Topics

Knowledge sharing culture #culture #trust #collaboration


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


Matt Moore
 

Stacie,

I think you need to start with what the actual culture of the organization is. How do people collaborate already? What do they value?

Pretty much all cultures are already “knowledge sharing” in some way - altho the who, what, how, when, where & why of it may not be to either the liking of senior management or meeting the needs of the organization going forward.

Typically, I would try to find existing knowledge sharing activities and build of those. Can we do a bit more of them or include new groups of people? What are the barriers that stop people doing this? (In my experience, everyone says it’s because they don’t have the perfect technology but that is rarely the true reason).

Or if some new change (creating a new product, entering a new market) required new forms of knowledge sharing, I would do it as part of that initiative. I probably wouldn’t call it “knowledge sharing” tho. I would brand it as “doing your job”.

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On Mar 5, 2021, at 7:53 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541@...> wrote:

Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Stacie,

To be honest, I'm not a fan of a blanket promotion of "knowledge sharing" or creating a "knowledge sharing culture". It's much better to (a) identify business problems and then (b) examine whether knowledge sharing is a contributor to that problem.

Even where knowledge sharing is a problem, the answer may not be pre-emptive sharing of knowledge. It could be better to encourage just-in-time knowledge seeking or "stand up" protocols to support regular knowledge exchange. It's necessary to look at costs and benefits to see if the time spent sharing is actually making the organisation more productive.

And even this glosses over the fundamental drivers of worker behaviour that may significantly or entirely inhibit knowledge sharing regardless of the topic in question:

1. Psychosocial safety
2. Engagement
3. Capability
4. Motivation
5. Psychological distance

This may be more than you wanted to hear! But I do think that successful knowledge sharing programs have to designed with care and intent, and may of an organisation, rather than as a one-size-fits-all generic program.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 5/03/2021 6:53 am, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io wrote:

Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Hi Stacie,

Over the last two decades, I’ve attempted to bring about a “knowledge sharing” culture in a bunch of organisations through various methods. While the basics are likely to include orientation, motivation, leadership influence, process design, technology enablement, checking for values and work philosophy at the time of hiring etc, one of the things I worked on in 2018 was conduct workshops for small leadership teams representing a business unit and help them navigate to the knowledge sharing activities they would have to engage in, in order to achieve a certain business objective. It was a detailed methodology and a half-day workshop with templates, models etc. I think it was well-received as it wasn’t seen to be a “preaching” session or something outside of work!

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 5 Mar 2021 at 2:23 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Patrick Lambe
 

I agree Nirmala. 

I tend to see culture as a set of engrained habits (including habits of thought and value), so systems and processes and rules provide a kind of exoskeleton for culture. 

However culture cannot be separated from people and their actions and behaviours, and it depends very highly on “influential” people. So engaging leadership teams in dialogue about what behaviours they want to see and are prepared to demonstrate themselves (and permit or not permit) is very powerful.

Of course we shouldn’t forget that influential people exist at all levels in the organisation. 

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 5 Mar 2021, at 12:45 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

Hi Stacie,

Over the last two decades, I’ve attempted to bring about a “knowledge sharing” culture in a bunch of organisations through various methods. While the basics are likely to include orientation, motivation, leadership influence, process design, technology enablement, checking for values and work philosophy at the time of hiring etc, one of the things I worked on in 2018 was conduct workshops for small leadership teams representing a business unit and help them navigate to the knowledge sharing activities they would have to engage in, in order to achieve a certain business objective. It was a detailed methodology and a half-day workshop with templates, models etc. I think it was well-received as it wasn’t seen to be a “preaching” session or something outside of work!

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 5 Mar 2021 at 2:23 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Nirmala Palaniappan
 

Yes, Patrick. I have had frustrating experiences because of the unavailability of leaders for such dialogues or just because it is hard for us to see what is happening within their own teams (post discussions). However, I have seen some powerful examples of leaders walking the talk as well :-)

On Fri, 5 Mar 2021 at 10:35 AM, Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
I agree Nirmala. 

I tend to see culture as a set of engrained habits (including habits of thought and value), so systems and processes and rules provide a kind of exoskeleton for culture. 

However culture cannot be separated from people and their actions and behaviours, and it depends very highly on “influential” people. So engaging leadership teams in dialogue about what behaviours they want to see and are prepared to demonstrate themselves (and permit or not permit) is very powerful.

Of course we shouldn’t forget that influential people exist at all levels in the organisation. 

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 5 Mar 2021, at 12:45 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

Hi Stacie,

Over the last two decades, I’ve attempted to bring about a “knowledge sharing” culture in a bunch of organisations through various methods. While the basics are likely to include orientation, motivation, leadership influence, process design, technology enablement, checking for values and work philosophy at the time of hiring etc, one of the things I worked on in 2018 was conduct workshops for small leadership teams representing a business unit and help them navigate to the knowledge sharing activities they would have to engage in, in order to achieve a certain business objective. It was a detailed methodology and a half-day workshop with templates, models etc. I think it was well-received as it wasn’t seen to be a “preaching” session or something outside of work!

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 5 Mar 2021 at 2:23 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous

--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous


Dan Ranta
 

Exactly as Patrick says.  Then, you can work to encourage leaders to reward your brokers (energy-givers with can-do attitudes) as transparently as possible so others say "oh, I can do that too!"  It becomes a contagious better way of working.  In a sense, it's a challenge of human engineering.  As Gladwell wrote about in 2001, find the connectors, salespeople, mavens...to create a positive epidemic.

image.png


On Thu, Mar 4, 2021 at 11:05 PM Patrick Lambe <plambe@...> wrote:
I agree Nirmala. 

I tend to see culture as a set of engrained habits (including habits of thought and value), so systems and processes and rules provide a kind of exoskeleton for culture. 

However culture cannot be separated from people and their actions and behaviours, and it depends very highly on “influential” people. So engaging leadership teams in dialogue about what behaviours they want to see and are prepared to demonstrate themselves (and permit or not permit) is very powerful.

Of course we shouldn’t forget that influential people exist at all levels in the organisation. 

P

Patrick Lambe
Partner
Straits Knowledge

phone:  +65 98528511

web:  www.straitsknowledge.com
resources:  www.greenchameleon.com
knowledge mapping:  www.aithinsoftware.com


On 5 Mar 2021, at 12:45 PM, Nirmala Palaniappan <nirmala.pal@...> wrote:

Hi Stacie,

Over the last two decades, I’ve attempted to bring about a “knowledge sharing” culture in a bunch of organisations through various methods. While the basics are likely to include orientation, motivation, leadership influence, process design, technology enablement, checking for values and work philosophy at the time of hiring etc, one of the things I worked on in 2018 was conduct workshops for small leadership teams representing a business unit and help them navigate to the knowledge sharing activities they would have to engage in, in order to achieve a certain business objective. It was a detailed methodology and a half-day workshop with templates, models etc. I think it was well-received as it wasn’t seen to be a “preaching” session or something outside of work!

Regards
Nirmala 

On Fri, 5 Mar 2021 at 2:23 AM, Stacie Jordan Brenkovich via groups.io <sj541=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi everyone - I know this has been a popular topic for this group over the past several years but wanted to re-engage around it.  What are you finding most successful when it comes to encouraging people to contribute their expertise/content and promote a culture of sharing?  There are lots of levers we are all aware of (rewards/recognition, leader support, communications, training, performance mgmt, compliance, etc.) but what have you seen work the best in your organization and how have you been able to implement it?   What are new, innovative ideas people have?  

Thanks, Stacie


--
"The faithful see the invisible, believe the incredible and then receive the impossible" - Anonymous



--
Daniel Ranta
Mobile:  603 384 3308


Abbe Wiesenthal
 

This is such a great question, and one I wrestled with at WarnerMedia. Here are some of the incentives I used to get people to buy into a culture of knowledge sharing:

1. Rewards and recognition: I wrote in a previous topic about opening up my Acronym/Glossary/Application & Systems Lists to crowdsourcing, I recognized contributors by using our internal rewards program, which awarded points that could be redeemed by gift cards. (It also had an internal "feed" that was very twitter-like so that everyone could see all the rewarded contributors.) For frequent contributors, I sent a "Kudos!" email to their manager, and reminded them to include their efforts on their self-evaluations at end of year.

2. "Publicity": As with many companies, we had digital signage installed in multiple places. I asked for a divisional "channel" to be created on the signage app. I then created a series of on-screen slides that highlighted solutions and innovations created by our team members. For example, an engineer in LA built a remote control that raised and lowered a news camera on a mount depending on on-air talent positioning, so that engineers don't have to run on and off the set to re-position the camera. This was adopted by the other news bureaus, and the inventor got tons of recognition for it. This was probably the most popular  method, judging from the feedback.

3. Career Advancement: The Knowledge Center I created stored "modules" for self-learning, such as "Video over IP", one of the most important media technology upgrades of the past 5 years. Supplemental to in-person classes, the IT Engineers received credit for completing the online training that counted toward their performance rating.

4. "Get to Know Me": I have a list of 100 questions. Each month I would ask a person who had been an enthusiastic KM proponent to be the subject of a feature. They are asked to answer any ten questions from the list, and I published an article including the 10 answers, plus a paragraph describing how that person uses the KM system in their job.

5. KM Home Page as a Destination: Our "Knowledge Trove" home page had several sections meant to draw people to the site. For example, a list of curated links, updated every couple of days, to news/happenings from all over WarnerMedia. Since there were an overwhelming number of places to go to for company news; I chose the most pertinent (usually, though not always, tech-related) and updated them frequently. The home page also introduced new employees/promotions, etc. plus some static content such as "How to Write a Great Self-Evaluation" or "Groups Responsible for Data Center Access".

These are just some of the methods I used to drive people to, support and contribute to the Knowledge Trove.

Abbe


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Thank you Matt for your insights, yes definitely agree with aligning to the current org culture, great point.  


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Thank you Nirmala, great tangible example and good to hear you found some success with that type of "teach me to fish" approach.  


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Thanks Abbe for sharing what's worked well for you in the past, great idea on the publicity and leveraging internal rewards system/ the twitter like feed making those folks more visible across the organization. 


Stan Garfield
 


Peter-Anthony Glick
 

Thank you Stan for alerting me of this discussion on my favourite topic, and for reconnecting me with the SIKM group! Last time I engaged with all of you could be 10yrs ago!
Firstly, you will find here my latest article which prompted Stan to inform me of this thread: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-important-culture-digital-transformation-peter-anthony-glick/

Stacie, I read the responses you got so far and agree with most of them.  Nirmala and Patrick are right in highlighting the importance of culture.   In fact, to me this is the key to success for knowledge sharing to truly permeates an entire organisation and for the relevant behaviours to stick for the long term.
As Stephen alludes to, it should not be about knowledge sharing for knowledge sharing sake.  People will naturally share their knowledge if the working environment makes it the "right" thing to do.  And I not only mean right for the organisation, but right for the individuals first! 
Since my early years engaging with this group, I have evolved my thinking on this and realise that focusing on knowledge processes was missing the big picture.  What we (KMers) should focus on instead is on how to establish a collaborative culture.  With such a culture, knowledge sharing becomes the way to do business.   As Matt writes, collaborating becomes an integral part of your job.
In a truly collaborative culture, all the levers you have already mentioned in this thread (Abbe gives a good list) will be common place.  I would point out that Rewards & Recognition for collaborative behaviours should be part of the normal performance assessment.  I don't believe at all in separate gamification systems such as the one you mention Abbe.  A collaborative culture starts at the recruitment stage with job descriptions stipulating the desired behaviours and mindset.  Then, everyone is expected to embrace the collaborative mindset to be successful, including pay rises and promotions.  
I have been with bp since 2011 and have displayed collaborative behaviours continuously but was never rewarded and rarely recognised for it.  I carried on because it is in my nature but most are not like me! Bp has embarked on a digital transformation last year and has finally appointed someone to lead a culture transformation as well.  The right culture will not happen overnight however.
Stacie, an idea from me: For an organisation wanting to see knowledge sharing become natural for everyone, its leaders need to realise the need for a collaborative culture and consider this as a strategic objective.  It then needs to appoint a senior leader to lead the cultural transformation. 
 


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Thanks Stan for bringing these back up!

Sent from Stacie's iPhone


Stacie Jordan Brenkovich
 

Thanks Patrick!  Your last sentence hits the nail
On the head! “For an organisation wanting to see knowledge sharing become natural for everyone, its leaders need to realise the need for a collaborative culture and consider this as a strategic objective.  It then needs to appoint a senior leader to lead the cultural transformation”. 

This is where we are focusing, building leader advocacy.  We have so many great bones in place but now need to really activate our leaders to drive a more scalable knowledge sharing culture. And as you know you find pockets of leaders who get it and embrace it so I do think it’s a matter of getting the message out to as many leaders  as possible and working with those who embrace.  

I would love to connect with your colleague at BP leading the culture transformation if possible. 

Thanks 
Stacie

Sent from Stacie's iPhone


Peter-Anthony Glick
 

Stacie I'm Peter not Patrick :)

Leader advocacy is crucial indeed but what I mean by leaders are at board level starting with the CEO! That's where a strategic intent will come from.
In bp, Bernard Looney has understood the importance of collaboration for example.  One of his first action at the start of last year when he took his new role was to remove the historical "segment" silos by completely reshaping the organisation's structure (the two key segments were Downstream (marketing & refining) and Upstream (extraction and production) ).
Bp is not out of the knowledge silos woods yet however, as there is a risk of creating new silos within the new internal businesses.  However, for Bernard and his leadership team, that's where the new culture comes in to prevent this from happening. 
But again Stacie, I recommend speaking to leaders about collaboration culture instead of knowledge sharing, the latter being a feature of the former, not the other way around.
  


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Peter,

Very well said, but I think we need to be careful not to make the prescription of things like "collaborative culture" a dogma. For example per Snowden and Cynefin, a focus on collaborative culture would be incorrect in a crisis environment.

The last time KM sparked broad interest in the 1990s, it failed to catch on in large part because the consultant-led model promoted certain behaviours regardless of the nature of the organisation being targeted.

The uncritical application of the same KM "solutions" in a wide range of contexts often led to mediocre outcomes that would limp along for a few years and then be quietly axed due to no-one being able to point to concrete benefits.

For KM to regain its standing as a critically-accepted discipline, we have to be rigorous about this. Any calls to adopt a KM initiative needs to have an explicit theory of change backing it and most importantly, indications and contraindications for its use. Otherwise we're just going to repeat the same mistakes of the past.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 6/03/2021 6:41 am, Peter-Anthony Glick via groups.io wrote:

Thank you Stan for alerting me of this discussion on my favourite topic, and for reconnecting me with the SIKM group! Last time I engaged with all of you could be 10yrs ago!
Firstly, you will find here my latest article which prompted Stan to inform me of this thread: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-important-culture-digital-transformation-peter-anthony-glick/

Stacie, I read the responses you got so far and agree with most of them.  Nirmala and Patrick are right in highlighting the importance of culture.   In fact, to me this is the key to success for knowledge sharing to truly permeates an entire organisation and for the relevant behaviours to stick for the long term.
As Stephen alludes to, it should not be about knowledge sharing for knowledge sharing sake.  People will naturally share their knowledge if the working environment makes it the "right" thing to do.  And I not only mean right for the organisation, but right for the individuals first! 
Since my early years engaging with this group, I have evolved my thinking on this and realise that focusing on knowledge processes was missing the big picture.  What we (KMers) should focus on instead is on how to establish a collaborative culture.  With such a culture, knowledge sharing becomes the way to do business.   As Matt writes, collaborating becomes an integral part of your job.
In a truly collaborative culture, all the levers you have already mentioned in this thread (Abbe gives a good list) will be common place.  I would point out that Rewards & Recognition for collaborative behaviours should be part of the normal performance assessment.  I don't believe at all in separate gamification systems such as the one you mention Abbe.  A collaborative culture starts at the recruitment stage with job descriptions stipulating the desired behaviours and mindset.  Then, everyone is expected to embrace the collaborative mindset to be successful, including pay rises and promotions.  
I have been with bp since 2011 and have displayed collaborative behaviours continuously but was never rewarded and rarely recognised for it.  I carried on because it is in my nature but most are not like me! Bp has embarked on a digital transformation last year and has finally appointed someone to lead a culture transformation as well.  The right culture will not happen overnight however.
Stacie, an idea from me: For an organisation wanting to see knowledge sharing become natural for everyone, its leaders need to realise the need for a collaborative culture and consider this as a strategic objective.  It then needs to appoint a senior leader to lead the cultural transformation. 
 


Eli Miron
 

Dear Stephen,

 

  1.   I suggest to read "Building a knowledge-driven organization" by Robert Buckman.  He, the CEO, initiated the change (the attached is from his talk in Singapore, 2007)

 

 

  1. I think that collaborative culture is helpful in crises, as shown in COVID-19 crisis.

    Best,

    Eli

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Sunday, March 7, 2021 1:51 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing culture #culture

 

Hi Peter,

Very well said, but I think we need to be careful not to make the prescription of things like "collaborative culture" a dogma. For example per Snowden and Cynefin, a focus on collaborative culture would be incorrect in a crisis environment.

The last time KM sparked broad interest in the 1990s, it failed to catch on in large part because the consultant-led model promoted certain behaviours regardless of the nature of the organisation being targeted.

The uncritical application of the same KM "solutions" in a wide range of contexts often led to mediocre outcomes that would limp along for a few years and then be quietly axed due to no-one being able to point to concrete benefits.

For KM to regain its standing as a critically-accepted discipline, we have to be rigorous about this. Any calls to adopt a KM initiative needs to have an explicit theory of change backing it and most importantly, indications and contraindications for its use. Otherwise we're just going to repeat the same mistakes of the past.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 6/03/2021 6:41 am, Peter-Anthony Glick via groups.io wrote:

Thank you Stan for alerting me of this discussion on my favourite topic, and for reconnecting me with the SIKM group! Last time I engaged with all of you could be 10yrs ago!
Firstly, you will find here my latest article which prompted Stan to inform me of this thread: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-important-culture-digital-transformation-peter-anthony-glick/

Stacie, I read the responses you got so far and agree with most of them.  Nirmala and Patrick are right in highlighting the importance of culture.   In fact, to me this is the key to success for knowledge sharing to truly permeates an entire organisation and for the relevant behaviours to stick for the long term.
As Stephen alludes to, it should not be about knowledge sharing for knowledge sharing sake.  People will naturally share their knowledge if the working environment makes it the "right" thing to do.  And I not only mean right for the organisation, but right for the individuals first! 
Since my early years engaging with this group, I have evolved my thinking on this and realise that focusing on knowledge processes was missing the big picture.  What we (KMers) should focus on instead is on how to establish a collaborative culture.  With such a culture, knowledge sharing becomes the way to do business.   As Matt writes, collaborating becomes an integral part of your job.
In a truly collaborative culture, all the levers you have already mentioned in this thread (Abbe gives a good list) will be common place.  I would point out that Rewards & Recognition for collaborative behaviours should be part of the normal performance assessment.  I don't believe at all in separate gamification systems such as the one you mention Abbe.  A collaborative culture starts at the recruitment stage with job descriptions stipulating the desired behaviours and mindset.  Then, everyone is expected to embrace the collaborative mindset to be successful, including pay rises and promotions.  
I have been with bp since 2011 and have displayed collaborative behaviours continuously but was never rewarded and rarely recognised for it.  I carried on because it is in my nature but most are not like me! Bp has embarked on a digital transformation last year and has finally appointed someone to lead a culture transformation as well.  The right culture will not happen overnight however.
Stacie, an idea from me: For an organisation wanting to see knowledge sharing become natural for everyone, its leaders need to realise the need for a collaborative culture and consider this as a strategic objective.  It then needs to appoint a senior leader to lead the cultural transformation. 
 


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Eli,

I'm very aware of Buckman. In fact, he is my poster child for someone who applied a useful initiative to his own organisation, which was picked up as an exemplar and badly applied in other organisational contexts.

I would also argue that COVID-19 is a problem which has been operating at two speeds. The immediate crisis response (eg border closures, lockdowns) has been exemplified by centralised control and minimal consultation. But longer-term activities that don't really fit the "crisis" mode (eg scientific research and vaccine development) have, of course, been far more collaborative.

To be clear, the point is precisely that a one-size-fit-all approach is not appropriate. Even within a crisis, there will be pockets of stable response. And even in the most robust and predictable of organisations, there will be pockets of dynamism and collaboration. The trick is to identify what is what.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 7/03/2021 5:07 pm, Eli Miron wrote:

Dear Stephen,

 

  1.   I suggest to read "Building a knowledge-driven organization" by Robert Buckman.  He, the CEO, initiated the change (the attached is from his talk in Singapore, 2007)

 

 

  1. I think that collaborative culture is helpful in crises, as shown in COVID-19 crisis.

    Best,

    Eli

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds
Sent: Sunday, March 7, 2021 1:51 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing culture #culture

 

Hi Peter,

Very well said, but I think we need to be careful not to make the prescription of things like "collaborative culture" a dogma. For example per Snowden and Cynefin, a focus on collaborative culture would be incorrect in a crisis environment.

The last time KM sparked broad interest in the 1990s, it failed to catch on in large part because the consultant-led model promoted certain behaviours regardless of the nature of the organisation being targeted.

The uncritical application of the same KM "solutions" in a wide range of contexts often led to mediocre outcomes that would limp along for a few years and then be quietly axed due to no-one being able to point to concrete benefits.

For KM to regain its standing as a critically-accepted discipline, we have to be rigorous about this. Any calls to adopt a KM initiative needs to have an explicit theory of change backing it and most importantly, indications and contraindications for its use. Otherwise we're just going to repeat the same mistakes of the past.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 6/03/2021 6:41 am, Peter-Anthony Glick via groups.io wrote:

Thank you Stan for alerting me of this discussion on my favourite topic, and for reconnecting me with the SIKM group! Last time I engaged with all of you could be 10yrs ago!
Firstly, you will find here my latest article which prompted Stan to inform me of this thread: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-important-culture-digital-transformation-peter-anthony-glick/

Stacie, I read the responses you got so far and agree with most of them.  Nirmala and Patrick are right in highlighting the importance of culture.   In fact, to me this is the key to success for knowledge sharing to truly permeates an entire organisation and for the relevant behaviours to stick for the long term.
As Stephen alludes to, it should not be about knowledge sharing for knowledge sharing sake.  People will naturally share their knowledge if the working environment makes it the "right" thing to do.  And I not only mean right for the organisation, but right for the individuals first! 
Since my early years engaging with this group, I have evolved my thinking on this and realise that focusing on knowledge processes was missing the big picture.  What we (KMers) should focus on instead is on how to establish a collaborative culture.  With such a culture, knowledge sharing becomes the way to do business.   As Matt writes, collaborating becomes an integral part of your job.
In a truly collaborative culture, all the levers you have already mentioned in this thread (Abbe gives a good list) will be common place.  I would point out that Rewards & Recognition for collaborative behaviours should be part of the normal performance assessment.  I don't believe at all in separate gamification systems such as the one you mention Abbe.  A collaborative culture starts at the recruitment stage with job descriptions stipulating the desired behaviours and mindset.  Then, everyone is expected to embrace the collaborative mindset to be successful, including pay rises and promotions.  
I have been with bp since 2011 and have displayed collaborative behaviours continuously but was never rewarded and rarely recognised for it.  I carried on because it is in my nature but most are not like me! Bp has embarked on a digital transformation last year and has finally appointed someone to lead a culture transformation as well.  The right culture will not happen overnight however.
Stacie, an idea from me: For an organisation wanting to see knowledge sharing become natural for everyone, its leaders need to realise the need for a collaborative culture and consider this as a strategic objective.  It then needs to appoint a senior leader to lead the cultural transformation. 
 


Peter-Anthony Glick
 

Hi Stephen 
A collaborative culture has to be adapted to the organisation, absolutely.  I don't however understand why a collaborative culture would be incorrect in a crisis environment.  That does not make any sense to me at all.
When an organisation embraces a new culture it is for the long term and it will have to deal with whatever situations the organisation will have to deal with.
You dont just stop being collaborative because you are in a crisis.  In fact, I could easily argue that collaborative behaviours will be more effective in a crisis than command and control.  The latter assumes that the ones commanding know exactly what to do to deal with the crisis.  There are countless examples in public and private sectors of leaders failing to in times of crisis.  Look at all these large retail organisations going out of business!
Also, as I wrote in my Linkedin article: "

Collaboration does not mean consensus. If a collaborative culture implies collective responsibility, it first and foremost imposes individual accountability"