Impact of remote work on knowledge transfer #remote-work #knowledge-transfer #knowledge-sharing


Mareike
 

Hello everyone,

I'm studying technical economics at the university of applied science and am currently working on my master thesis. Within the thesis I’d like to asses possible impact of remote work on knowledge transfer, especially on tacit knowledge. Is there any recommendation on literature, papers, cases studies regarding this topic? 


Your answer is very much appreciated 

Best regards,

Mareike


Gordon Vala-Webb
 
Edited

First, I hope you are reading Nonaka (and Takeuchi) so that you understand what they proposed in 

Nonaka and Takeuchi theorized that the creation of knowledge is the result of a continuous cycle of four integrated processes: externalization, internalization, combination, and socialization. These four knowledge conversion mechanisms are mutually complementary and interdependent that change according to the demands of context and sequence Source: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/history_knowledge/nonaka.html
This might be helpful:

Image source: https://medium.com/@jakobwolman/why-i-share-tacit-vs-explicit-knowledge-1783ba0ef2a0

2) You might want to take a look at "The Phases of Remote Adaptation" by Darren Murph (Jan 28 2021). He works at GitLab. I think it is an interesting guide as to how a company might move from "all in office(s)" to "all out of offices."  https://wrkfrce.com/the-phases-of-remote-adaptation/.
--
Gordon Vala-Webb
Building Smarter Organizations
How to lead your zombie organization back to life


Cindy Young
 
Edited

Gordon,
 
Love the SECI!  I wrote about Nonaka, Takeuchi, SECI, and so much more on my dissertation and I teach it in my course Beginning Your Knowledge Management Journey.
 
Regards,
Cindy

On Tue, Apr 13, 2021 at 9:15 AM Gordon Vala-Webb <gvalawebb@...> wrote:
First, I hope you are reading Nonaka (and Takeuk) so that you understand what they proposed in 

Nonaka and Takeuk theorized that the creation of knowledge is the result of a continuous cycle of four integrated processes: externalization, internalization, combination, and socialization. These four knowledge conversion mechanisms are mutually complementary and interdependent that change according to the demands of context and sequence Source: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/history_knowledge/nonaka.html
This might be helpful:

Image source: https://medium.com/@jakobwolman/why-i-share-tacit-vs-explicit-knowledge-1783ba0ef2a0

2) You might want to take a look at "The Phases of Remote Adaptation" by Darren Murph (Jan 28 2021). He works at GitLab. I think it is an interesting guide as to how a company might move from "all in office(s)" to "all out of offices."  https://wrkfrce.com/the-phases-of-remote-adaptation/.
--
Gordon Vala-Webb
Building Smarter Organizations
How to lead your zombie organization back to life