Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition #knowledge-sharing


 

Over the years I’ve found the military to be an interesting source of KM tools that can be readily applied to business operations. After Action Reviews (AAR), OODA Loops, and the Warfighting doctrine manual all come to mind. 

If I were still an active KM practitioner, I would probably immerse myself in this latest publication and see what I could glean from it and apply to whatever my latest KM challenge might have been. 

Army Program Seeks to Heighten Soldiers’ Cognition

By Steven Aftergood • April 12, 2021 

A properly trained soldier can distinguish a vegetarian from a meat-eater based on their smell, a new Army publication says, since “different diets produce different human odors.”

He or she can to determine the age, gender and even the mental state of a target by studying their footprints.

Not simply a warrior, the ideal soldier is also an intelligence analyst, a cultural anthropologist, and a student of human nature with the ability to confront and overcome adversity — Sherlock Holmes and Leatherstocking and a bit of Tarzan, all in one.

That, at any rate, seems to be the goal of the US Army’s Advanced Situational Awareness program, which trains soldiers to discern even subtle anomalies in the combat environment, to swiftly assess their implications, and to act decisively in response.

Fascinating. https://fas.org/blogs/secrecy/2021/04/army-asa/



--
-Tom
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Tom Short Consulting
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Murray Jennex
 

thanks Tom, this is great! its what I've been doing and teaching in fusing KM and cybersecurity and security and crisis response.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Thu, May 6, 2021 8:25 am
Subject: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Over the years I’ve found the military to be an interesting source of KM tools that can be readily applied to business operations. After Action Reviews (AAR), OODA Loops, and the Warfighting doctrine manual all come to mind. 
If I were still an active KM practitioner, I would probably immerse myself in this latest publication and see what I could glean from it and apply to whatever my latest KM challenge might have been. 

Army Program Seeks to Heighten Soldiers’ Cognition

By Steven Aftergood • April 12, 2021 
A properly trained soldier can distinguish a vegetarian from a meat-eater based on their smell, a new Army publication says, since “different diets produce different human odors.”
He or she can to determine the age, gender and even the mental state of a target by studying their footprints.
Not simply a warrior, the ideal soldier is also an intelligence analyst, a cultural anthropologist, and a student of human nature with the ability to confront and overcome adversity — Sherlock Holmes and Leatherstocking and a bit of Tarzan, all in one.
That, at any rate, seems to be the goal of the US Army’s Advanced Situational Awareness program, which trains soldiers to discern even subtle anomalies in the combat environment, to swiftly assess their implications, and to act decisively in response.
Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


 

Great, Murray. Sounds like you’re doing some interesting work. (Are you working with your clients on heightening olfactory awareness?? :-)
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
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+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Matt Moore
 

Tom,

The military are often interesting sources of technology and ideas.

Altho perhaps a key lesson for other organisations is that simply having massive amounts of money and technology is not enough for success.


BTW In 2008, a KM practitioner in Australia (not myself) was discussing After Action Reviews in a corporate setting. He mentioned they were developed by the US Army - and that reduced their credibility in the eyes of his audience.

This also may be of interest: https://infoinnouts.podbean.com/e/war/

Regards,

Matt Moore
+61 423 784 504

On May 7, 2021, at 1:25 AM, Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...> wrote:



Over the years I’ve found the military to be an interesting source of KM tools that can be readily applied to business operations. After Action Reviews (AAR), OODA Loops, and the Warfighting doctrine manual all come to mind. 

If I were still an active KM practitioner, I would probably immerse myself in this latest publication and see what I could glean from it and apply to whatever my latest KM challenge might have been. 

Army Program Seeks to Heighten Soldiers’ Cognition

By Steven Aftergood • April 12, 2021 

A properly trained soldier can distinguish a vegetarian from a meat-eater based on their smell, a new Army publication says, since “different diets produce different human odors.”

He or she can to determine the age, gender and even the mental state of a target by studying their footprints.

Not simply a warrior, the ideal soldier is also an intelligence analyst, a cultural anthropologist, and a student of human nature with the ability to confront and overcome adversity — Sherlock Holmes and Leatherstocking and a bit of Tarzan, all in one.

That, at any rate, seems to be the goal of the US Army’s Advanced Situational Awareness program, which trains soldiers to discern even subtle anomalies in the combat environment, to swiftly assess their implications, and to act decisively in response.

Fascinating. https://fas.org/blogs/secrecy/2021/04/army-asa/



--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


 

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Murray Jennex
 

Well said Tom, I agree that the impact of dying is a big motivator.  As a former US Navy nuclear propulsion officer it was drilled into our heads to learn from mistakes and to never make the same mistake twice (even if it wasn't you who made it first) as people died from mistakes.  The civilian world isn't used to that kind of pressure unless you are an airline pilot, other transportation operator, nuclear or utility person, astronaut.  Surprisingly the one civilian profession you would really expect to learn from AAL/AAR is the medical profession and it is actually quite poor learning from mistakes.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 9:30 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--
Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Murray,

I'm curious about the basis of your negative views about the medical profession. To the contrary, I feel that the medical profession is constantly learning from its mistakes but it is simply not possible to aspire to a "zero fatality" rate in a medical setting. You routinely have to assess the odds and roll the dice on survival for any given case when time and knowledge are limited.

This is quite different from the military where zero fatalities should be entirely achievable outside of a hostile engagement.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 18/05/2021 4:16 pm, Murray Jennex via groups.io wrote:

Well said Tom, I agree that the impact of dying is a big motivator.  As a former US Navy nuclear propulsion officer it was drilled into our heads to learn from mistakes and to never make the same mistake twice (even if it wasn't you who made it first) as people died from mistakes.  The civilian world isn't used to that kind of pressure unless you are an airline pilot, other transportation operator, nuclear or utility person, astronaut.  Surprisingly the one civilian profession you would really expect to learn from AAL/AAR is the medical profession and it is actually quite poor learning from mistakes.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 9:30 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--
Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Murray Jennex
 

the basis of my opinion is quite simple, the book, The Checklist Manifesto, was published in 2009 and is about getting the medical profession to actually use decision tools such as checklists to make minimize mistakes.  Checklists have been used in the military, utilities, transportation, since the 1960s.  Checklists are explicit knowledge codified into simple to use lists to help prevent errors.  That the medical profession is 50 years behind the critical industries that use them tells me that the medical profession is pretty poor at using knowledge to prevent recurrence of mistakes.  The book makes the point about how bad the medical profession is on using knowledge to prevent mistakes also.  That having patients mark the areas being operated on only started as a common practice about the time the book came out.  Amazing to me as simple practices like this had been used in nuclear for 50 years prior.....murray


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Bounds <km@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 11:43 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Hi Murray,
I'm curious about the basis of your negative views about the medical profession. To the contrary, I feel that the medical profession is constantly learning from its mistakes but it is simply not possible to aspire to a "zero fatality" rate in a medical setting. You routinely have to assess the odds and roll the dice on survival for any given case when time and knowledge are limited.
This is quite different from the military where zero fatalities should be entirely achievable outside of a hostile engagement.
Cheers,
Stephen.
====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 18/05/2021 4:16 pm, Murray Jennex via groups.io wrote:
Well said Tom, I agree that the impact of dying is a big motivator.  As a former US Navy nuclear propulsion officer it was drilled into our heads to learn from mistakes and to never make the same mistake twice (even if it wasn't you who made it first) as people died from mistakes.  The civilian world isn't used to that kind of pressure unless you are an airline pilot, other transportation operator, nuclear or utility person, astronaut.  Surprisingly the one civilian profession you would really expect to learn from AAL/AAR is the medical profession and it is actually quite poor learning from mistakes.....murray jennex


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 9:30 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--
Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Robert L. Bogue
 

Adding to this…

 

The Checklist Manifesto is a good book.  The medical profession suffers from an experience bias – people think in terms of their experience.  It’s the same problem VFR (Visual Flight Rules) pilots have when flying in IMC (Instrument Meteorological Conditions.)  Instead of trusting the instruments they trust their instincts.  The other problem with learning in the medical profession is that “right” and “mistake” are hard to define.  In some places we can say someone did something wrong – but not in most of the cases.

 

The gap between state of the art and state of the industry gets wider when the rate of change increases.  We’re at a very high rate of change now.

 

Rob

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Murray Jennex via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, May 18, 2021 4:17 AM
To: km@...; main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

 

the basis of my opinion is quite simple, the book, The Checklist Manifesto, was published in 2009 and is about getting the medical profession to actually use decision tools such as checklists to make minimize mistakes.  Checklists have been used in the military, utilities, transportation, since the 1960s.  Checklists are explicit knowledge codified into simple to use lists to help prevent errors.  That the medical profession is 50 years behind the critical industries that use them tells me that the medical profession is pretty poor at using knowledge to prevent recurrence of mistakes.  The book makes the point about how bad the medical profession is on using knowledge to prevent mistakes also.  That having patients mark the areas being operated on only started as a common practice about the time the book came out.  Amazing to me as simple practices like this had been used in nuclear for 50 years prior.....murray

-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Bounds <km@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 11:43 pm
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Hi Murray,

I'm curious about the basis of your negative views about the medical profession. To the contrary, I feel that the medical profession is constantly learning from its mistakes but it is simply not possible to aspire to a "zero fatality" rate in a medical setting. You routinely have to assess the odds and roll the dice on survival for any given case when time and knowledge are limited.

This is quite different from the military where zero fatalities should be entirely achievable outside of a hostile engagement.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 18/05/2021 4:16 pm, Murray Jennex via groups.io wrote:

Well said Tom, I agree that the impact of dying is a big motivator.  As a former US Navy nuclear propulsion officer it was drilled into our heads to learn from mistakes and to never make the same mistake twice (even if it wasn't you who made it first) as people died from mistakes.  The civilian world isn't used to that kind of pressure unless you are an airline pilot, other transportation operator, nuclear or utility person, astronaut.  Surprisingly the one civilian profession you would really expect to learn from AAL/AAR is the medical profession and it is actually quite poor learning from mistakes.....murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 9:30 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


 

Years ago we did some work a while back with Children’s Hospital in Wash DC.  The area we were supporting was the shift change  between hospital staff and how the teams transferred knowledge between shifts for the patients.  We also studied the number of mistakes among interns, residents, and embedded staff and how the learnings could be shared to reduce errors.  Checklists were at the top of the list though they were not being used effectively.

 

Bill

 

 

  

 

Learn more about the solutions and value we provide at www.workingknowledge-csp.com

 

 

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds via groups.io
Sent: Monday, May 17, 2021 23:43
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

 

Hi Murray,

I'm curious about the basis of your negative views about the medical profession. To the contrary, I feel that the medical profession is constantly learning from its mistakes but it is simply not possible to aspire to a "zero fatality" rate in a medical setting. You routinely have to assess the odds and roll the dice on survival for any given case when time and knowledge are limited.

This is quite different from the military where zero fatalities should be entirely achievable outside of a hostile engagement.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 18/05/2021 4:16 pm, Murray Jennex via groups.io wrote:

Well said Tom, I agree that the impact of dying is a big motivator.  As a former US Navy nuclear propulsion officer it was drilled into our heads to learn from mistakes and to never make the same mistake twice (even if it wasn't you who made it first) as people died from mistakes.  The civilian world isn't used to that kind of pressure unless you are an airline pilot, other transportation operator, nuclear or utility person, astronaut.  Surprisingly the one civilian profession you would really expect to learn from AAL/AAR is the medical profession and it is actually quite poor learning from mistakes.....murray jennex

-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Short <tshortconsulting@...>
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Sent: Mon, May 17, 2021 9:30 am
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Knowledge sharing in the US Army: program seeks to heighten soldier cognition

Oh, I dunno, Matt. From time to time discussions about AAL/AAR came up in a corporate setting and someone would ask about them, and why, if it was so effective in the military, there were so few examples of successful implementations in the private sector. My response: Because in general, no one dies in the corporate world, so failure to learn is an inconvenience to some - and a political benefit to others. 
--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


 

I recall working at IBM on creating new KM offerings for the Life Sciences vertical and citing the then widely acknowledged statistic of 1 in 7 hospital deaths were due to error. Recent research appears to have debunked that notion. https://news.yale.edu/2020/01/28/estimates-preventable-hospital-deaths-are-too-high-new-study-shows

Perhaps more interesting from a KM perspective is the notion of how systemic noise could be a more important focus for improving healthcare outcomes. In this NYT OpEd co-authored by Daniel Kahneman (one of my heroes), they highlight studies in the legal and medical fields that show that when professionals in these fields are presented with the same fact pattern they reach different conclusions. Even when bias is screened out, there are still differences. 

The takeaway? Before getting any kind of medical procedure done, always get a second (or third) opinion. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/15/opinion/noise-bias-kahneman.html


--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts