Recommendation for KMS with specific features #tools


Tami Dubi
 

Hi everyone,
I am looking for a knowledge management system that includes these features (and I am excluding the options of SharePoint and Confluence):
  • a smart search engine that can search other software in the organization so that the user is not concern about the location of the information.
  • content management, including standardization and templates
  • dynamic Q & A with validation by the users
  • applying visualization and usability experience
  • forums/ chats/ supports community of practice
  • decision support features
  • web-based system + responsive

any suggestions would be highly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tami


Lisa Austin
 

Hi Tami,
I haven’t replied to a post in ages, but for some reason your request caught me this morning.  I’m going to give my opinion, from my 20 years of working with KM systems…. you are looking for the holy grail.  You don’t provide enough info of how large an organization, or $ constraints..  however,  there is no one “KM system” that does all of that.  1 may do some of it, but then you will have to integrate with something else.  More than likely you will have multiple options for the content management, visualization/usability, web based + responsive..  and maybe some of the others, but the smart search engine will definitely have to be a separate tool…. And, on top of all that, to get the tools and to integrate them will be in the millions.  My recommendation would be to not look for a “KM system”.. but focus on which KM capabilities your organization has the capacity to deal with and focus on that.  Your KM system that you describe would be trying to solve at least 5 or 6 different KM problems (if not more).  I recommend an agile approach of minimum viable product is best.  Choose 1 problem you are trying to solve and start there.  Yes, it might be throw away if the tool doesn’t scale, but better to see if your organization is willing to use a cheap tool, then to spend the time and effort to deliver an all encompassing tool and find out they really don’t care about any of it, and you wasted millions.
That’s just my opinion having worked on the exact same thing for 3 different large corporations.   


Robert M. Taylor
 

Lisa Austin, good summary. Yes, Tami, ruling out M365 you’re ruling out the best integrated ‘base’ but you’d still have way loads of work to do to get what you describe. The other option is to integrate open source or best of breed components and for that you need a skilled team. You might want to see what you already have. For instance, for a sales team using Salesforce.com just for pipeline, a team I worked with got a long way working with the vendor and leveraging its Chatter chat channel and content management capabilities. Even tho I do like tech, I’m content enough to have something in the IT space because there are way more important things for me to focus on. I will read with interest and check up on any products others recommend though! Thanks for sparking the thread. 

Robert Taylor
Sent from mobile

On 15 Jul 2021, at 13:47, Lisa Austin <lbaustin8@...> wrote:

Hi Tami,
I haven’t replied to a post in ages, but for some reason your request caught me this morning.  I’m going to give my opinion, from my 20 years of working with KM systems…. you are looking for the holy grail.  You don’t provide enough info of how large an organization, or $ constraints..  however,  there is no one “KM system” that does all of that.  1 may do some of it, but then you will have to integrate with something else.  More than likely you will have multiple options for the content management, visualization/usability, web based + responsive..  and maybe some of the others, but the smart search engine will definitely have to be a separate tool…. And, on top of all that, to get the tools and to integrate them will be in the millions.  My recommendation would be to not look for a “KM system”.. but focus on which KM capabilities your organization has the capacity to deal with and focus on that.  Your KM system that you describe would be trying to solve at least 5 or 6 different KM problems (if not more).  I recommend an agile approach of minimum viable product is best.  Choose 1 problem you are trying to solve and start there.  Yes, it might be throw away if the tool doesn’t scale, but better to see if your organization is willing to use a cheap tool, then to spend the time and effort to deliver an all encompassing tool and find out they really don’t care about any of it, and you wasted millions.
That’s just my opinion having worked on the exact same thing for 3 different large corporations.   


Tami Dubi
 

H Lisa and Robert,
Thanks for your detailed responses.

@Lisa_Austin, you actually read my mind. I was thinking of the holy grail while writing the specifications. I thought that a system with those specifications was non-existent, but I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss some magical system out there.

I agree with you that we can't have it all and have to be practical and focus on what we can achieve in what we have, and I also believe that strategy, processes, and people come before tools. However, companies today insist on tools, especially companies that are software developers themselves. 

The company/ companies that I referred to are fast-growing High-Tech startup companies, where most employees are in their 20s. 

And to answer your question, @Robert_Tylor, That is one of the reasons why I excluded SP, which is conceived cumbersome, outdated, and generally "not cool."
After reviewing your answer, I wonder if it is a good idea for us as a group of practitioners to form a shared knowledge source that will include a table that will include Software desirable features. We will share software that we worked with for each feature that gave us a solution for a KM challenge, maybe with a short example, something like the table below. I think it will contribute to the knowledge of this group. What do you think?


Feature

System that was used  

KM challenge that I solved

Example

Information protection issues

Specify other systems which integrated with the solution

 A search engine that can search other software in the organization

 

 

 

 

 

Content management, including standardization and templates

 

 

 

 

 

Dynamic Q & A with validation options

 

 

 

 

 

Enhancing knowledge by using Visualization and usability

 

 

 

 

 

Forums/ chats/ supports community of practice

 

 

 

 

 

Decision support features including feedback process +...

 

 

 

 

 

Web-based/ cloud based

 

 

 

 

 

Responsive

 

 

 

 

 


Lucky Esa
 

Hi Tami, 
this always be sparkling some interesting discussions when we're talking about KM System, which is I believe that you're discussing about an application or such a platform actually. rather than the KM system definition that covers the components incl. the people, process, etc.
I've been probably since around 2003/2004 helping clients building "KM System", which to me sometimes it's kinda misleading by interpreting it to a product, but rather it's some combination of software products. it's eventually requires interoperability and integration of some or many independent system that produces data, information and knowledge to some extent for the business. And even nowadays it needs to interop with systems outside the organisation from external parties. 
Yes of course we can approach it by implementing such a content management system (CMS) at the beginning, just find one that you think it would satisfied the knowledge-process requirements, think about a quick-win. Probably you'd looking at some cms out of the shelf like sharepoint families, drupal, confluence, alfresco, liferay, etc. Till at some point you would start needing some customization, or even crafting the application yourself, or building some kind of interoperability tools like API, etc.
Just think about an agile approach, deliver fast, get feedback from the user, then iterate. Since in my opinion based on experiences KM system is a very dynamic and a living application or even a platform eventually. 
Perhaps by using kinda design-sprint methodology you could define the MVP (minimum viable product) and start building and iterating the product to meet the users and business needs. Just start by using some of the cms product at the beginning. So you'll be saving time and delivering fast to the users, based on the knowledge management processes defined. 

based on your requirements above, as far of my knowledge and experience my suggestions would be sharepoints or drupal.

feel free to discuss more.

warm regards,
Lucky

On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 5:57 PM Tami Dubi <tamidubi@...> wrote:
Hi everyone,
I am looking for a knowledge management system that includes these features (and I am excluding the options of SharePoint and Confluence):
  • a smart search engine that can search other software in the organization so that the user is not concern about the location of the information.
  • content management, including standardization and templates
  • dynamic Q & A with validation by the users
  • applying visualization and usability experience
  • forums/ chats/ supports community of practice
  • decision support features
  • web-based system + responsive

any suggestions would be highly appreciated.

Thanks,
Tami



--
"Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible." 


Robert L. Bogue
 

Tami –

 

I was thinking about your response and I started to wonder if knowledge management was “not cool.”  I’ve seen some truly awful SharePoint implementations – and some amazing ones.  I think excluding software before identifying requirements and desires is probably not the right order – as many others have said or alluded to.

 

I like the idea of creating a listing of things that people have done but I wonder who will do the work of correlating and curating the content.

 

I’ve been pondering KM in the context of Adam Grant’s book Give and Take and how the goal of KM is to increase the degree to which people act like givers in their organizations and that we often do this by reducing or removing barriers.  (Ala hassle maps, See Demand)  It seems to me like we spend a lot of time building systems (human and technical) that reduce the ambiguity of how to share (give) and there by make it easier and less frightening.  I was just reviewing my notes from The Tipping Point because I was recalling the study about students getting tetanus shots and that the key differentiator was providing a map to where the health center was on campus.

 

All of this to say… I think it’s wise to figure out the operating model that we’re trying to instill in the organization and then seek to develop the systems that we believe will lead to that operating model.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tami Dubi via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 16, 2021 2:50 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Recommendation for KMS with specific features #tools

 

H Lisa and Robert,
Thanks for your detailed responses.

@Lisa_Austin, you actually read my mind. I was thinking of the holy grail while writing the specifications. I thought that a system with those specifications was non-existent, but I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss some magical system out there.

I agree with you that we can't have it all and have to be practical and focus on what we can achieve in what we have, and I also believe that strategy, processes, and people come before tools. However, companies today insist on tools, especially companies that are software developers themselves. 

The company/ companies that I referred to are fast-growing High-Tech startup companies, where most employees are in their 20s. 

And to answer your question, @Robert_Tylor, That is one of the reasons why I excluded SP, which is conceived cumbersome, outdated, and generally "not cool."
After reviewing your answer, I wonder if it is a good idea for us as a group of practitioners to form a shared knowledge source that will include a table that will include Software desirable features. We will share software that we worked with for each feature that gave us a solution for a KM challenge, maybe with a short example, something like the table below. I think it will contribute to the knowledge of this group. What do you think?

 

Feature

System that was used  

KM challenge that I solved

Example

Information protection issues

Specify other systems which integrated with the solution

 A search engine that can search other software in the organization

 

 

 

 

 

Content management, including standardization and templates

 

 

 

 

 

Dynamic Q & A with validation options

 

 

 

 

 

Enhancing knowledge by using Visualization and usability

 

 

 

 

 

Forums/ chats/ supports community of practice

 

 

 

 

 

Decision support features including feedback process +...

 

 

 

 

 

Web-based/ cloud based

 

 

 

 

 

Responsive

 

 

 

 

 


David Eddy
 

On Wed, Jul 14, 2021 at 06:57 AM, Tami Dubi wrote:
a smart search engine that can search other software in the organization so that the user is not concern about the location of the information.
Tami -

That's a round-about, long winded way of saying INTEROPERABLE.

Integration (unless you're still working on the first page of the first spreadsheet) IS NOT POSSIBLE.

Useful information is scattered about the organization (particularly in hi-tech startups) in all sorts of incompatible formats.  


I stumbled across a wonderful example of the sort of challenge KM is up against.  A now retired long-time data modeller who worked with state transportation / highway departments, offered that in one site, he found 32 different, acceptable definitions for "CULVERT."


Lisa Austin
 

Hmm. So a start up tech company.. because they are start ups, there are more process and behavioral options..  But, from a technology perspective, I think the first order is to understand the tools that the teams use to collaborate especially in our current Covid environment..  is it Slack? Zoom? MS Teams?  That’s where the knowledge of the company is.. that’s where you first connect with people and that’s where knowledge transfer occurs.  I agree with Robert.. I started my KM career with SharePoint 2001..  What is available today with the M365 suite (not just SharePoint) is probably the best KM System I have ever seen or worked with.. There is no “system” out there that has all of the pieces fully integrated into the daily life of a knowledge worker..  Admittedly, Microsoft only gives you 80% of what you need..  over 20 years i have come to the conclusion that it is a waste of corporate resources ($$, time & effort) to satisfy that last 20% with an integration or different tool…. by the time you complete your roll out of that integrated tool, Microsoft will have delivered on it (even if it's 3 years later)..  It’s always been a goal to integrate “KM” into the daily lives of a worker..  I would love to hear others viewpoint if there is any other “product, or already connected suite of products” out there that has all of the technologies needed to enable any KM problem. 


Tim Powell
 

Thanks Rob,

 

I am so glad you mention Adrian Slywotzky — his work was hugely influential on my own, and I think he deserves to be in everyone’s bag of management tools.  (And applaud your terrific summary of Demand.)

 

I’ve noticed that the great majority of the discussions and literature on KM focus on the SUPPLY side — the tools and techniques.  Value is produced on the DEMAND side, however — users, patrons, sponsors.  Failure to recognize and act on this simple insight is the single biggest obstacle to successful and effective KM.

 

I came to the knowledge field after working in marketing for PwC, and in the disciplines of competitive and market intelligence (CMI).  About 80% of the work I do now consists of applying basic marketing and management principles to knowledge.  “What if knowledge got an MBA?” is the tagline I use for my latest book, which builds on these principles.

 

Relentless focus on the needs of enterprise knowledge users — and how those needs change as circumstances change — can yield huge benefits.

 

In my experience,

 

Tim

 

TIM WOOD POWELL | President, The Knowledge Agency® | Author, The Value of Knowledge |

New York City, USA  |  TEL +1.212.243.1200 | 

SITE www.KnowledgeAgency.com | BLOG www.KnowledgeValueChain.com |

 

 

From: <main@SIKM.groups.io> on behalf of "Robert L. Bogue" <rbogue@...>
Reply-To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Date: Friday, July 16, 2021 at 8:09 AM
To: "main@SIKM.groups.io" <main@SIKM.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Recommendation for KMS with specific features #tools

 

Tami –

 

I was thinking about your response and I started to wonder if knowledge management was “not cool.”  I’ve seen some truly awful SharePoint implementations – and some amazing ones.  I think excluding software before identifying requirements and desires is probably not the right order – as many others have said or alluded to.

 

I like the idea of creating a listing of things that people have done but I wonder who will do the work of correlating and curating the content.

 

I’ve been pondering KM in the context of Adam Grant’s book Give and Take and how the goal of KM is to increase the degree to which people act like givers in their organizations and that we often do this by reducing or removing barriers.  (Ala hassle maps, See Demand)  It seems to me like we spend a lot of time building systems (human and technical) that reduce the ambiguity of how to share (give) and there by make it easier and less frightening.  I was just reviewing my notes from The Tipping Point because I was recalling the study about students getting tetanus shots and that the key differentiator was providing a map to where the health center was on campus.

 

All of this to say… I think it’s wise to figure out the operating model that we’re trying to instill in the organization and then seek to develop the systems that we believe will lead to that operating model.

 

Rob

 

-------------------

Robert L. Bogue

O: (317) 844-5310  M: (317) 506-4977 Blog: http://www.thorprojects.com/blog

Want to be confident about your change management efforts?  https://ConfidentChangeManagement.com

Are you burned out?  https://ExtinguishBurnout.com can help you get out of it (for free)

 

From: main@SIKM.groups.io <main@SIKM.groups.io> On Behalf Of Tami Dubi via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 16, 2021 2:50 AM
To: main@SIKM.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SIKM] Recommendation for KMS with specific features #tools

 

H Lisa and Robert,
Thanks for your detailed responses.

@Lisa_Austin, you actually read my mind. I was thinking of the holy grail while writing the specifications. I thought that a system with those specifications was non-existent, but I wanted to make sure that I didn't miss some magical system out there.

I agree with you that we can't have it all and have to be practical and focus on what we can achieve in what we have, and I also believe that strategy, processes, and people come before tools. However, companies today insist on tools, especially companies that are software developers themselves. 

The company/ companies that I referred to are fast-growing High-Tech startup companies, where most employees are in their 20s. 

And to answer your question, @Robert_Tylor, That is one of the reasons why I excluded SP, which is conceived cumbersome, outdated, and generally "not cool."
After reviewing your answer, I wonder if it is a good idea for us as a group of practitioners to form a shared knowledge source that will include a table that will include Software desirable features. We will share software that we worked with for each feature that gave us a solution for a KM challenge, maybe with a short example, something like the table below. I think it will contribute to the knowledge of this group. What do you think?

 

Feature

System that was used  

KM challenge that I solved

Example

Information protection issues

Specify other systems which integrated with the solution

 A search engine that can search other software in the organization

 

 

 

 

 

Content management, including standardization and templates

 

 

 

 

 

Dynamic Q & A with validation options

 

 

 

 

 

Enhancing knowledge by using Visualization and usability

 

 

 

 

 

Forums/ chats/ supports community of practice

 

 

 

 

 

Decision support features including feedback process +...

 

 

 

 

 

Web-based/ cloud based

 

 

 

 

 

Responsive

 

 

 

 

 


Stan Garfield
 

See these previous threads:


Tami Dubi
 

Thanks, everyone for your answers.
You gave me a lot to think about.

On Sat, Jul 17, 2021 at 2:32 PM Stan Garfield <stangarfield@...> wrote:
See these previous threads:



--

בברכה,
תמי דובי 
052-6719193
 


Matt Moore
 

Hi,

Asking a question on an email list isn't easy so good on Tami for
starting the discussion. The responses have lots of good points in
them. Here is my response to this discussion and others like it. We
are all coming to this with the best of intentions and what follows is
not a criticism of anyone but an attempt to change the kind of
conversations we have.

Every few months on SIKM or KM4Dev, someone posts a question about
what systems are available that meet a list of requirements. I
generally don't respond because the information provided by posters is
rarely enough to give them a good answer. The requirements are often
very general (content management, search, video conferencing, etc) and
there is little organisational context around what users are trying to
do (in the form of a classic user story "As an X, I want to do Y, to
achieve Z"). There is also rarely much context about the existing
technology landscape within the organisation (e.g. are they a
Microsoft shop) and the organisation's capability to implement
solutions (e.g. "we want a system that requires 10 PhDs in data
science to manage but we have half a COBOL dev on staff"). As someone
who has worked on both sides of technology procurement, I also have a
particular axe to grind against vague requirements - "easy to use"
being my most hated (easy to use for what? by who? etc)

While people often ask "what" they should acquire, they rarely ask
"how" they should acquire it. There is a good book called "The Right
Way To Select Technology":
https://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/right-way-to-select-technology/ -
which is useful, cheap, and short. Its authors try to move people away
from the traditional approach - where different groups in an
organisation specify random requirements into a big list and then ask
vendors "yes or no" against each one - to a more thorough and rigorous
one.

There is lots of content out there. Gartner Magic Quadrants and
Forrester Waves will give you lists of standard features and common
vendors for a market (and can be obtained for the price of your email
from vendors that appear in the top right hand corner of their
charts). Real Story Group used to do very thorough reports on
KM-related areas but now focus solely on martech. Deep Analysis
provide some good industry analysis on content management, there is
CMSWire, and many consultants who publish comparison papers, etc.
Others can probably chip in with their own suggestions. Where I think
that this group can provide value is in helping requestors work
through the specifics of their situation rather than simply firing out
three vendor names.

The general answer to any technology question is:
- Microsoft probably have a solution that will cover 60-80% of your
needs and maybe integrate with the rest of their stack if you are
lucky.
- There are a plethora of small vendors (whose names either lack
important vowels or were invented by a 6 year old) with nicely
designed, niche solutions who will have vigorous advocates in your
organisation.
- There are a few others solutions from big vendors (e.g. Cisco,
Atlassian, OpenText) that may be right for you depending on your
technical legacy.

I would invite people who post technology requests to provide as much
context as they can on what they are trying to achieve in terms of
user stories, organisation and technological context. I would invite
them to ask about the "how" as well as the "what".

Regards,

Matt Moore