What is the current/future role of AI in the KM processes? #art-of-KM #AI #collaboration #methods #knowledge-capture


Ginetta Gueli
 

Dear SIKM leaders,
my name is Ginetta Gueli and I am information and Knowledge Manager.  I am currently co-working on a university research project in collaboration with prof. Luna Leoni (University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy).
As you may know, Industry 5.0 calls for the adoption of a human-centric approach for digital technologies (including artificial intelligence) that requires an upskilling and deskilling of the workers, particularly in terms of digital skills. All of this have an impact on the knowledge management of organizations and so on firms performance. However, it is still not clear if and how these new digital technologies may practically help knowledge managers in their job within organizations, facilitating and improving knowledge mining, management and dissemination. This is particularly true when referring to the role that Artificial intelligence (AI) may play in terms of Knowledge management (KM) practices within organizations. So our key starting question is: what is the current role of AI in the KM processes? And if none, what role AI will play in the future of KM? 
The topic is hot, and we aim to build a practical and concrete report (i.e. a paper) that can be useful to understand the status quo and the way forward.
In this respect we are looking for Knowledge Manager/KM professionals who are concretely implementing AI solutions in their organizations (no restrictions of size, country, type of business, etc.) and would like to get in contact with them to set up an interview.
If you are interested to know more on content, timing, privacy of the interview, etc., or you know anyone that could be, please drop me an email or answer to this thread by 31st July 2021. 
We are very much looking forward to hearing from you. 
Thank you for the positive consideration and kind regards,
Ginetta
NB: to know more us, please visit our IN profiles :-)
---
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


 

Ginetta - a couple of thoughts.

1. AI on its own still needs experts to tell it what to do! 
It’s unclear to me whether AI will have any particularly different role in enterprise KM than it does anywhere else its being successfully applied. Namely, AI provides a way to encode heuristics (from human experts) that are then used to process vast amounts of data at rates and volumes that are beyond the capabilities of a human. For example, UC Davis is working with wild land fire protection agencies to develop AI-based fire detection systems. https://wifire.ucsd.edu/commons. These systems rely heavily on experts to tell the AI what to look for. Without that initial seeding, the AI would be more prone to errors.

2. ML+AI = ??  
Adding ML (machine learning) to the wild land fire application might be effective, helping the AI get better at distinguishing between conditions that represent an imminent threat and those which do not. And perhaps that is where there might be an interesting impact on KM: an AI coupled with ML could teach itself to do things that an expert human operator would not have ever figured out (viz AlphaGo, for instance). Here, a KM function in an enterprise setting might be tasked with identifying the best use cases and opportunities to apply an AI+KM solution using criteria like speed, accuracy, cost-avoidance, etc. 


3.
 KM: it’s all about re-use! 
You wrote: >>>knowledge managers in their job within organizations, facilitating and improving knowledge mining, management and dissemination<<<

As a side note I’d add re-use to your list here. Collecting, organizing, and disseminating doesn’t result in value creation until re-use occurs. So monitoring, tracking and encouraging re-use is an important part of the knowledge manager’s job, I believe. 

Good luck with your efforts - let us know what you conclude and how it goes!
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Ginetta Gueli
 

Hello Tom,
thank you for your useful insights! Regarding points 1 and 2, definitively this is something that we would like to know more. At the moment we are in the explorative phase with a super open mind. Let's see what will be the results :-)

Regarding point 3: I could not agree more with you. Indeed I should include it and mhmm...does AI can help Kmanagers to do it better than now? Something to investigate on...

Thanks again for the good luck and keep you all posted.
All the best,
Ginetta

PS: the "Wifire" example looks interesting, I should contact them in case someone is willing to have an interview with us. If you know anybody, just let me know and I will try to contact him/her via LinkedIN? Tx!

--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


 

This may well be the killer use case for AI+KM: expertise location. Check it out: https://www.starmind.ai/oracle-partner-event
Thanks, Jonathan Gordon-Till, for the reference in this thread https://sikm.groups.io/g/main/message/9341

-- 
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Dennis Thomas
 

Hello Gueli,

From my perspective, the over riding issue of I4.0, 4th Industrial Revolution, Industry 4.0 is the convergence of IT (Information Technology) and OT (Operational Technologies. 

IT = AI, Internet of Things, Telecommunications (G5)
OT = Applications related to business strategies and human-centric issues

IT = logic based programming.  Requires self-consistency.  First order logic is A=B true/false, 2nd order logic is If this/than that, higher order logics gets into bayesian probabilities

As such, IT is designed to deliver consumption-based information. In effect, it treats people as if they were just another component of the technology.  It’s subtly dehumanizing. But,people trump IT, if they don’t like it, they won’t use it.  

OT is about Knowledge.  Knowledge has context, meaning, snd purpose.  It is both cognitive and explicit.  It has dependencies, contingencies, cross-silo, cross-functional, cross-reference, and causal dimensions.  Comprehension and understanding are knowledge oriented.  Critical thinking and problem solving are dependent upon it.  

IT does not have a clue of the meaning of words or their implications.  Computers do not learn.  They only recognize patterns.  Did you know that ChatBots were invented in 1964-1966?  Here we are more than 60 years later and they still do not understand language context or meaning.  Programming strips that away.  Conceptual graphs try to give language meaning, but word relationships with labels such as “city of,” “part of,” etc. is descriptive, not semantic.  

OT is about intricate cognitive systems, collaborative efforts, self-pased learning, business processes that achieve goals and objectives.  Most importantly, they have a rational component to them.  It is rationality that pierces our conceptual barriers to invent new paradigms of thought and possibilities.  Logic-based systems follow.  AI cannot and does not create.  That’s pure hype.

From my point if view, old school KM people will soon die off.  It is the younger, hipper, more tech savvy KM practitioners who will naturally think of OT as a solution.  Old school KM people will readily accept whatever IT people recommend.  Guess what IT people recommend.  More IT.  

The convergence of IT and OT is the happy middle ground.  Understand the playing field, Know that there are other options out there other than multi-million dollar Fortune 1000 data technologies.  Small and medium size companies my very well lead the KM charge out of its boxed canyon.  Know that OT can integrate RELEVANT data to make rational reasoning systems eclipse the fixed data interfaces populated with dead data that are boring users around the world.  We want dynamic, exciting, user-friendly knowledge systems.  

Dennis


-- 
DL Thomas

On July 9, 2021 at 6:45:47 AM, Ginetta Gueli via groups.io (ginetta.gueli@...) wrote:

Dear SIKM leaders,
my name is Ginetta Gueli and I am information and Knowledge Manager.  I am currently co-working on a university research project in collaboration with prof. Luna Leoni (University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy).
As you may know, Industry 5.0 calls for the adoption of a human-centric approach for digital technologies (including artificial intelligence) that requires an upskilling and deskilling of the workers, particularly in terms of digital skills. All of this have an impact on the knowledge management of organizations and so on firms performance. However, it is still not clear if and how these new digital technologies may practically help knowledge managers in their job within organizations, facilitating and improving knowledge mining, management and dissemination. This is particularly true when referring to the role that Artificial intelligence (AI) may play in terms of Knowledge management (KM) practices within organizations. So our key starting question is: what is the current role of AI in the KM processes? And if none, what role AI will play in the future of KM? 
The topic is hot, and we aim to build a practical and concrete report (i.e. a paper) that can be useful to understand the status quo and the way forward.
In this respect we are looking for Knowledge Manager/KM professionals who are concretely implementing AI solutions in their organizations (no restrictions of size, country, type of business, etc.) and would like to get in contact with them to set up an interview.
If you are interested to know more on content, timing, privacy of the interview, etc., or you know anyone that could be, please drop me an email or answer to this thread by 31st July 2021. 
We are very much looking forward to hearing from you. 
Thank you for the positive consideration and kind regards,
Ginetta
NB: to know more us, please visit our IN profiles :-)
---
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Ginetta Gueli
 

Hello Thomas,
I read with interest your point of view, mhmm fascinating. I tend to agree with most of what you wrote. In particularly when you say "Computers do not learn. They only recognize patterns.": I cannot agree more!

Based on my experience it is true that IT people recommend more IT to create the perfect KM system, but I have to admit that I had the pleasure to meet CIO and IT teams who were in the middle; not many I must say, but there are, and they are precious, because they are great KM partners.

This being said, I am not sure that all the youngers will think of OT as a solution and the old school KM people will soon die off. With more than 15 years of experience I can consider myself to be part of the 'old school', but I have to say that it does not depend on the generation you belong to: I met old school KMers that were more OT than IT and young people who were more IT than OT, and vice versa of course.

Again, thanks for your answer. I will definitively 'use' them as food for thought during our interviews. Let's see the results.

Have a great August and keep in touch.
All the best,
Ginetta

--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager


Dennis Thomas
 

Hello Ginetta,

Points well made.  I tend to be a bit provocative from time to time.  The “die” comment was a bit over the top and you are right to point it out.  Regarding IT/OT architects and programmers, our company has lost money on IT programmers who just could not understand the idea of rational processes versus logical processes. It took others time to peel back the onion before they understood.   Those where unexpected roadblocks that we could not afford at the time.  Otherwise, I believe a new era of technology is in process, and a big part of that is occurring in the manufacturing industry.  Some states have programs in place to help educate manufactures about the IT / OT convergence and how to understand and navigate the transition.  

I believe this is happening across all industries. Small businesses focus is on services and products, then they focus on business process, then on systems, then on the integration of systems, and so forth.  There is a clear maturation process that occurs as revenues and incomes increase.  The question is, from our point of view, what kinds of OT can best accommodate these transitions?  We believe that no code / low code is the answer on the low end, and more sophisticated integrations as the systems grow in complexity.  For us, this means starting with systems that are Controlled Vocabulary-driven rather than taxonomy-driven as with AI and NLP (Natural Language Processing) systems.  This brings us to the point of the Linguistic-Semantic Gap. 

The linguistic-semantic gap is the friction point between IT and OT.  IT utilizes taxonomies for the machine side, then tries to map those stripped down bits and bytes to the human user side.  Something gets lost in the translation.  What gets lost is the context, meaning, and purpose of the concepts people know and understand.   So the question then becomes, how can a machine faithfully represent concepts and ideas?  What are those?  IT excels with modeling the physical world.  There are objects, attributes (physical and semiotic) and processes - be they logistics of manufacturing, assembly, packaging and shipping.   When it comes to semiotics (refers to, or references something else), the challenge becomes more complex, and finally, when we get into metaphysics we are in crazy space.  But, we need to get there. 

My vision of KM Future technology are screens that are concept-driven.  They are knowledge driven and interact with people as if their were an associate or subject matter expert on any subject.  They educate and convey simple to complex subjects in a language that people know and understand.  They excite, surprise, encourage, stimulate, entice, expose new vistas of discovery.  I like the Nancy Dixon's series on Organizational Dialogue, Guy Wallaces’s persistent messages about Instructional Systems Design and task/process modeling that reflects organizational goals and objective, Arthur Shelley Organizational Zoo, and Milton/Lambe ISO work, Patty Shanks work with Multiple Choice Questions, and many others.  Their work, as with many others, is hero work.  It is highly rational.  It cuts new ground, it proves out human intelligence,  IT is trying to kill it. 

Finally, attached are two graphics that relate to this discussion.  Not sure they will go through.  

Dennis L. Thomas
IQStrategix
(810) 662-5199

Leveraging Organizational Knowledge 

On August 17, 2021 at 9:23:58 AM, Ginetta Gueli via groups.io (ginetta.gueli@...) wrote:

Hello Thomas,
I read with interest your point of view, mhmm fascinating. I tend to agree with most of what you wrote. In particularly when you say "Computers do not learn. They only recognize patterns.": I cannot agree more!

Based on my experience it is true that IT people recommend more IT to create the perfect KM system, but I have to admit that I had the pleasure to meet CIO and IT teams who were in the middle; not many I must say, but there are, and they are precious, because they are great KM partners.

This being said, I am not sure that all the youngers will think of OT as a solution and the old school KM people will soon die off. With more than 15 years of experience I can consider myself to be part of the 'old school', but I have to say that it does not depend on the generation you belong to: I met old school KMers that were more OT than IT and young people who were more IT than OT, and vice versa of course.

Again, thanks for your answer. I will definitively 'use' them as food for thought during our interviews. Let's see the results.

Have a great August and keep in touch.
All the best,
Ginetta

--
Ginetta Gueli
Information & Knowledge Manager | Project Manager