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Comms and messaging plan/approach for KM team #communications


Vandana Wadhawan
 

Hi all,

I’m need help around various approaches that a KM team can adopt to increase their visibility within an enterprise!

Has anyone worked on a strategy for Comms & messaging around KM solutions their team provided?

Please share what approaches, strategy and methods worked for you!

Regards,
Vandana


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Vandana W


Nikhil Katyal
 

Hi Vandana - KM team's visibility within an enterprise has been a main challenge I too have faced. We adopted an approach which comprised of multiple actions. In fact we even measured the trust/perception as it moved upward via a mid-year and annual survey.
1. Perception building comms - There was a lot of good work happening in terms of content improvement. But no one knew. We started creating simple (creative) email comms which highlighted the enhanced content and what had improved (less word count, better layout, etc.)
2. Created a strong feedback management frame work - every time someone had feedback on the KB content, we would acknowledge it right from the time it was received, to when it was picked, to outcome details. Even if the feedback was rejected (not applicable, incorrect, etc.) we would go back to the initiator. "Closing the loop".
3. Adopted Communities of Practice approach - created a group of ambassadors for the KB tool. Who were our eyes and ears on the Ops floor.
4. Recognise Chief collaborators - people who shared genuine and useful input on KB improvements were recognised on various company platforms.
These were the top few that I could immediately recall and know for sure that worked very well for us.


Dan Ranta
 

Hi Vandana - a typical or sample set of swim lanes (strategic focus areas) for your overall KM Strategy definitely needs to include communication / branding / training.  Below it's number 9 on this sample list, but that is not reflective of the importance.  I recommend a sturdy communication plan that starts with identifying stakeholders in groupings, then identifying communication / branding channels / mediums, then matching constituents with channels (how they will participate - RACI, for example) and then the fourth piece is executing and measuring your results and remaining agile.  For this communication plan, if interested, I can share a template with you that is "paint by numbers."  Best, Dan

TYPICAL KM STRATEGIC FOCUS AREAS
1.KM Team – Operating Model
2.Collaborative Culture
3.Business Alignment
4.KM Awards / Incentives
5.Communities / Networks
6.Technology
7.Content / Taxonomy / Search
8.Expertise Identification
9.KM Communication / Branding / Training 

On Thu, Mar 25, 2021 at 8:40 AM Nikhil Katyal <nikhil.katyal@...> wrote:
Hi Vandana - KM team's visibility within an enterprise has been a main challenge I too have faced. We adopted an approach which comprised of multiple actions. In fact we even measured the trust/perception as it moved upward via a mid-year and annual survey.
1. Perception building comms - There was a lot of good work happening in terms of content improvement. But no one knew. We started creating simple (creative) email comms which highlighted the enhanced content and what had improved (less word count, better layout, etc.)
2. Created a strong feedback management frame work - every time someone had feedback on the KB content, we would acknowledge it right from the time it was received, to when it was picked, to outcome details. Even if the feedback was rejected (not applicable, incorrect, etc.) we would go back to the initiator. "Closing the loop".
3. Adopted Communities of Practice approach - created a group of ambassadors for the KB tool. Who were our eyes and ears on the Ops floor.
4. Recognise Chief collaborators - people who shared genuine and useful input on KB improvements were recognised on various company platforms.
These were the top few that I could immediately recall and know for sure that worked very well for us.



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Daniel Ranta
Mobile:  603 384 3308


Dennis Pearce
 

I've been lucky to work with great internal comms people in two different organizations.  In both cases we were working on building out intranets and enterprise social networks where Comms would own the content on the home page.  It's good if you can find the "What's In It For Me?" motivator, which in this case was always increasing readership of their stories and announcements.  I would often use the analogy that comms articles are like billboards rather than destinations: Nobody sets out on a trip to visit a billboard, but they will certainly read one while on the way to somewhere else.  So if you can design the home page as the go-to, start-your-day portal to all the other places employees need to go to do their work, they are much more likely to read that content as it catches their eye along the way.

Once they got this idea, they always became much more interested topics like navigation and taxonomy.  For example, a good metadata structure allows tagging of stories which presents the opportunity for employees to read similar older stories that they might have missed.  Getting people to blog creates a set of articles that Comms can then harvest and showcase on the home page, lessening their need to come up with their own content.  Basically, I always tried to frame the things I wanted to accomplish in a way that would illustrate how it would help them do their own jobs.  This meant that over time, they were much quicker to ask the KM team for help when they had ideas for things they wanted to implement.


Stan Garfield