Webinar - Open Data & Sharing - 2 June 2021 #webinar


Matt Moore
 


Public sector organisations are increasingly encouraged to share data with other state institution or private businesses and to make datasets available to the public. The drive to data sharing is supposed to improve service delivery and help boost an innovative digital economy. But what does this mean in practice for public servants and citizens? Three researchers will discuss their research into this topic:
- What does "open" actually mean across different government agencies?
- How is open data being shared across platforms like Wikidata?
- How does data sharing work between different instititions in fields like health?

Heather Ford as an Associate Professor at the School of Communication at UTS where she is Head of Discipline for Digital and Social Media. She has a background as an activist for internet rights and free and open source software and content movement. The co-founder of Creative Commons South Africa and former Executive Director of iCommons, she has also worked as a Digital Vision Fellow at Stanford University, a Google Policy Fellow for the Electronic Frontier Initiative, a Fellow for the Software Sustainability Institute in the UK and a University Academic Fellow in Digital Methods at Leeds University. Her current research is focused on the implications of datafication and automation for the representation of knowledge in global contexts.

Suneel Jethani is a researcher and lecturer at the University of Technology Sydney. His research centres on embodied technology, datafication and issues of technology governance and design. Suneel has published in International Communication Gazette, Communication, Politics and Culture, M/C Journal and in Embodied Computing (2020) MIT Press. Suneel has forthcoming books on self-tracking technology (Emerald, 2021) and open data (Palgrave, 2021).

Tsvetelina Hristova is a PhD candidate at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University. Her main research interests focus on labour, migration, digital infrastructures and the ways in which digitalisation transforms the political as a field of power and resistance.