Lessons Learned - Building skills to recognize and describe them #lessons-learned


Eve Porter-Zuckerman
 

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Eve,

Ordinarily I hate the "C" word (culture) because it is so often misused, but I think it has relevance here.

There is a natural tension between hoarding knowledge for individual success, and sharing knowledge to maximise success of the group. Overcoming this requires a group acceptance that individual and joint success are linked. In addition, the specific acts of knowledge sharing have to be actually evaluated by individuals and groups as successful.

What you are seeking is a positive reinforcement cycle that draws a direct link between knowledge sharing and valuable outcomes.

I know this all sounds self-evident but you would be amazed how many times people aim to establish knowledge sharing and then say "job done". The problem is when you stop your thinking here, you're creating a cycle that is only sustained through continuous injections of incentives. What you are seeking is a system of activities that people intrinsically find valuable.

Back to culture! Culture is about how people discuss and adapt their approach to:

  • principles - consensus on value (how)
  • objectives - consensus on outcomes (why)
  • norms - consensus on behaviours (what)

Importantly, not discussing how these consensus positions are reached is is itself a form of organisational culture. One important step you can take is to start explicitly evaluating these often unstated assumptions:

  • Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How? Could it be improved? When does it come in handy? Why? Do others feel the same way? Do people ever share too often or too much? Are there people who tend not to share? Do you know why they don't share? If they should share more, how could this be supported?
  • When is the right time to share? Are there wrong times to share? Is it good to record things even if no immediate reuse is apparent? Are there kind of things to capture which are more likely to be reusable than others?
  • When have lessons learned and knowledge sharing been useful to you? What changed about your situation? Why? What would have happened if you didn't hear it from them? Did they benefit from sharing? Were you grateful? Should sharing be a thing we also "just do" intrinsically as a member of the organisation, or are extrinsic (tangible) rewards appropriate? Would people who intrinsically like to share resent extrinsic rewards being given to others, even if that was the only thing that would trigger them to share?
  • What are the individual benefits of sharing? Does everyone agree? Would it be a net positive or negative to your work if you were expected to share? Would you consider leaving if your performance was evaluated on how much you shared? Would other people you know of join or leave an organisation where sharing was a basic expectation of being an employee?
  • Would people feel more enthusiastic about sharing if it could be shown that an important metric improved? Are there key challenges your organisation is currently facing? Is there a measurable metric that represents this challenge?
  • What behaviours are expected of people who work for your organisation? What behaviours are actively disapproved of or discouraged? Are these expectations implicit or explicit? If implicit, do people feel these behavioural expectation should be stated explicitly? Do you have cultural leaders (not necessarily the formal leaders) who are influential in behaviours?
  • Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organisation? Could your organisation be heavily impacted by external factors beyond your control (eg funding cuts) and would your organisation handle major impacts well or with difficulty?
  • Do you work outside of their normal professional responsibilities as needed to support overall outcomes? Or is "your job", your job? What happens when people either offer or are asked to go outside their ordinary responsibilities?
  • Could you ever see a situation where sharing knowledge might disadvantage you personally? Why / why not?
  • Have you ever started or stopped a behaviour because of an individual consequence you faced, or may have faced? Have you ever stopped a behaviour, even if it was encouraged, because it either had an organisational outcome you disapproved of, or failed to have a measurable impact? Why?
  • Are people rewarded for taking risks, and/or punished for failure? Does it matter who was at fault when things go wrong? How do you personally feel about taking risks in your work?
  • Do you think everyone has the skills to share effectively? Why / why not? How does this change your expectations around lessons learned and knowledge sharing? Would you be comfortable making knowledge sharing a highly encouraged norm, even if led to people who preferred not to share to leave? Why / why not?

Understanding the answers to these questions will help you to craft more effective knowledge-building practices, both tactically and strategically.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 14/04/2022 6:01 am, Eve Porter-Zuckerman wrote:

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


Endro Catur
 

Stephen,

These are a list of reflective questions that would be useful in collective settings such as teams and organizations. I have used some questions that were similar to those in this list when discussing post-knowledge mapping, especially when the mapping purpose is unfortunately limited to knowledge sharing.

My understanding is, that to create value, knowledge sharing is a SUPPLY that needs someone and some process to DEMAND it. Having this economical mindset, it may be limiting in itself but, helps people to share and seek what matters, esp. in the business context.
 
--- Salam. Regards. ---



Founder, Sekolah Fasilitasi | Co-Founder at Facilitator.Network | Certified Professional Facilitator (CPF) | Certified Professional Human Resource (CHRP)


www.endrocn.com | www.sekolahfasilitasi.com | www.facilitator.network | +628558884441 | http://bit.ly/EndroCatur-CV


This e-mail and its attachment, if any, is intended for the addressee. The content is private and confidential and may contain copyright and/or legally privileged information. If you receive this email in error, please notify me immediately and delete this email together with any attachment. Any unauthorised use, dissemination, or copying of this message, or any attachment, is strictly prohibited.



On Mon, Apr 18, 2022 at 11:38 AM Stephen Bounds <km@...> wrote:

Hi Eve,

Ordinarily I hate the "C" word (culture) because it is so often misused, but I think it has relevance here.

There is a natural tension between hoarding knowledge for individual success, and sharing knowledge to maximise success of the group. Overcoming this requires a group acceptance that individual and joint success are linked. In addition, the specific acts of knowledge sharing have to be actually evaluated by individuals and groups as successful.

What you are seeking is a positive reinforcement cycle that draws a direct link between knowledge sharing and valuable outcomes.

I know this all sounds self-evident but you would be amazed how many times people aim to establish knowledge sharing and then say "job done". The problem is when you stop your thinking here, you're creating a cycle that is only sustained through continuous injections of incentives. What you are seeking is a system of activities that people intrinsically find valuable.

Back to culture! Culture is about how people discuss and adapt their approach to:

  • principles - consensus on value (how)
  • objectives - consensus on outcomes (why)
  • norms - consensus on behaviours (what)

Importantly, not discussing how these consensus positions are reached is is itself a form of organisational culture. One important step you can take is to start explicitly evaluating these often unstated assumptions:

  • Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How? Could it be improved? When does it come in handy? Why? Do others feel the same way? Do people ever share too often or too much? Are there people who tend not to share? Do you know why they don't share? If they should share more, how could this be supported?
  • When is the right time to share? Are there wrong times to share? Is it good to record things even if no immediate reuse is apparent? Are there kind of things to capture which are more likely to be reusable than others?
  • When have lessons learned and knowledge sharing been useful to you? What changed about your situation? Why? What would have happened if you didn't hear it from them? Did they benefit from sharing? Were you grateful? Should sharing be a thing we also "just do" intrinsically as a member of the organisation, or are extrinsic (tangible) rewards appropriate? Would people who intrinsically like to share resent extrinsic rewards being given to others, even if that was the only thing that would trigger them to share?
  • What are the individual benefits of sharing? Does everyone agree? Would it be a net positive or negative to your work if you were expected to share? Would you consider leaving if your performance was evaluated on how much you shared? Would other people you know of join or leave an organisation where sharing was a basic expectation of being an employee?
  • Would people feel more enthusiastic about sharing if it could be shown that an important metric improved? Are there key challenges your organisation is currently facing? Is there a measurable metric that represents this challenge?
  • What behaviours are expected of people who work for your organisation? What behaviours are actively disapproved of or discouraged? Are these expectations implicit or explicit? If implicit, do people feel these behavioural expectation should be stated explicitly? Do you have cultural leaders (not necessarily the formal leaders) who are influential in behaviours?
  • Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organisation? Could your organisation be heavily impacted by external factors beyond your control (eg funding cuts) and would your organisation handle major impacts well or with difficulty?
  • Do you work outside of their normal professional responsibilities as needed to support overall outcomes? Or is "your job", your job? What happens when people either offer or are asked to go outside their ordinary responsibilities?
  • Could you ever see a situation where sharing knowledge might disadvantage you personally? Why / why not?
  • Have you ever started or stopped a behaviour because of an individual consequence you faced, or may have faced? Have you ever stopped a behaviour, even if it was encouraged, because it either had an organisational outcome you disapproved of, or failed to have a measurable impact? Why?
  • Are people rewarded for taking risks, and/or punished for failure? Does it matter who was at fault when things go wrong? How do you personally feel about taking risks in your work?
  • Do you think everyone has the skills to share effectively? Why / why not? How does this change your expectations around lessons learned and knowledge sharing? Would you be comfortable making knowledge sharing a highly encouraged norm, even if led to people who preferred not to share to leave? Why / why not?

Understanding the answers to these questions will help you to craft more effective knowledge-building practices, both tactically and strategically.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 14/04/2022 6:01 am, Eve Porter-Zuckerman wrote:

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...


 

Hello Eve - 

You wrote: 
I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.
You also mention that you've already searched the forum for previous threads on this. Hopefully you've come across posts that reference the US Army's AAR process and CALL. If not, I'd recommend you find info on those, as they lay out an important part of the answer to your question. 

After that, there are two ways to think about lessons learned: one is in the context of a work process, whereby a worker identifies a better way to perform a task/step/operation that is already otherwise encoded and practiced. The better way improves the process via less time to complete, less labor to complete, improved quality in the output and/or increased revenue. Let's call this process innovation. It centers on "know how". 

The other type of lesson learned centers on "know what." The US military had a hard time with IEDs (roadside bombs), because the enemy was constantly changing how they deployed them, and there was latency in the existing approaches the Army had for describing these and disseminating it back out to field so that others could learn about new IED types. As a result, people were dying or getting hurt because of the latency. They eventually improved their lessons learned process so that the time was reduced between one unit discovering a new type of IED and other units being made aware of it and how to detect and defuse it, thereby saving lives. 

This required improving (or innovating, if you like) on the meta process of identifying and disseminating lessons learned, where the 'lessons' consisted mainly of 'know what', rather than 'know how.' 

In the world of commerce and other types of orgs, no one dies if processes remain inefficient or ineffective; or new knowledge is not rapidly codified, disseminated and reused. Therefore, the impetus to implement and maintain the discipline around lessons learned processes is lacking. 

This is where aligning incentives with behaviors and business outcomes comes into play. So I'd suggest you work backwards from the end goal you want (desired future state), and the impact of not achieving it (current state). Identify the cost in dollars and cents of not having any ability to routinely identify and implement lessons learned. Figure out what it would be worth to have a robust and consistent system in place for doing this. 

Then identify incentives for employees who are on the front line and exposed to the places where lessons learned come up, and failure to leverage them incurs cost. 

Then develop a campaign for raising awareness of the importance of lessons learned, the places where they come up that you want people to address, the business benefits of addressing them, and the WIIFM of doing it for the employees. 





--
-Tom
--

Tom Short Consulting
TSC
+1 415 300 7457

All of my previous SIKM Posts


Nancy Dixon
 

A great set of questions!
Nancy
           Nancy M Dixon
Web:www.commonknowledge.org 
Blog: www.nancydixonblog.com
Pres. of the US Academy of Professional Dialogue  


     
I use the practice of DIALOGUE to help groups work more effectively together

On Apr 18, 2022, at 2:07 AM, Endro Catur via groups.io <endro.catur@...> wrote:

Stephen,

These are a list of reflective questions that would be useful in collective settings such as teams and organizations. I have used some questions that were similar to those in this list when discussing post-knowledge mapping, especially when the mapping purpose is unfortunately limited to knowledge sharing.

My understanding is, that to create value, knowledge sharing is a SUPPLY that needs someone and some process to DEMAND it. Having this economical mindset, it may be limiting in itself but, helps people to share and seek what matters, esp. in the business context.
 
--- Salam. Regards. ---



Founder, Sekolah Fasilitasi | Co-Founder at Facilitator.Network | Certified Professional Facilitator (CPF) | Certified Professional Human Resource (CHRP)


This e-mail and its attachment, if any, is intended for the addressee. The content is private and confidential and may contain copyright and/or legally privileged information. If you receive this email in error, please notify me immediately and delete this email together with any attachment. Any unauthorised use, dissemination, or copying of this message, or any attachment, is strictly prohibited.


On Mon, Apr 18, 2022 at 11:38 AM Stephen Bounds <km@...> wrote:

Hi Eve,

Ordinarily I hate the "C" word (culture) because it is so often misused, but I think it has relevance here.

There is a natural tension between hoarding knowledge for individual success, and sharing knowledge to maximise success of the group. Overcoming this requires a group acceptance that individual and joint success are linked. In addition, the specific acts of knowledge sharing have to be actually evaluated by individuals and groups as successful.

What you are seeking is a positive reinforcement cycle that draws a direct link between knowledge sharing and valuable outcomes.

I know this all sounds self-evident but you would be amazed how many times people aim to establish knowledge sharing and then say "job done". The problem is when you stop your thinking here, you're creating a cycle that is only sustained through continuous injections of incentives. What you are seeking is a system of activities that people intrinsically find valuable.

Back to culture! Culture is about how people discuss and adapt their approach to:

  • principles - consensus on value (how)
  • objectives - consensus on outcomes (why)
  • norms - consensus on behaviours (what)

Importantly, not discussing how these consensus positions are reached is is itself a form of organisational culture. One important step you can take is to start explicitly evaluating these often unstated assumptions:

  • Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How? Could it be improved? When does it come in handy? Why? Do others feel the same way? Do people ever share too often or too much? Are there people who tend not to share? Do you know why they don't share? If they should share more, how could this be supported?
  • When is the right time to share? Are there wrong times to share? Is it good to record things even if no immediate reuse is apparent? Are there kind of things to capture which are more likely to be reusable than others?
  • When have lessons learned and knowledge sharing been useful to you? What changed about your situation? Why? What would have happened if you didn't hear it from them? Did they benefit from sharing? Were you grateful? Should sharing be a thing we also "just do" intrinsically as a member of the organisation, or are extrinsic (tangible) rewards appropriate? Would people who intrinsically like to share resent extrinsic rewards being given to others, even if that was the only thing that would trigger them to share?
  • What are the individual benefits of sharing? Does everyone agree? Would it be a net positive or negative to your work if you were expected to share? Would you consider leaving if your performance was evaluated on how much you shared? Would other people you know of join or leave an organisation where sharing was a basic expectation of being an employee?
  • Would people feel more enthusiastic about sharing if it could be shown that an important metric improved? Are there key challenges your organisation is currently facing? Is there a measurable metric that represents this challenge?
  • What behaviours are expected of people who work for your organisation? What behaviours are actively disapproved of or discouraged? Are these expectations implicit or explicit? If implicit, do people feel these behavioural expectation should be stated explicitly? Do you have cultural leaders (not necessarily the formal leaders) who are influential in behaviours?
  • Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organisation? Could your organisation be heavily impacted by external factors beyond your control (eg funding cuts) and would your organisation handle major impacts well or with difficulty?
  • Do you work outside of their normal professional responsibilities as needed to support overall outcomes? Or is "your job", your job? What happens when people either offer or are asked to go outside their ordinary responsibilities?
  • Could you ever see a situation where sharing knowledge might disadvantage you personally? Why / why not?
  • Have you ever started or stopped a behaviour because of an individual consequence you faced, or may have faced? Have you ever stopped a behaviour, even if it was encouraged, because it either had an organisational outcome you disapproved of, or failed to have a measurable impact? Why?
  • Are people rewarded for taking risks, and/or punished for failure? Does it matter who was at fault when things go wrong? How do you personally feel about taking risks in your work?
  • Do you think everyone has the skills to share effectively? Why / why not? How does this change your expectations around lessons learned and knowledge sharing? Would you be comfortable making knowledge sharing a highly encouraged norm, even if led to people who preferred not to share to leave? Why / why not?

Understanding the answers to these questions will help you to craft more effective knowledge-building practices, both tactically and strategically.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 14/04/2022 6:01 am, Eve Porter-Zuckerman wrote:

Hello everyone,

 

Inspired by TJ Hsu’s question about metadata and lessons learned, I’m looking for prompts, questions, pictures, and other guidance to help people recognize lessons learned and describe them in a way that others might benefit. 

 

I’m working with a growing organization that’s gradually, intentionally, distributing responsibility and moving to a learning culture as it transitions from founder-led. The appetite is there. The leadership is behind it and happy to model behavior and do what they can to encourage and celebrate. Members of the organization come from different cultures, educational backgrounds, and levels of professional experience. They are very hands-on. I’m helping them weave learning and sharing into their work, focusing on active learning and collaboration. 

 

I’d appreciate your thoughts on how to help people build skills to see and share lessons learned. We’re starting with (existing) meetings, and thinking about how to transition them from information exchanges to knowledge-building opportunities. Currently, at one of these meetings, someone sharing a great report might simply read out its title, and stop there. They won’t know how to highlight its value.

 

I have had a wonderful, productive time sifting through the trove of advice and thoughtful references here in the SIKM group, reading through and gathering excellent ideas from threads on #lessons-learned, #knowledge-sharing, #learning and other topics. I'm keeping my eye on the other thread with great interest and appreciation, too.

 

Thank you for what has been shared, and I look forward to your thoughts.

 

Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
eporterzuckerman@...





Eve Porter-Zuckerman
 

Thank you, Tom, for this.

 

The team I’m working with has really taken to developing their own version of an AAR. I like the “know what” vs. “know how” juxtaposition. It builds some helpful lesson recognition muscles.

 

We’re starting both large and small on the alignment with outcomes – practicing by applying these ideas, including working backwards from the end goal and considering the impact of not achieving it, to the first AAR-ish meeting. Building some understanding for what we’re dealing with at that scale is helping us with the much bigger task of cementing new habits of recognizing and sharing lessons learned across the organization, in line with their broader strategic goals.

 

Many thanks for your thoughts on this, and your prior AAR and other related notes to the full group in the past!

 

Eve


Eve Porter-Zuckerman
 

Stephen,

 

Thank you for your thoughtful response. I agree that culture is important – both organizational culture and the mix of cultures an organization might host. The themes, both in your definition of culture and the consensus on how, why, and what, and in your excellent set of questions, offer useful catalysts for stepping back to take on, deliberately, the fascinating act of discussing how the consensus positions might be reached.

 

I’m finding that it’s helpful to interweave, over time, the more theoretical questions, like “When is the right time to share?” with those that are more directed towards personal experience, like “Do you value when other people share their own experiences and knowledge? Why? How?...”, especially when they are illustrated with examples. We can then talk about the examples, explore other questions within that context, and build consensus that, hopefully, can then be applied more broadly.

 

And Endro Catur, thanks for your comment about supply and demand – some of the more effective cementing of a knowledge-sharing attitude has come with the steadfast insistence that without application/action, a lesson has not truly been learned. Building a knowledge-sharing culture must be coupled with building the expectations of a knowledge-demanding one.

 

In the May presentation by Rocio Sanz and John Hovell, they had some great quotes illustrating points of view in a slide on challenges and barriers to sharing knowledge (and building consensus) reminding me of your questions, like “I already know everything,” “I have nothing to learn from you,” and “Will I lose my job if I share?” These plus your trust questions: “Do you trust your leaders? Your peers? The overall functioning of your organization?...” add another dimension I’m finding so important to keep in mind – that agreeing in principle does not mean applying in reality.

 

Through repeated discussion of these ideas and questions (and having so many on hand, as you and others have offered, is wonderful), we’re surfacing the obstacles to sharing lying with individuals (for example, who might be stuck in the notion that they are the only ones who know anything useful and that others don’t know how to recognize or share). In surfacing these biases, we’re helping to expunge them – a wonderful learning process in itself – and building that consensus that will enable others to participate and share.

 

There is always much to discuss and explore in considering how to share and build knowledge, and I appreciate the time and attention you paid to considering my questions.

 

Cheers to you,

 

Eve


Dennis Pearce
 

Hi Eve,

Your comment about your team developing their own version of an AAR caught my attention so I thought I would chime in.  I did something similar at my former employer so I thought I would share the tweaks I made.  I worked with our product development teams (laser printer manufacturing) and had them insert AARs at the end of each phase of their development process (this was essentially a 5-phase process going from early design and prototyping in the lab, scaling up until we got to the first manufacturing run).  We did this on several products over a couple of years so I had lots of opportunities to think about the AAR process and iterate on it.

I wrote my experiences up in a couple of blog posts that might be of interest:

Dennis Pearce


Eve Porter-Zuckerman
 

Wonderful!
Thank you for sharing this. 
Eve

Eve Porter-Zuckerman
(617) 835-0323


On May 26, 2022, at 2:10 PM, Dennis Pearce <denpearce@...> wrote:

Hi Eve,

Your comment about your team developing their own version of an AAR caught my attention so I thought I would chime in.  I did something similar at my former employer so I thought I would share the tweaks I made.  I worked with our product development teams (laser printer manufacturing) and had them insert AARs at the end of each phase of their development process (this was essentially a 5-phase process going from early design and prototyping in the lab, scaling up until we got to the first manufacturing run).  We did this on several products over a couple of years so I had lots of opportunities to think about the AAR process and iterate on it.

I wrote my experiences up in a couple of blog posts that might be of interest:

Dennis Pearce