elizabeth Winter
Sent: 03 March 2021 14:22
To: sikm@groups.io
Subject: [SIKM] Agile Knowledge Management
 
Hi, Folks—
 
Here’s a question I’m grappling with and would love your thoughts:
 
As the pace of knowledge and content creation accelerates and organizations turn to more agile ways of working, how does Knowledge Management balance what I’m calling “slow” objectives and the “fast” ones? Key examples (not exhaustive) are below:
 
  • “Slow” Objectives = content classification, protection/retention of the organization’s intellectual property (avoiding the “brain drain” when SMEs leave the organization), information governance
  • “Fast” Objectives = ability to search and retrieve the latest and greatest content, rapid knowledge-sharing for reuse/efficiency in an agile environment
 
It is tempting to give up on trying to create repositories of “final” documents, applying metadata and adhering to controlled vocabularies and naming conventions, especially in an agile world where things are never “done” (MVP, continuous improvement) – is the “final” version of a document even a relevant concept any longer? (Permanence is not a priority in Agile.)  
 
But everything I’ve ever learned about information organization and retrieval suggests we cannot abandon these. So what kinds of solutions can help us? Auto-classification seems to be one key ingredient. Others?
 
For reference, my use case is a professional services firm (knowledge is our product) using primarily Microsoft365 toolset (SharePoint Online as the foundation) and implementing agile methodologies firm-wide.
 
Thanks,
Lizzi
 
 
LIZZI WINTER
Knowledge Management Program Manager


3333 Piedmont Road, NE | Suite 1000 | Atlanta, GA 30305
O: +1.404.975.6298
www.northhighland.com | Connect With Us
 
 


This message may contain confidential information, legally privileged information or other information subject to legal restrictions. If you are not a designated recipient of this message, or an agent responsible for delivering it to a designated recipient, please do not read, copy, use or disclose this message or its attachments, and notify the sender by replying to this message and delete or destroy all copies of this message and attachments.

Disclaimer
The information contained in this communication from the sender is confidential. It is intended solely for use by the recipient and others authorized to receive it. If you are not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking action in relation of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful.

This email has been scanned for viruses and malware, and may have been automatically archived by Mimecast Ltd, an innovator in Software as a Service (SaaS) for business. Providing a safer and more useful place for your human generated data. Specializing in; Security, archiving and compliance. To find out more Click Here.


Tami Dubi
 

Hi, 
I think the distinction between a document and an article is subjective and relates to the organization's policies and processes. A WIKI article can be rigid and not updated, whereas a document could be updated frequently and even automatically.  
I agree that there is a tension between agile and the need to have "one source of truth," which is reliable, specific, and is always updated  (in whatever documentation form or shape). I believe the solution will have to involve processes and automation so that the documentation burden will not be solely on the employees. 

Tami Dubi