Digital Asset Management and Knowledge Re-use: webinars #knowledge-reuse #webinar


Laura Zorrilla Fernandez
 

Dear group members, 
hoping to gather some collective wisdom from all of you.
We are a capacity development facility that was used to conducting training face to face. We had invested heavily into knowledge capture tools but due to COVID, in the last 1.5 years most of our training and knowledge exchange takes place in an online environment using Zoom meetings or webinars. These meetings and webinars are being recorded, and we are accumulating quite a library.
I am now tasked with 2 tasks 1) storage 2) knowledge re-use, which would take the form of "clippings" from the videos. 
Are some of you facing a similar experience? Anyone got practices to share in terms of 1) what storage solutions are needed? 2) data privacy for the re-use of recordings (we already ask the permission for people to be recorded but not to be re-used) 3) Any video editing software you can recommend aside from the usual Adobe and CANVA? 4) general digital asset management policy
Thanks a lot for any tips or comments!


David Kamien
 

Hi Laura: Sounds like you have a valuable corpus. We have built a question database on top of knowledge graph architecture. Also, we could build you a text analytics solution that would extract Question and Answer pairs from unstructured text documents, and possibly even generate questions that are answered in the text. In your case I assume we'd be dealing with transcripts. If this is of interest to you, feel free to call me at 212-920-1911 or email david@...


David

On Wed, Dec 15, 2021 at 6:38 AM Laura Zorrilla Fernandez <laura.zorrilla-fernandez@...> wrote:
Dear group members, 
hoping to gather some collective wisdom from all of you.
We are a capacity development facility that was used to conducting training face to face. We had invested heavily into knowledge capture tools but due to COVID, in the last 1.5 years most of our training and knowledge exchange takes place in an online environment using Zoom meetings or webinars. These meetings and webinars are being recorded, and we are accumulating quite a library.
I am now tasked with 2 tasks 1) storage 2) knowledge re-use, which would take the form of "clippings" from the videos. 
Are some of you facing a similar experience? Anyone got practices to share in terms of 1) what storage solutions are needed? 2) data privacy for the re-use of recordings (we already ask the permission for people to be recorded but not to be re-used) 3) Any video editing software you can recommend aside from the usual Adobe and CANVA? 4) general digital asset management policy
Thanks a lot for any tips or comments!


 
Edited

Laura wrote:
>>>I am now tasked with 2 tasks 1) storage 2) knowledge re-use, which would take the form of "clippings" from the videos. <<<

Hello Laura - Companies have wrestled with video-based knowledge capture, storage, and retrieval for 40 years. The good news is that capture and storage have both gotten a lot easier and cheaper during that time. And automated transcript generation has made it searchable in ways that were all but impossible (or expensive and unscalable) a few decades ago. 

I think your first challenge is to come up with the personas and use cases for your DAM/KM video solution. How exactly do you envision these video clips being used, and by whom, in what circumstances? 

A video collection like the one you're proposing may be thought of like a 1000-piece jigsaw puzzle, where each clip represents one of the puzzle pieces. As you work on assembling the puzzle, there is only one "right" puzzle piece for each open spot you are pondering. The pieces are all in a jumble, and look more or less the same, so the trick is figuring out how to find that one right piece to fit the open slot. 

For video clips, the challenge would be to have a very tightly described question that can be answered by a single "right" answer, without ambiguity. When I was with an electric utility, we were working on developing a video archive of procedures that lineworkers in the field could use to show them how to do things like replace a 600v breaker switch without de-energizing the panel it was in. There is only one right way to do it safely, and less experienced workers were not allowed to do this work without oversight, as the steps were not obvious or similar to other procedures they were familiar with. 

So that was a good candidate for a video tutorial. The trick was, of course, overcoming numerous hurdles to building and rolling out such a solution, and making it actually useful:

  1. Making lineworkers in the field aware of the existence of the tool
  2. Ensuring they had access to the tool on some device that they all would have with them; and they could get the needed content anywhere, including remote locations
  3. Making it easy to find to the needed content without a lot of searching
  4. Creating and vetting the content to ensure it was correct; and precise enough that the consumer of it would not have to wade through large amounts of info that was not relevant to their specific question. 

A solution like the one @David Kamien describes could be very helpful in addressing point 3. Point 2 is probably not an issue for you. Your challenge will be in navigating points 1 and 4, particularly point 4. Use cases and personas might help with identifying the right clips to harvest, and the right length of those clips for your target users. 

You may want to trial a few Q&A clips to see how they are received - put them in an FAQ and distribute it. At some point you may find there are other solutions that are just as effective and less work to implement.

--
-Tom
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Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

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