Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks? #CoP


Robert L. Bogue
 

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Monica Leftwich
 

Hi Robert. Simple:

Use hashtags.

Seriously. People will common interests are plastered all over social media. Join Facebook groups, follow Instagram and Tiktok hashtags yo see what these people are following and watching and listening to. From there, look for common themes, comments that get the most likes (or dislikes lol) and go from there.

It may take some good old fashion market (or even behavioral) research but it maybe a good starting point.

Good luck!

On Sun, Jun 19, 2022, 12:13 PM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Rob,

You could do worse than look at the various field naturalist organisations all over the globe. Many of these were founded in the 19th century and for 150 years or so, many have quietly but consistently assembled coalitions and communities of like-minded people who enjoy and want to preserve nature.

To be honest, I have no idea how they do it. But they are clearly doing something right!

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 20/06/2022 2:12 am, Robert L. Bogue wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Robert L. Bogue
 

Stephen –

 

Thanks.  When I was doing some work for Internet.com/Jupiter Media a decade ago I remember that they said that they didn’t build community sites, they bought them.  They have dozens.  (I managed a few for them.)  It struck me as odd.  Here’s an organization that had more communities in various technical tools and aspects – and yet they couldn’t (or didn’t invest the time) in figuring out the common characteristics that caused on community to form and others (that they didn’t buy) to languish.

 

For me, it’s probably a situation of creating the right conditions – that there’s no constructive formula – but I’ve not really seen a list of candidate conditions.

 

I’m also similarly curious about the fact that in marketing you’re told to find a narrow niche – but not too narrow.  It’s fascinating to me how people will come together around a narrow topic but not necessarily the broader – and how there are times when we need to combine or split communities.

 

It feels like there’s some interesting principles here, if we can just discover them.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2022 5:09 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io; SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Hi Rob,

You could do worse than look at the various field naturalist organisations all over the globe. Many of these were founded in the 19th century and for 150 years or so, many have quietly but consistently assembled coalitions and communities of like-minded people who enjoy and want to preserve nature.

To be honest, I have no idea how they do it. But they are clearly doing something right!

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 20/06/2022 2:12 am, Robert L. Bogue wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Stephen Bounds
 

Hi Rob,

My instinct is that there is likely to be a somewhat inverted implementation of Coase's theorem when it comes to community formation.

To conduct a qualitative study about the process, I reckon we could obtain some interesting insights by surveying the moderators of Reddit communities (noting that it will produce greater numbers of niche communities due to the lower friction in operations).

Happy to discuss further offline if this is something you would like to collaborate on.

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================
On 20/06/2022 9:26 pm, Robert L. Bogue wrote:

Stephen –

 

Thanks.  When I was doing some work for Internet.com/Jupiter Media a decade ago I remember that they said that they didn’t build community sites, they bought them.  They have dozens.  (I managed a few for them.)  It struck me as odd.  Here’s an organization that had more communities in various technical tools and aspects – and yet they couldn’t (or didn’t invest the time) in figuring out the common characteristics that caused on community to form and others (that they didn’t buy) to languish.

 

For me, it’s probably a situation of creating the right conditions – that there’s no constructive formula – but I’ve not really seen a list of candidate conditions.

 

I’m also similarly curious about the fact that in marketing you’re told to find a narrow niche – but not too narrow.  It’s fascinating to me how people will come together around a narrow topic but not necessarily the broader – and how there are times when we need to combine or split communities.

 

It feels like there’s some interesting principles here, if we can just discover them.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Stephen Bounds via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 20, 2022 5:09 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io; SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Hi Rob,

You could do worse than look at the various field naturalist organisations all over the globe. Many of these were founded in the 19th century and for 150 years or so, many have quietly but consistently assembled coalitions and communities of like-minded people who enjoy and want to preserve nature.

To be honest, I have no idea how they do it. But they are clearly doing something right!

Cheers,
Stephen.

====================================
Stephen Bounds
Executive, Information Management
Cordelta
E: stephen.bounds@...
M: 0401 829 096
====================================

On 20/06/2022 2:12 am, Robert L. Bogue wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Louis-Pierre Guillaume
 

Hello Robert

I would look at the startup that help create impactful communities that aims at changing the world

Examples from France

Best regards,
Louis-Pierre
_________________________________________________

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
Increase performance by improving the efficiency of teams through engagement and collective spirit
+33 6 10 33 63 21
louis-pierre.guillaume@...

www.amallte.comBook a meeting

LinkedIn - Twitter - Medium


On Sun, Jun 19, 2022 at 6:13 PM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Joitske Hulsebosch
 

Hi Robert, 

Interesting to read the different responses from hashtags to internal company communities. 

When I read your question
 "how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement)" I thought of  the work of Etienne Wenger and my experiences. 

What I advise and do is define the domain of the community very carefully - not too wide and not too narrow. For instance I have a dutch community around 'innovative learning with technologies' which has been going for 10 years. If it was 'learning with moodle' its focus would have been much smaller. Secondly it helps to have some thought leaders onboard. The thought leaders bring and attract their own crowd. There is a dutch book on communities which distinguised communities of practice (your first) and communities of purpose (your second). It would probably work differently in the second. 

@Stan Garfield what do you do?

cheers, Joitske Hulsebosch

On Tue, 21 Jun 2022 at 10:55, Louis-Pierre Guillaume <louis-pierre@...> wrote:
Dear SIKMers,

A friend of mine is working at Schneider Electric, a global multinational. The subsidiary in each country is led by a "Country President". The countries are grouped into zones that are each led, as you can imagine, by a "Zone President".

She is co-leading the community of "Country President" and "Zone President" (50+ members).
Not an easy role :-)

She would like to exchange practices with community leaders of similar communities in other companies.

Would you have contact to share ?
Thanks

Best regards,
Louis-Pierre
_________________________________________________

Louis-Pierre Guillaume

+33 6 10 33 63 21 louis-pierre.guillaume@...

www.amallte.comLinkedIn - Twitter - Medium



--
Joitske Hulsebosch, Ennuonline
06-44730093 

Tip: 

Ons nieuwe boek 'Blended leren ontwerpen' is uit. Je kunt het hier bestellen of de preview lezen op managementboek. 


Robert L. Bogue
 

I’m going to respond to a few of the messages I’ve seen together to minimize thread fragmentation.

 

First, thank you.

 

Second, the idea of hashtags is okay as a low gravity way to bring people together.  It might help bring people together who are already in the same circles.  However, I’ve never really seen people connect in this way.  The proliferation of tags means that it should hit the noise level and the reticular activating system (RAS) should start to suppress awareness of them.  Are any of you seeing something different?

 

Third, I love these community ideas.  Their presence indicates that it’s possible to build coalitions.  However, I’m still not sure on the “how.”  Of course, it’s possible to roll the dice repeatedly and eventually get a positive result – but I’m wondering if there are conditions that might make a positive result more likely.

 

It feels like there’s something to be found for enabling and disabling conditions – that we might be able to manipulate to get better results.

 

Am I dreaming again?

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Louis-Pierre Guillaume via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 4:38 AM
To: SIKM <main@sikm.groups.io>
Cc: SIKM@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Hello Robert

 

I would look at the startup that help create impactful communities that aims at changing the world

 

Examples from France

 

Best regards,

Louis-Pierre
_________________________________________________

Louis-Pierre Guillaume
Increase performance by improving the efficiency of teams through engagement and collective spirit
+33 6 10 33 63 21
louis-pierre.guillaume@...

www.amallte.comBook a meeting

LinkedIn - Twitter - Medium

 

On Sun, Jun 19, 2022 at 6:13 PM Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:

Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Stan Garfield
 

Joitske, I agree with your points. Here is what I have done to attract members interested in a specific topic.

From 10 Tips for Leading Communities 

  • Start with the broadest feasible topic and narrow down as needed.
  • Spin off narrower sub-topics only when a high volume of discussion or communication makes it necessary.
Publicize
  1. Look for all existing distribution lists of people interested in your community’s topic – use these lists to invite people to join your community.
  2. Look for related communities, calls, and sites you can use to promote your community – ask permission to do so, and then post, present, or send a brief invitation.
  3. Ask well-connected people to forward your announcement memo to their distribution lists, social networks, and communities.
  4. Write and submit articles to existing newsletters that reach your target audience.
  5. Use social networking tools and social media to inform possible members about your community.
  6. Ask the leaders of relevant organizations to send a one-time message to all of their people.
  7. Ensure that your community is included in the master community directory.
  8. Request that links to your community site be added on all relevant websites.
  9. Offer an incentive to join, e.g., a member will be chosen at random or the 100th member will receive an iPad or equivalent gift.
  10. Search personal profiles for people with relevant interests and/or expertise, and invite them to join.

 

From How to Be a Great Community Manager

 

At Deloitte, when we posted the following in the KM Yammer group, we received 122 replies:

  1. Are you a knowledge management professional? Or a KM advocate? Are you interested in staying on top of the latest insights in knowledge management both within and outside of the company? If so, we are looking for you to join the Knowledge Management community and promote KM principles by actively learning from and sharing your knowledge with other community members!
  2. Please reply here to note your interest - by doing so, you will gain the following benefits:
  • You will receive the calendar appointments for monthly KM community calls.
  • You will receive reminders about the calls.
  • You will have opportunities to help guide the KM community through activities like helping to identify potential topics for upcoming calls and prioritize those topics.

 To build a new community, send out an email to a distribution list or to individuals, or mention specific people in a post, with a message such as:


TO: All Gamification Enthusiasts


We have created a new group called Gamification for those who are interested in the subject. We encourage you to join the group by visiting <URL>, clicking the Join button, and setting email notifications by scrolling down on the right until you see: Access Options

x Subscribe to this group by email


Ray Sims
 

Rob,
I am not clear on if your context is public or if it is internal within an organization/company? If the former, online writing is one of the best magnets to attract like-minded folks...albeit it isn't quick to see results.

This is an area that I am currently investing in for my own growth and I recently compiled some resources I'm finding helpful in this Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/rsims/status/1537497495617560577 My 1), 2), and 3) replies include social media strategy that is highly relevant to attracting others. 4) is more straight-up writing and so not applicable. 

Ray


 

Robert,
I have been a member and a community facilitator of various communities.

There are techniques for encouraging, enlisting and broadening a community
For me it starts with recognition and authentic conversation and an invitation to share, to broaden the conversation with other individuals interested in the field, the topic.

One recognizes someone with a similar interest or shared knowledge. "I see you in this conversation"
One replies, engages, responds in a way that initiates conversation - with gratefulness and thanks. "I didn't know that, thank you, I'd like to learn more"
One engages in a way that broadens the conversation with others (lots of techniques online of coure #hashtags, @mentions) "Do you have friends, colleagues"

As a group conversation grows to the point it seems a "community" there are techniques for stimulating conversation, bringing in information that will increase the sense of value to participants, a growing knowledge base.

As communities grow, thoughtful, intentional facilitation is important, and there are facilitation and communication approaches that help people stay interested and excited.
It's also vitally important that community members feel that they have a sense of the person(s) in the community (photos, names, short bios)
(Note:  I did a short stint helping to facilitate SIKM.  One of my aspirations was to run a campaign to increase the number of members who post photos and expanded bio to help advance a sense of personal connection and warmth).

I have a ton of material on communities, how to initiate, grow and stimulate them.  I managed several quite large communities at Cisco both internally and public facing.  I've also been a member of this community for some years, and have spoken at forums on the topic.   I've also used communities to accelerate organizational change projects/processes.

It's a conscious, intentional process.  I include a couple of slides from a coaching session I did a few years ago and also a presentation for the SIKM community from 2014.


Good luck.
Catherine Shinners







Michelle Ryan
 

Hi Stan 

Hope you are well. I saw your post about the message that was posted on the KM Yammer group at Deloitte. 
I am the Knowledge Manager/Advocate at Deloitte South Africa, and I am very pleased to e-meet you. 
Kind regards
Michelle Ryan

On Tue, Jun 21, 2022 at 2:39 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
Joitske, I agree with your points. Here is what I have done to attract members interested in a specific topic.

From 10 Tips for Leading Communities 

  • Start with the broadest feasible topic and narrow down as needed.
  • Spin off narrower sub-topics only when a high volume of discussion or communication makes it necessary.
Publicize
  1. Look for all existing distribution lists of people interested in your community’s topic – use these lists to invite people to join your community.
  2. Look for related communities, calls, and sites you can use to promote your community – ask permission to do so, and then post, present, or send a brief invitation.
  3. Ask well-connected people to forward your announcement memo to their distribution lists, social networks, and communities.
  4. Write and submit articles to existing newsletters that reach your target audience.
  5. Use social networking tools and social media to inform possible members about your community.
  6. Ask the leaders of relevant organizations to send a one-time message to all of their people.
  7. Ensure that your community is included in the master community directory.
  8. Request that links to your community site be added on all relevant websites.
  9. Offer an incentive to join, e.g., a member will be chosen at random or the 100th member will receive an iPad or equivalent gift.
  10. Search personal profiles for people with relevant interests and/or expertise, and invite them to join.

 

From How to Be a Great Community Manager

 

At Deloitte, when we posted the following in the KM Yammer group, we received 122 replies:

  1. Are you a knowledge management professional? Or a KM advocate? Are you interested in staying on top of the latest insights in knowledge management both within and outside of the company? If so, we are looking for you to join the Knowledge Management community and promote KM principles by actively learning from and sharing your knowledge with other community members!
  2. Please reply here to note your interest - by doing so, you will gain the following benefits:
  • You will receive the calendar appointments for monthly KM community calls.
  • You will receive reminders about the calls.
  • You will have opportunities to help guide the KM community through activities like helping to identify potential topics for upcoming calls and prioritize those topics.

 To build a new community, send out an email to a distribution list or to individuals, or mention specific people in a post, with a message such as:


TO: All Gamification Enthusiasts


We have created a new group called Gamification for those who are interested in the subject. We encourage you to join the group by visiting <URL>, clicking the Join button, and setting email notifications by scrolling down on the right until you see: Access Options

x Subscribe to this group by email


Robert L. Bogue
 

Ray –

 

Thanks.  The core question is around building coalitions and how that’s related to communities.

 

As for writing in the public forum (Working Out Loud if you will), I’ve been doing that for a long time – and I’ll absolutely agree with you that it takes long term patience.  I will tell you some of the things that I thought didn’t fit my voice at all are the things that are very popular on my blog.  “The Psychology of Not Holding Children Accountable” is a perennial favorite – despite almost none of my writing is about raising children.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Ray Sims via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 10:40 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks? #CoP

 

Rob,
I am not clear on if your context is public or if it is internal within an organization/company? If the former, online writing is one of the best magnets to attract like-minded folks...albeit it isn't quick to see results.

This is an area that I am currently investing in for my own growth and I recently compiled some resources I'm finding helpful in this Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/rsims/status/1537497495617560577 My 1), 2), and 3) replies include social media strategy that is highly relevant to attracting others. 4) is more straight-up writing and so not applicable. 

Ray


Robert L. Bogue
 

Catherine & Stan –

 

I’ve been pondering your responses (and the others) and I think that all the strategies make sense.

 

If I rewind to my core inquiry, I realized that this is sort of a question about using a fishing net or using a fishing pole.  When we build communities it feels a lot like we put the nets out and tend them.  Eventually we end up with a lot of fish in the net.  Of course, if you’re fishing with a pole you throw the line out and are much more active about the process.

 

It feels like building a coalition is more like a fishing pole.  It feels more active.  It feels like the difference may be that in building communities we’re building conditions, and cultivating.  When we’re building coalitions it feels like we’re going to need to be more active.

 

Another analogy… communities feel like putting yourself “out there” versus coalitions sounds like serial dating.  You’re trying to find people in a more active way.

 

What does everyone think?  Fair characterizations?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Catherine Shinners via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 11:23 AM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Robert,

I have been a member and a community facilitator of various communities.

 

There are techniques for encouraging, enlisting and broadening a community

For me it starts with recognition and authentic conversation and an invitation to share, to broaden the conversation with other individuals interested in the field, the topic.

 

One recognizes someone with a similar interest or shared knowledge. "I see you in this conversation"

One replies, engages, responds in a way that initiates conversation - with gratefulness and thanks. "I didn't know that, thank you, I'd like to learn more"

One engages in a way that broadens the conversation with others (lots of techniques online of coure #hashtags, @mentions) "Do you have friends, colleagues"

 

As a group conversation grows to the point it seems a "community" there are techniques for stimulating conversation, bringing in information that will increase the sense of value to participants, a growing knowledge base.

 

As communities grow, thoughtful, intentional facilitation is important, and there are facilitation and communication approaches that help people stay interested and excited.

It's also vitally important that community members feel that they have a sense of the person(s) in the community (photos, names, short bios)

(Note:  I did a short stint helping to facilitate SIKM.  One of my aspirations was to run a campaign to increase the number of members who post photos and expanded bio to help advance a sense of personal connection and warmth).

 

I have a ton of material on communities, how to initiate, grow and stimulate them.  I managed several quite large communities at Cisco both internally and public facing.  I've also been a member of this community for some years, and have spoken at forums on the topic.   I've also used communities to accelerate organizational change projects/processes.

 

It's a conscious, intentional process.  I include a couple of slides from a coaching session I did a few years ago and also a presentation for the SIKM community from 2014.

 

 

Good luck.

Catherine Shinners

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Hi Rob, 

Recently, i conducted an experiment that was triggered with the following question: “What makes 5k+ members to come naturally and form a community in less than 24 hours?” 

i published my findings in a case study, you may find it here https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/understanding-nft-community-dynamics-insights-from-30-najjar-ph-d/ 

Thank you
Rachad 


John Carney
 

Rachad. 
As I alluded to in my post I think it’s pizza, look at the numbers. I’ve always found that when running physical community meetings the offer of a buffet lunch does wonders to bring people together, particularly with a military audience!. 
Best wishes John 


On 21 Jun 2022, at 19:36, Rachad Najjar <rachadbn@...> wrote:

Hi Rob, 

Recently, i conducted an experiment that was triggered with the following question: “What makes 5k+ members to come naturally and form a community in less than 24 hours?” 

i published my findings in a case study, you may find it here https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/understanding-nft-community-dynamics-insights-from-30-najjar-ph-d/ 

Thank you
Rachad 


John Carney
 

Robert. I don’t know if this is helpful but I always like to provide a contrarian view which I guess makes me more of a rebel than a coagulator (not sure if that’s a real word!)

Why do we/you want to talk to (large numbers of) like minded people in the first place - I appreciate that it’s maybe more pleasant but if it’s innovation (I work in r&d) or ROI we’re interested in we may likely learn more from opposites - Quality over quantity 
How do we discourage/ remove people who we don't really want or are perceived ‘difficult‘ - I actually always run a pretty broad church, but have been challenged by stakeholders on that. I was asked to speak privately to a member to discourage their unhelpful behaviour - it worked but it was a shame that the leaders hints hadn’t been adhered to, 
More contrarian too, large communities don’t work for me at a deep enough (useful) level.  I get most of my learning from one to one conversations 
Good luck John 
PS in case you were wondering I am quite nice really ;-) ! 


On 19 Jun 2022, at 17:13, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Robert L. Bogue
 

John –

 

In terms of like-minded people.  I think it’s a matter of scale.  One is too few.  A million is too many.  How many people you need “in your corner” is a big question.  And it’s a big range.

 

I have run my own business for decades now.  I live between worlds.  SharePoint.  Knowledge Management. Human Resources.  Records. Education.  Audio Production… the list goes on.  It’s really nice – bordering on almost a necessity -- to have people you can “hang” with.  SIKM is a community.  I’ve developed friendships, some deep friendships, with the people here.  I don’t post often.  I don’t have a personal relationship with everyone.  However, I’m also aware of the value of having a focusing element to searches.

 

I think the trick for me is in attracting people who have the same interests so you can build the coalition.  I don’t know how to do that quickly.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Carney via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 3:31 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: sikm@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Robert. I don’t know if this is helpful but I always like to provide a contrarian view which I guess makes me more of a rebel than a coagulator (not sure if that’s a real word!)

 

Why do we/you want to talk to (large numbers of) like minded people in the first place - I appreciate that it’s maybe more pleasant but if it’s innovation (I work in r&d) or ROI we’re interested in we may likely learn more from opposites - Quality over quantity 

How do we discourage/ remove people who we don't really want or are perceived ‘difficult‘ - I actually always run a pretty broad church, but have been challenged by stakeholders on that. I was asked to speak privately to a member to discourage their unhelpful behaviour - it worked but it was a shame that the leaders hints hadn’t been adhered to, 

More contrarian too, large communities don’t work for me at a deep enough (useful) level.  I get most of my learning from one to one conversations 

Good luck John 

PS in case you were wondering I am quite nice really ;-) ! 

 



On 19 Jun 2022, at 17:13, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


John Carney
 

Yes indeed and I am wondering if it might be variable for individuals, my wife as a strong introvert prefers a very small number of close relationships for example. Have you looked at Robin Dunbars work https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunbar's_number

I think SIKM is a terrific community - Stan is the quite exceptional leader for this type of thing that I have ever come across - although recently as I no longer work in KM I feel I should perhaps drop out. 

Best wishes to you and all, John 



On 21 Jun 2022, at 20:52, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



John –

 

In terms of like-minded people.  I think it’s a matter of scale.  One is too few.  A million is too many.  How many people you need “in your corner” is a big question.  And it’s a big range.

 

I have run my own business for decades now.  I live between worlds.  SharePoint.  Knowledge Management. Human Resources.  Records. Education.  Audio Production… the list goes on.  It’s really nice – bordering on almost a necessity -- to have people you can “hang” with.  SIKM is a community.  I’ve developed friendships, some deep friendships, with the people here.  I don’t post often.  I don’t have a personal relationship with everyone.  However, I’m also aware of the value of having a focusing element to searches.

 

I think the trick for me is in attracting people who have the same interests so you can build the coalition.  I don’t know how to do that quickly.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Carney via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2022 3:31 PM
To: main@sikm.groups.io
Cc: sikm@groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Rebels, Coalitions, and Communities - How does one find like minded folks?

 

Robert. I don’t know if this is helpful but I always like to provide a contrarian view which I guess makes me more of a rebel than a coagulator (not sure if that’s a real word!)

 

Why do we/you want to talk to (large numbers of) like minded people in the first place - I appreciate that it’s maybe more pleasant but if it’s innovation (I work in r&d) or ROI we’re interested in we may likely learn more from opposites - Quality over quantity 

How do we discourage/ remove people who we don't really want or are perceived ‘difficult‘ - I actually always run a pretty broad church, but have been challenged by stakeholders on that. I was asked to speak privately to a member to discourage their unhelpful behaviour - it worked but it was a shame that the leaders hints hadn’t been adhered to, 

More contrarian too, large communities don’t work for me at a deep enough (useful) level.  I get most of my learning from one to one conversations 

Good luck John 

PS in case you were wondering I am quite nice really ;-) ! 

 



On 19 Jun 2022, at 17:13, Robert L. Bogue <rbogue@...> wrote:



Friends –

 

I’m working on another book review (surprise).  I stumbled across an interesting (to me) question.  How does one find like minded folks?  How do we make our communities places that people want to find, seek out, and participate?

 

The context is that the book speaks about rebels and insubordination.  It’s clear that it’s a lonely road and – as we all know – it’s a much smoother and rewarding road when you have others along.  The language is the formation of a coalition.  However, I struggle with that word because while it’s operational in the technical sense it loses the deeper meaning of having someone walking with you that understands you and supports you.  I also struggled as I reviewed my references and realized that no one seems intent to speak about *how* to build a coalition beyond the imperative of a common purpose or idea.  Great.  But how does one find people with the similar mindset – or attract them.

 

I thought that the folks here might have some interesting thoughts about how to build a community that attracts people with similar interests on how to find like-minded people to build a coalition (a presumably more active engagement.)

 

Thoughts?

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 


Stan Garfield
 

John, thanks for the kind words. There is no need to drop out, as you are still able to contribute despite no longer working in KM.