KM Technology Trends #tools #discussion-starter #state-of-KM


Stan Garfield
 

Jean-Claude Monney and I had a good chat today. One of the things we discussed was the latest technology trends in KM.  I have written about this (e.g., What are the trends in KM, and what does the future hold?), as have others (e.g., 17 Hot KM Trends for 2022 by Tim Eisenhauer).  Relevant SIKM discussions can be found at #state-of-KM and #tools.

In my post (written in 2017) I listed these ten trends:
  1. Digital workplace and digital transformation
  2. Working Out Loud (WOL) and narrating your work
  3. Community management
  4. Cognitive computing and artificial intelligence (AI)
  5. Analytics and business intelligence
  6. Enterprise Social Networks (ESNs)
  7. Chat tools such as Slack
  8. Gamification and digital badging
  9. Agile methodology
  10. Mobile apps and bring your own device (BYOD)

I would like your help in starting a discussion.  Please reply with your lists, links, and thoughts on this.  Thanks!


Andy Farnsworth
 

Hey Stan, interesting topic!

I've been thinking (and working) a lot lately on building KM practices into org operating systems using no-code tools. Coda, notion, airtable etc. give teams unprecedented control to design and implement processes to suit their specific needs and working styles.

It's great from a consulting standpoint, because I can sneak automated issue and reflection surfacing into task management systems. It's like stealth KM. Also allows smaller orgs to build components of a KM system without paying for large, static software packages.
--
---
Andy Farnsworth
Morning Strategy


 

Interesting riff, Stan. Seems like fertile territory to explore (so long as we can avoid the treachorous black hole of debate that is defining KM and knowledge, that is). 

As a thought experiment, perhaps we could get some clarity on your question by going back in time to say, 1980. The first question would be: was anyone doing knowledge management then? If they were, then what tools and techniques were routinely being used, and what emerging tech was coming in to enhance or disrupt the practice of KM back then? 

And if we believe that no one was doing KM back then, then how did companies keep from having to start over again every time they wanted to build a new factory, or improve a work process? Or find internally the expert on a given topic?

My point is that I believe organizations of all kinds have been doing knowledge management since the beginning of organizations. Making sure they keep track of best practices, keeping an inventory of who knows what, managing their social networks and communities of expertise, looking for lessons learned - all of these are natural human tendencies. And imho they all transcend KM - they are simply ways of organzing, managing and coordinating large numbers of people toward a common purpose. 

If that be true, then the notion of specific technology trends in KM is either very narrow or all-encompassing. Some companies use Slack well, some poorly, some not at all. The same can be said of all the items on the above list - with or without any thought of KM at all. 

Therefore, I'm not clear how any of those can be proprietarily claimed as "KM technologies". 

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Howie Cohen
 

All,

 

        I am very interested in this subject and I am looking forward to the responses.

 

--Howie Cohen

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Short
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2022 5:59 PM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] KM Technology Trends #tools #discussion-starter #state-of-KM

 

Interesting riff, Stan. Seems like fertile territory to explore (so long as we can avoid the treachorous black hole of debate that is defining KM and knowledge, that is). 

As a thought experiment, perhaps we could get some clarity on your question by going back in time to say, 1980. The first question would be: was anyone doing knowledge management then? If they were, then what tools and techniques were routinely being used, and what emerging tech was coming in to enhance or disrupt the practice of KM back then? 

And if we believe that no one was doing KM back then, then how did companies keep from having to start over again every time they wanted to build a new factory, or improve a work process? Or find internally the expert on a given topic?

My point is that I believe organizations of all kinds have been doing knowledge management since the beginning of organizations. Making sure they keep track of best practices, keeping an inventory of who knows what, managing their social networks and communities of expertise, looking for lessons learned - all of these are natural human tendencies. And imho they all transcend KM - they are simply ways of organzing, managing and coordinating large numbers of people toward a common purpose. 

If that be true, then the notion of specific technology trends in KM is either very narrow or all-encompassing. Some companies use Slack well, some poorly, some not at all. The same can be said of all the items on the above list - with or without any thought of KM at all. 

Therefore, I'm not clear how any of those can be proprietarily claimed as "KM technologies". 

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Rezwan Alam
 

While KM technology tools are great, too much of it in the market are also not fully helping organisations. 
All are excited about AI, however, I would rather put my faith on HI: human intelligence, because data don't provide full context or emotional/ behavioural aspects.
best,
Rezwan
Knowledge City Dhaka.


On Sat, Aug 13, 2022, 4:49 AM Howie Cohen <howardscohenmba@...> wrote:

All,

 

        I am very interested in this subject and I am looking forward to the responses.

 

--Howie Cohen

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Short
Sent: Friday, August 12, 2022 5:59 PM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] KM Technology Trends #tools #discussion-starter #state-of-KM

 

Interesting riff, Stan. Seems like fertile territory to explore (so long as we can avoid the treachorous black hole of debate that is defining KM and knowledge, that is). 

As a thought experiment, perhaps we could get some clarity on your question by going back in time to say, 1980. The first question would be: was anyone doing knowledge management then? If they were, then what tools and techniques were routinely being used, and what emerging tech was coming in to enhance or disrupt the practice of KM back then? 

And if we believe that no one was doing KM back then, then how did companies keep from having to start over again every time they wanted to build a new factory, or improve a work process? Or find internally the expert on a given topic?

My point is that I believe organizations of all kinds have been doing knowledge management since the beginning of organizations. Making sure they keep track of best practices, keeping an inventory of who knows what, managing their social networks and communities of expertise, looking for lessons learned - all of these are natural human tendencies. And imho they all transcend KM - they are simply ways of organzing, managing and coordinating large numbers of people toward a common purpose. 

If that be true, then the notion of specific technology trends in KM is either very narrow or all-encompassing. Some companies use Slack well, some poorly, some not at all. The same can be said of all the items on the above list - with or without any thought of KM at all. 

Therefore, I'm not clear how any of those can be proprietarily claimed as "KM technologies". 

--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Douglas Kalish
 

Great topic and pretty interesting that the list from five years ago is still very relevant. For a 2022 list, I’d include these five trends:
* Automation of knowledge sharing processes using low/no-code automation tools
* Employee experience focus for KM process and system improvements 
* Agile IT approach for managing backlog of enhancements and implementation 
* Integration of chatbot experience with knowledge search
* Search engine optimization 


Valdis Krebs
 

>> "While KM technology tools are great, too much of it in the market are also not fully helping organisations. 
All are excited about AI, however, I would rather put my faith on HI: human intelligence, because data don't provide full context or emotional/ behavioural aspects."

Exactly, Rezwan!

As I always say … In organizations, Sociology  >>  Technology 

[In Math, >> means "much greater than", in the above sentence it means "much more important than"]

Valdis

Valdis Krebs
Orgnet, LLC


Robert M. Taylor
 

The personal/community/collaboration analytics space looks interesting. We've had the idea of social network analysis a long time but I don't think it's been packaged until recently. I'm thinking of the analytics I see in M365 of my network and collaboration, and other tools that have come to market. Of course, people don't live their whole working lives online, and their different presences may be hard to all link in, but we're seeing the start of something more interesting here. It's not quite there yet ...

Obviously there's been a huge move to online communication and collaboration, but email clings on and users' digital literacy holds them back.

I'd still like to see someone sort out both allowing users to make random folders, which they love to do. whilst at the same time having content tagged and organised for them behind the scenes. 

Microsoft rethinking Office to integrate the apps more into the flow with Loop https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-loop?ms.url=microsoftcommicrosoft-loop is interesting. I don't know how far it will go but the fluidity I think we're reaching for is the ability to create any kind of content type and do with it what we like without flipping in and out of apps and having to manage what is where. I mean like I suddently decide to do this reply as a picture; or a video recording; which I turn into a conversation; then send it to whatever channel in whatever form. Hmm


 
Edited

I wonder if new org designs fits under KM's purview? First there was outsourcing, then increased use of independent contractors. During which Zappos was experimenting with their leaderless organization approach. Pandemic-driven WFH has accelerated the transformation of knowledge work into modules that are movable from one worker to the next.
 
Why should companies limit themselves to only the employees (or contractors) they already have on their payroll when it comes to getting work done effectively and efficiently? And how much overhead cost could be reduced or eliminated completely if decision rights were managed in a more decentralized fashion?
 
To me these are interesting trends and questions that KM could and arguably should have a perspective on. 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Tom,

Absolutely. Any time you wish to involve yourself in system outcomes, whether they are "your" staff or not, that's a valid application of Knowledge Management.

One of the more interesting pieces of work I did early in my KM career was an assessment of how to apply KM to "extension" work in an agricultural context.

For those unfamiliar, the paradigm used in agriculture is Research, Development and Extension (RD&E). This combines traditional R&D with the process of proselytising and increasing uptake of new tools and techniques that improve productivity among the agricultural community. Sometimes this was direct-to-farmer; other times through trusted intermediaries. In other words, it's about ecosystem behaviour change when you have ongoing relationships, but little ability to direct.

It is obviously essential to understand that techniques you might use in an organisational context would be completely ineffective in this kind of situation.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 16/08/2022 2:52 am, Tom Short wrote:

I wonder if new org designs fits under KM's purview? First there was outsourcing, then increased use of independent contractors. During which Zappos was experimenting with their leaderless organization approach. Pandemic-driven WFH has accelerated the transformation of knowledge work into modules that are movable from one worker to the next.
 
Why should companies limit themselves to only the employees (or contractors) they already have on their payroll, when it comes to getting work done effectively and efficiently? And how much overhead cost could be reduced or eliminated completely if decision rights were managed in a more decentralized fashion?
 
To me these are interesting trends and questions that KM could and arguably should have a perspective on. 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


 

Thanks Stan,
I was looking at which technology is advancing any of the KM solutions to create, share , access, grow knowledge, collaborate, etc... Here are a few of them.

  1. The Metaverse - Already Accenture has created an onboarding virtual campus called the N floor using Metaverse. Accenture's challenge in transferring company knowledge to their 100,000 new hire per year and is partially addressed with that new technology.  Going Beyond with Extended Reality | Accenture
  2. Low-code solutions -  you can automate your search, build your own alerts, integrated knowledge flow, etc... For people using the MSFT stack, PowerApp is the new killer app. If you can describe the process, you can build the app, almost no coding skills required. Business Apps | Microsoft Power Apps
  3. AI as technology umbrella is being infused in almost all work and KM processes.  There is the advancement of ML models like BERT and GPT-3 combined with Silicon accelerators. Here are a few selected ones:
    1. Graph technologies for knowledge sharing - Being able to build relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge and organize it in a way you can access it more easily is really evolving.  Generic tools like Neo4J  or for people on the MSFT stack with Viva Topics
    2. NLP for Search relevance  - Example like Sinequa Neural Search
    3. Ai Cognitive services for knowledge mining. Vision, language, etc.. We see example in for consumers like ability do do visual search on Google or Bing, or Voice assistant like Siri and Alexa but little in the enterprise side. 
  4. Collaboration solutions as a suite with examples like Notion or Viva

I'm sure there are many more, remembering the words fo wisdom from Carla O'Dell, it's the people that make the system works...


Karen Budelier Brown
 

Love Carla's quote. She is spot on. What is KM without the people!

On Thu, Aug 18, 2022 at 4:11 PM Jean-Claude F. Monney <Jean-Claude@...> wrote:
Thanks Stan,
I was looking at which technology is advancing any of the KM solutions to create, share , access, grow knowledge, collaborate, etc... Here are a few of them.

  1. The Metaverse - Already Accenture has created an onboarding virtual campus called the N floor using Metaverse. Accenture's challenge in transferring company knowledge to their 100,000 new hire per year and is partially addressed with that new technology.  Going Beyond with Extended Reality | Accenture
  2. Low-code solutions -  you can automate your search, build your own alerts, integrated knowledge flow, etc... For people using the MSFT stack, PowerApp is the new killer app. If you can describe the process, you can build the app, almost no coding skills required. Business Apps | Microsoft Power Apps
  3. AI as technology umbrella is being infused in almost all work and KM processes.  There is the advancement of ML models like BERT and GPT-3 combined with Silicon accelerators. Here are a few selected ones:
    1. Graph technologies for knowledge sharing - Being able to build relationship between tacit and explicit knowledge and organize it in a way you can access it more easily is really evolving.  Generic tools like Neo4J  or for people on the MSFT stack with Viva Topics
    2. NLP for Search relevance  - Example like Sinequa Neural Search
    3. Ai Cognitive services for knowledge mining. Vision, language, etc.. We see example in for consumers like ability do do visual search on Google or Bing, or Voice assistant like Siri and Alexa but little in the enterprise side. 
  4. Collaboration solutions as a suite with examples like Notion or Viva

I'm sure there are many more, remembering the words fo wisdom from Carla O'Dell, it's the people that make the system works...

--
Karen Budelier Brown


Robert M. Taylor
 

The personal/community/collaboration analytics space looks interesting. We've had the idea of social network analysis a long time but I don't think it's been packaged until recently. I'm thinking of the analytics I see in M365 of my network and collaboration, and other tools that have come to market. Of course, people don't live their whole working lives online, and their different presences may be hard to all link in, but we're seeing the start of something more interesting here.

Obviously there's been a huge move to online communication and collaboration.

I'd still like to see someone sort out both allowing users to make random folders whilst at the same time tagging content behind the scenes. 

Microsoft rethinking Office to integrate the apps more into the flow