Generations #generations


Yao Ge
 

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen-Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older generations (like me).



From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of dkkildebeck@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available

Oh yes, Twitter. Tried it.....here's my feelings about it:
 
 
-------------- Original message --------------
From: Peter Dorfman

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman

On Wed Jul 2 13:45 , 'Stan Garfield' <stangarfield@gmail.com> sent:

>
>APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM Leaders
>Community. This could include con call logistics, providing wider
>access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.
>
>Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for their
>views. If you agree, disagree, or have ! other s uggestions on this topic,
>please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made without first
>notifying the members.
>
>Regards,
>Stan
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Bill Kaplan wrote:
>> I would suggest considering a multiple set of candidate sponsors if
>this
>> is the approach taken.
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Mike Koffman wrote:
>> Stan, if you put all these presentations together you will have a nice
>> book of readings. Perhaps that is something to consider. Over time,
>> quite a bit of intellectual capital has passed through this community.
>> A volunteer committee might pick the "best" offerings and seek to get
>> release permission from the authors. Perhaps an APQC-sponsored
>> ! publica tion? The nice idea to me is the concept of a publication
>> emanating from a an on-line virtual community.
>
>
>
>
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David Snowden <snowded@...>
 

Disagree - its not a generation thing, some can some can't
OK current generation have done more of it, but check out the use of social software by older people



Dave Snowden
Founder & Chief Scientific Officer
Cognitive Edge Pte Ltd

Now blogging at www.cognitive-edge.com


On 3 Jul 2008, at 00:23, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:


There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen-Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older generations (like me).


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Ofdkkildebeck@comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available

Oh yes, Twitter. Tried it.....here's my feelings about it:
 
 
-------------- Original message -------------- 
From: Peter Dorfman com> 

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman

On Wed Jul 2 13:45 , 'Stan Garfield' <stangarfield@gmail.com> sent:

>
>APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM Leaders
>Community. This could include con call logistics, providing wider
>access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.
>
>Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for their
>views. If you agree, disagree, or have ! other s uggestions on this topic,
>please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made without first
>notifying the members.
>
>Regards,
>Stan
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Bill Kaplan wrote:
>> I would suggest considering a multiple set of candidate sponsors if
>this
>> is the approach taken.
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Mike Koffman wrote:
>> Stan, if you put all these presentations together you will have a nice
>> book of readings. Perhaps that is something to consider. Over time,
>> quite a bit of intellectual capital has passed through this community.
>> A volunteer committee might pick the "best" offerings and seek to get
>> release permission from the authors. Perhaps an APQC-sponsored
>> ! publica tion? The nice idea to me is the concept of a publication
>> emanating from a an on-line virtual community.
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------------
>
>Yahoo! Groups Links
>
> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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>
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& gt;
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Patrick Lambe
 

As a generalisation it is sometimes useful to talk about the generation thing. But there are billions of teenagers not twittering. My own perception is that the different social media platforms seem to form their own "tribes" in which age is just one of the demographic factors in the formation of identity clusters around that platform - and this can even vary from application to application within the same type of platform.

As for attention span, it's my view that the capacity for deep analytical thought and focused attention is more the exception than the norm - ie it's easier and more "natural" to have scattered distributed attention than to focus. I'd go so far as to say that the latter capacity is the more artificial one, more the preserve of university graduates, master craftsmen and religious communities than homo naturalis. It's not a generational thing at all, but just a matter of whether you're old enough to have been trained into focused attentiveness. Which is why even those who are trained in it find it so easy to be distracted. Which is why I daren't go near Twitter. Which is why I'm going to switch off my email for a couple of hours now.

P


On 03 Jul 2008, at 7:23 AM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen-Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older generations (like me).


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Ofdkkildebeck@comcast.net
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:15 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available

Oh yes, Twitter. Tried it.....here's my feelings about it:
 
<451222123>
 
-------------- Original message -------------- 
From: Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@knowfarm.com> 

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman

On Wed Jul 2 13:45 , 'Stan Garfield' <stangarfield@gmail.com> sent:

>
>APQC has offered to play a larger role in supporting the SIKM Leaders
>Community. This could include con call logistics, providing wider
>access to presentations, and providing a blog platform.
>
>Before agreeing to any of this, I wanted to ask the members for their
>views. If you agree, disagree, or have ! other s uggestions on this topic,
>please reply to this thread. No decisions will be made without first
>notifying the members.
>
>Regards,
>Stan
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Bill Kaplan wrote:
>> I would suggest considering a multiple set of candidate sponsors if
>this
>> is the approach taken.
>
>
>--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, Mike Koffman wrote:
>> Stan, if you put all these presentations together you will have a nice
>> book of readings. Perhaps that is something to consider. Over time,
>> quite a bit of intellectual capital has passed through this community.
>> A volunteer committee might pick the "best" offerings and seek to get
>> release permission from the authors. Perhaps an APQC-sponsored
>> ! publica tion? The nice idea to me is the concept of a publication
>> emanating from a an on-line virtual community.
>
>
>
>
>------------------------------------
>
>Yahoo! Groups Links
>
> To visit your group on the web, go to:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/
>
> Your email settings:
> Individual Email | Traditional
>
> To change settings online go to:
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/join
> (Yahoo! ID required)
>
> To change settings via email:
> sikmleaders-digest@yahoogroups.com 
> sikmleaders-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com/! A>
& gt;
> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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sikmleaders-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference call, while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen- Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older generations (like me).
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862


Bill Ives <iveswilliam@...>
 

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference where this came up and I objected.  Us older people have actually seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit more perspective here. 

On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:

As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype 
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference call, 
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

> There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen- 
> Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older 
> generations (like me).
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862



Allan Crawford
 

And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive at the same time?

 

John Medina’s new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….

 

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

 

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference where this came up and I objected.  Us older people have actually seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit more perspective here. 

 

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

 

Bill

 

 

On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype 
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference call, 
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

> There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen- 
> Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older 
> generations (like me).
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862

 


Bill Ives <iveswilliam@...>
 

Allan

No, I would hopefully be smart enough to know when to not multi-task and what type of tasks to mix, passively listening to iTunes in the car is enough for me, although I will drink coffee and glance at the headlines on the paper at a red light.  Thanks for the book pointer.  

Bill

On Jul 2, 2008, at 10:10 PM, allan crawford wrote:


And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive at the same time?

 

John Medina’s new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….

 

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto.com


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

 

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference where this came up and I objected.  Us older people have actually seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit more perspective here. 

 

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

 

Bill

 

 

On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype 
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference call, 
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

> There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen- 
> Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older 
> generations (like me).
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862

 





Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

Like I said about my situation with Skype -- that was not a typical day. I have used a Blackberry in the car -- but not while moving... except for voice. But it is great, as are my friends' iPhones, for looking up a Google map exactly when you need it.

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 10:10 PM, allan crawford wrote:

And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive at the same time?


Allan Crawford
 

Valdis and Bill – just poking fun…  I to am a very big fan of technology and would be much less productive with out it.  However, when it comes to the multitasking side of things, I know that if I want to get work done that really requires my attention it’s time to turn off the Blackberry, Twitter and NPR.  The brain science behind this seems fairly compelling (although as a geologist…I’m far from a brain scientist).  So even when the gen x,yer’s… make claims about multitasking, I suspect that they are giving no more than 50% of their attention to anyone topic.

 

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto.com


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

 

Like I said about my situation with Skype -- that was not a typical
day. I have used a Blackberry in the car -- but not while moving...
except for voice. But it is great, as are my friends' iPhones, for
looking up a Google map exactly when you need it.

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 10:10 PM, allan crawford wrote:

> And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
> at the same time?
>


Bill Ives <iveswilliam@...>
 

my last reply all on this - promise

Allan

I knew you were kidding. I agree with you completely.  I am actually a cognitive psychologist by training and did research on the effects of cognition.  There are tasks that mix and tasks that clash.  Researchers have been looking into this for some time.  While some of the younger brains might be a bit sharper, they are not structurally different and cannot, for example, do two tasks that require close visual attention at the same time with a high level of competence, while mixed modality tasks like visual and verbal tasks can complement each other, especially when the content is complementary.  But even when not, we can all listen to a conference call and go through email without losing too much. 

Personally, I always have music on in the background while I work, it helps me focus. But when I really want to focus, I play instrumental jazz ballads to avoid hearing lyrics. 

Thanks again. Bill


On Jul 2, 2008, at 10:38 PM, allan crawford wrote:


Valdis and Bill – just poking fun…  I to am a very big fan of technology and would be much less productive with out it.  However, when it comes to the multitasking side of things, I know that if I want to get work done that really requires my attention it’s time to turn off the Blackberry, Twitter and NPR.  The brain science behind this seems fairly compelling (although as a geologist…I’m far from a brain scientist).  So even when the gen x,yer’s… make claims about multitasking, I suspect that they are giving no more than 50% of their attention to anyone topic.

 

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto.com


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Valdis Krebs
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:25 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

 

Like I said about my situation with Skype -- that was not a typical 
day. I have used a Blackberry in the car -- but not while moving... 
except for voice. But it is great, as are my friends' iPhones, for 
looking up a Google map exactly when you need it.

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 10:10 PM, allan crawford wrote:

> And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive 
> at the same time?
>





Don Kildebeck
 

Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking makes us stupid?"
Quote:
"Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot on just how much they suck at it.

We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time, with little or no degradation of either communication.

We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.

We believe we can surf the web while talking to our kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.

But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and the ability to think deeply)".

Here's the full article:
 
 
 

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "allan crawford"

And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive at the same time?

John Medinas new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age.

Allan Crawford

310-994-1619

www.acrawfordphoto.com


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference where this came up and I objected.  Us older people have actually seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit more perspective here. 

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

Bill

On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype 
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference call, 
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

> There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold". Gen- 
> Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older 
> generations (like me).
> http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st ory.php?storyId=91769862


Bill Linn <wlinn@...>
 

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, dkkildebeck@... wrote:

Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking
makes us stupid?"
Quote:
"Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority
of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot
on just how much they suck at it.
We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time,
with little or no degradation of either communication.
We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
We believe we can surf the web while talking to our
kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and
the ability to think deeply)".
Here's the full article:
http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
king_ma.html



-------------- Original message --------------
From: "allan crawford" <allancrawford@...>
And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
at the same time?

John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights
into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….

Allan Crawford
310-994-1619
www.acrawfordphoto.com



From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"

Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am
tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social
software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference
where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually
seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit
more perspective here.

http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/

Bill


On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:



As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype
chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference
call,
while I read/answer simple emails.

Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!

Valdis

On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:

There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold".
Gen-
Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older
generations (like me).
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862


Gardner, Mike <Micheal.Gardner@...>
 

I think it depends what you mean by multi-tasking.
 
I absolutely agree that trying to do two things at once leads to neither being done correctly. You only have to look at the evidence for the use of hand held phones in cars whilst driving to show this is the case. Trying to do the two things together leads to accidents (and hence the ban on their use in the UK). And even the evidence for the use of hands free phones in cars and their relation to accidents is piling up (no metaphor intended).
 
I have found that I sometimes will listen to a conference call, have an instant message conference going in the background with some attendees, and be reading my email at the same time. But if someone suddenly asks you a question in the meeting, how often do you find you have missed the last point and have to ask them to recap. There may be an appropriate level where you are only in a listening mode and can do some email processing while listening to a teleconference. I would be interested to know if this has ever been identified.
 
However, the focus on a single task with no other focus for the full day can also detract from productivity. You sometimes need to step back and do something else, and then return to the task with a fresh impetus. I know I find that if I concentrate on one thing to the exclusion of all else I find my mind starts to wander on to other subjects.
 

Mike Gardner
EDS CIO EKM Team - EDS Taxonomist & Content Rationalization Leader
Telephone: +44 (0)1332 663964 (Home Office)
Mobile: +44 (0)7790 492991
Work from home, Derby, UK
micheal.gardner@...

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From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Bill Linn
Sent: 03 July 2008 08:42
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Re: Multitasking

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.

--- In sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com, dkkildebeck@... wrote:
>
> Great article on the Creative Passionate Users blog "Multitasking
makes us stupid?"
> Quote:
> "Perhaps the biggest problem of all, though, is that the majority
of people doing the most media multitasking have a big-ass blind spot
on just how much they suck at it.
> We believe we can e-mail and talk on the phone at the same time,
with little or no degradation of either communication.
> We believe we can do homework while watching a movie.
> We believe we can surf the web while talking to our
kids/spouse/lover/co-worker.
> But we can't! (Not without a hit on every level--time, quality, and
the ability to think deeply)".
> Here's the full article:
>
http://headrush.typepad.com/creating_passionate_users/2006/03/multitas
king_ma.html
>
>
>
> -------------- Original message --------------
> From: "allan crawford" ...>
> And once you have wireless in your car will you be trying to drive
at the same time?
>
> John Medina's new book Brain Rules has some interesting insights
into the effectives (or lack of) for multitasking at any age….
>
> Allan Crawford
> 310-994-1619
> www.acrawfordphoto.com
>
>
>
> From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bill Ives
> Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2008 7:01 PM
> To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [sikmleaders] stop bashing the "older generations"
>
> Good for you Validis, as an already gone grey consultant, I am
tired of all this old folks bashing around the use of social
software. Here is a blog post on a recent Enterprise 2.0 conference
where this came up and I objected. Us older people have actually
seen multiple waves of new technologies and can perhaps have a bit
more perspective here.
>
> http://www.fastforwardblog.com/2008/06/11/enterprise-20-conference-
notes-reality-check-with-andrew-mcafee/
>
> Bill
>
>
> On Jul 2, 2008, at 9:00 PM, Valdis Krebs wrote:
>
>
>
> As a starting-to-gray consultant, I have had a half a several Skype
> chat sessions going at once, while I listen in on a conference
call,
> while I read/answer simple emails.
>
> Not my typical day, but us old farts can multi-task too!
>
> Valdis
>
> On Jul 2, 2008, at 7:23 PM, Ge, Yao (Y.) wrote:
>
> > There is a huge generation gap on "braing thrashing threshold".
Gen-
> > Y seems to be able mutli-tasking much more effectively than older
> > generations (like me).
> > http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91769862
>


Yao Ge
 

Very insightful Mark. When I brought up the issue of generation gap, I mean to bring attention to gaps in habits and comfort levels to different types of media people leverage to stay connected to each other. It is not that much about multi-tasking vs. single tasking and shallow thinking vs. deep thinking. We need both skills preferably and someone would thrive in one vs. the other. One of the KM goal to bring all these type talents together via all available channels that they are on. There is no stereotyping on old generations. I do think the brains get wired differently in younger generation and workplace needs to be ready to leverage it.
 
Here is the video achieve for Enterprise 2.0 Conference
The Enterprise 2.0 Reality Check panel discussion is the 3rd from the top. The two guys sat at the right end of the panel are from CIA. They worked on Intellipedia project.
 
-Yao


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Mark D Neff
Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 8:39 AM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: [sikmleaders] Twitter


Matt and Peter,

I agree about Twitter. I see a lot of people using it to chronicle their day, not so useful. Others use it to pose interesting questions or share what they are working on. Much more useful ... at least to me. Recently I attended a Twebinar (maybe the one you mentioned below) - webinar with hosted twitter session on the side. It was very fast paced but interesting. It took back channel to a whole new level. Lots of people commenting on what they heard, what they could apply, what they wanted more of, what they agreed with, what they didn't agree with, other topics they would like to see addressed in a similar manner. (There were close to 40 twitters a minute during some of the conference that had over 500 people in attendance.) Anything you can do to get real feedback from people other than a smiley sheet at the end is a step in the right direction for me. It also leads up to getting a discussion to last longer than just the event and building a support team for asking questions afterwards. As a result of attending the twebinar (www.twebinar.com), I added several people to follow and several people added me to the list of people they follow. Just because you have not found a use for it yet, does not mean one does not exist.

I have already had one colleague confess that Twitter is the only way she could get an answer to something from someone. They didn't respond to email, didn't respond to a phone call. They did however respond to her question on Twitter. Very interesting. Again, we just need to figure out what medium people respond to and be versatile enough to use what they prefer to use to get our answers and continue building the behaviors necessary to encourage collaboration - in all forms. I see potential value to it for a manager trying to keep in touch with their remote workers. If you see them pop up on twitter and share a little bit about what they are working on it helps to fill in the unknown during the week between staff meetings when you really don't know what they are doing and you want to know but don't want to appear too intrusive or as if you are micro-managing them. It also gives you a chance to share withthem what you are working on. A new communication medium and a way for you to bring them along by helping them understand some of the things you are trying to address or have interests in. A new way build or enhance current strategies for relationship building. A quick way to jot down thoughts that might lead to an intersting blog article but something that literally takes seconds and not minutes or hours. A quicker way to point people to interesting urls you run across without having to string them along into a newsletter or even a reply to a listserv. It also focuses you. Getting a message into 140 characters is not easy when you first get started.

If interested, I am mneff on twitter. I don't "tweet" all day but I do put out a question from time to time or comment on something I am looking into.

Mark Neff
706.447.8522



Matt Moore co.uk>
Sent by: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com

07/02/2008 07:01 PM

Please respond to
sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com

To
sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Twitter




Peter,

I have had a Twitter account for nearly a year but only got into it in the last 3 months. The observation I would make is: Like all social software, Twitter is not much fun if you are doing it by yourself. It becomes fun (& useful) when there is a group of you on there. I was at a conference a couple of weeks ago where half the audience (noo meeja) were Twittering & the other half (auld meeja) weren't. An eye-opener. And Twitter has actually demonstrated some ROI for me.

BTW My Twitter ID is innotecture if anyone wants to connect.

Cheers,

Matt


--- On Wed, 7/2/08, Peter Dorfman com> wrote:
From: Peter Dorfman com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 11:13 PM

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic ? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman






Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

"In 1898 psychologist William James wrote at length about varieties of human attention, saying steady attention was the default condition of a mature mind, and that an 'extreme mobility of the attention makes the child seem to belong less to himself than to every object which happens to catch his notice.' �
- Above quoted/paraphrased from NYTimes article here .

Ooooh - I really like that!   This was from a NYT summary of an article in The New Atlantis - the summary contains a link to the full article as well.  The reason I like the above quote is I do not believe that multitasking is such the heroic feat that those who claim competence with it would have us believe.  In fact, quite the opposite. 

Perhaps another way to think about the prevalence of multitasking is to consider that maybe the nature of work has changed, and much of it (certainly not all of it) does not require the same level of mental focus.  Could this represent a basic shift over the last 100 years or so from what work used to demand?  A century ago one was a either a professional, a tradesman/craftsman, or a laborer.  In those days the percentages of workers engaged in these categories were about opposite to what they are now - with upwards of what, 60%?, engaged in some type of laboring job.  So the ability to focus was the only way one could rise above being a laborer.  In  today's world people are paid a lot of money for jobs that do not require an extraordinary level of mental capacity (or focus).  I could go on with examples - just look around your office (if you work in one) and consider the kind of money people are being paid, and the actual level of skill required to do the job they happen to have. 

Just a thought.



Tom Short <tman9999@...>
 

And this NYT article  resonated with me as well - David Brooks talking about Tiger Woods and the difference between him and Rocco Mediate on the golf course in terms of their mental discipline.   As a competitor myself (not golf - motorcycle roadracing) I can certainly relate to the affect mental discipline has on my (and my competitors') performance - it is often what makes the difference in a race.


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

It all depends on the task, Bill. Not all tasks are equal, some should be multi-tasked, others should not.

It also depends on the person, people have different work styles and strengths.

A smart manager knows when to assign the right person to the right work.

I can do both, multi-task and focus, I hope I pick the right times/ situations to apply them!

Valdis

On Jul 3, 2008, at 3:41 AM, Bill Linn wrote:

Here is another idea from Dr. Edward M. Hallowell, M.D. in his book
Crazy Busy he has a chapter on the Myth and Reality of Multitasking.
In it he says on page 19 that, "It is fine to believe that
multitasking is a skill necessary in the modern world, but to believe
it is an equivalent substitute for single-minded focus on one task is
incorrect."

I would agree with what Dr. Hallowell says on this. I personally
perform better on a task when I am focused and devote my attention to
it. I think you might find Crazy Busy and interesting book. It is a
very affordable book, easy to read and I feel it is a great resource
for my personal productivity study.


Valdis Krebs <valdis@...>
 

But how do you know that is the real identity, Steve?

Maybe it is a 32 year old woman working for the CIA?

;-)

Valdis

On Jul 3, 2008, at 1:53 PM, Steve Ardire wrote:

Did you know that the #1 contributor to Intellipedia is a 69 year old guy ;)


Steve Ardire <sardire@...>
 


Yao Ge
 

Don Burke (the 2nd guy from right in the panel) mentioned the 69 Yr-old guy with 30,000 edits was trying to do everything with wiki.
-Yao


From: sikmleaders@... [mailto:sikmleaders@...] On Behalf Of Steve Ardire
Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 1:53 PM
To: sikmleaders@...
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Twitter

Yao I attended E2.0 conf and this session. Did you know that the #1 contributor to Intellipedia is a 69 year old guy ;)

On Thu, Jul 3, 2008 at 6:58 AM, Ge, Yao (Y.) <yge@...> wrote:

Very insightful Mark. When I brought up the issue of generation gap, I mean to bring attention to gaps in habits and comfort levels to different types of media people leverage to stay connected to each other. It is not that much about multi-tasking vs. single tasking and shallow thinking vs. deep thinking. We need both skills preferably and someone would thrive in one vs. the other. One of the KM goal to bring all these type talents together via all available channels that they are on. There is no stereotyping on old generations. I do think the brains get wired differently in younger generation and workplace needs to be ready to leverage it.
 
Here is the video achieve for Enterprise 2.0 Conference
The Enterprise 2.0 Reality Check panel discussion is the 3rd from the top. The two guys sat at the right end of the panel are from CIA. They worked on Intellipedia project.
 
-Yao


From: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark D Neff
Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 8:39 AM
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [sikmleaders] Twitter


Matt and Peter,

I agree about Twitter. I see a lot of people using it to chronicle their day, not so useful. Others use it to pose interesting questions or share what they are working on. Much more useful ... at least to me. Recently I attended a Twebinar (maybe the one you mentioned below) - webinar with hosted twitter session on the side. It was very fast paced but interesting. It took back channel to a whole new level. Lots of people commenting on what they heard, what they could apply, what they wanted more of, what they agreed with, what they didn't agree with, other topics they would like to see addressed in a similar manner. (There were close to 40 twitters a minute during some of the conference that had over 500 people in attendance.) Anything you can do to get real feedback from people other than a smiley sheet at the end is a step in the right direction for me. It also leads up to getting a discussion to last longer than just the event and building a support team for asking questions afterwards. As a result of attending the twebinar (www.twebinar.com), I added several people to follow and several people added me to the list of people they follow. Just because you have not found a use for it yet, does not mean one does not exist.

I have already had one colleague confess that Twitter is the only way she could get an answer to something from someone. They didn't respond to email, didn't respond to a phone call. They did however respond to her question on Twitter. Very interesting. Again, we just need to figure out what medium people respond to and be versatile enough to use what they prefer to use to get our answers and continue building the behaviors necessary to encourage collaboration - in all forms. I see potential value to it for a manager trying to keep in touch with their remote workers. If you see them pop up on twitter and share a little bit about what they are working on it helps to fill in the unknown during the week between staff meetings when you really don't know what they are doing and you want to know but don't want to appear too intrusive or as if you are micro-managing them. It also gives you a chance to share withthem what you are working on. A new communication medium and a way for you to bring them along by helping them understand some of the things you are trying to address or have interests in. A new way build or enhance current strategies for relationship building. A quick way to jot down thoughts that might lead to an intersting blog article but something that literally takes seconds and not minutes or hours. A quicker way to point people to interesting urls you run across without having to string them along into a newsletter or even a reply to a listserv. It also focuses you. Getting a message into 140 characters is not easy when you first get started.

If interested, I am mneff on twitter. I don't "tweet" all day but I do put out a question from time to time or comment on something I am looking into.

Mark Neff
706.447.8522



Matt Moore <laalgadger@yahoo.co.uk>
Sent by: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com

07/02/2008 07:01 PM


To
sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
cc
Subject
[sikmleaders] Twitter




Peter,

I have had a Twitter account for nearly a year but only got into it in the last 3 months. The observation I would make is: Like all social software, Twitter is not much fun if you are doing it by yourself. It becomes fun (& useful) when there is a group of you on there. I was at a conference a couple of weeks ago where half the audience (noo meeja) were Twittering & the other half (auld meeja) weren't. An eye-opener. And Twitter has actually demonstrated some ROI for me.

BTW My Twitter ID is innotecture if anyone wants to connect.

Cheers,

Matt

--- On Wed, 7/2/08, Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@knowfarm.com> wrote:
From: Peter Dorfman <pdorfman@knowfarm.com>
Subject: Re: [sikmleaders] Making SIKM Presentations More Widely Available
To: sikmleaders@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, July 2, 2008, 11:13 PM

I think the other members have put it pretty well. I'd say go for it. I might
even feel moved to blog.

Hey....how many of you Twitter? I've just tried it for the first time. I suppose
there might be lots of people who really need to tweet, have a practical reason
for it, but I don't, as a function of what I do, so it left me feeling just a
bit, how shall I put this...narcissistic ? Have you ever had that feeling about
any of these Web 2 gimmicks?

Peter Dorfman